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Discussion Starter #1
My in-laws have a near 6 year old German Shepard, he has developed a strange growth on his rear paw. I have attached pics of it. Any idea what this is?

Unfortunately taking him to the vet is not something they can easily do as he is VERY aggressive to strangers. To the point where they have to sedate or trank him before he can even be allowed anywhere near the establishment.

Any ideas to what this is? Is it serious?

Thanks!
 

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Looks like it needs to be removed and biopsied to me.

If Holly replies, listen to her....
 

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i think they should bite the bullet on this one and take him in. especially given his age and breed. the things it could be range from benign to aggressively malignant and there is no way to tell just by looking.

i hope it's nothing.
 

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It is not so easy though, they have taken him to 2 vets locally that have asked them to leave because of his aggression.
 

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How about muzzling him and taking him to the vet...I agree that is needs to be removed and checked. I know 2 dogs that had to have a toe removed due to cancer.
 

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give him some benadryl to sedate him and muzzle him. I am not a fan of muzzling and I know Lynne Marie is not either but the dog already sounds super aggressive and this could be life threatening (or could be nothing at all). To me the risk of doing nothing is too great.

Why is the dog so aggressive, btw??
 

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give him some benadryl to sedate him and muzzle him. I am not a fan of muzzling and I know Lynne Marie is not either but the dog already sounds super aggressive and this could be life threatening (or could be nothing at all). To me the risk of doing nothing is too great.

Why is the dog so aggressive, btw??
I am not a fan of muzzling but like marbear said..the health of the dog is more important. You might even contact one of the vets that they have already gone to and ask them to give you a sedative to give the dog prior to bringing it in..
 

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give him some benadryl to sedate him and muzzle him. I am not a fan of muzzling and I know Lynne Marie is not either but the dog already sounds super aggressive and this could be life threatening (or could be nothing at all). To me the risk of doing nothing is too great.

Why is the dog so aggressive, btw??
He has been like this since they got him. Even as a puppy he was only fond of us. He likes his little circle of people and that is it...

Even sedated, he was still wild. I think the sedation pissed him off even more. He would not let anyone get close to him (other than us). Even with the muzzle on, he was still doing his best to bite and nip everyone.
 

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I have worked for a vet. There ARE medications to effectively sedate the dog, both oral and intravenous. Find a vet that will do it right.

Have the vet prescribe an oral medication that can be given an hour before the appointment, preferably a dose of a benzodiazpam, rather than one of the acepromezine type drugs. The benzos (Valium family) truly sedate the dog and take away fear, while the "ace" type of drugs simply take away a dog's ability to move, but in their minds they are still just as terrified, and the experience of helpless sedation will cause more terror next visit. Many vets do not know about this distinction so you must educate them. (sounds like the dog has already had a bad experience with improper sedation... let's get it done right next time.)

Give the pill to the dog an hour before the appointment.
When you get to the vets, check in at the front desk without the dog, and ask to be able to bring the dog right into an exam room rather than spending any time in the waiting room, where there are other dogs. Muzzle your dog and bring him in when the clinic is ready for him. If the dog needs additional sedation in the exam room, that can be done intravenously, with a short acting drug called propofol.

This is not rocket science. Any veterinary clinic worthy of an office-visit-fee can work with you on this. Explain this plan to them. Ask for the correct type of sedative (Valium type drug, not Acepromazine type drug) You as the owners take the lead on this, and they will follow. You must be confident in what you request.
 

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I have worked for a vet. There ARE medications to effectively sedate the dog, both oral and intravenous. Find a vet that will do it right.

Have the vet prescribe an oral medication that can be given an hour before the appointment, preferably a dose of a benzodiazpam, rather than one of the acepromezine type drugs. The benzos (Valium family) truly sedate the dog and take away fear, while the "ace" type of drugs simply take away a dog's ability to move, but in their minds they are still just as terrified, and the experience of helpless sedation will cause more terror next visit. Many vets do not know about this distinction so you must educate them. (sounds like the dog has already had a bad experience with improper sedation... let's get it done right next time.)

Give the pill to the dog an hour before the appointment.
When you get to the vets, check in at the front desk without the dog, and ask to be able to bring the dog right into an exam room rather than spending any time in the waiting room, where there are other dogs. Muzzle your dog and bring him in when the clinic is ready for him. If the dog needs additional sedation in the exam room, that can be done intravenously, with a short acting drug called propofol.

This is not rocket science. Any veterinary clinic worthy of an office-visit-fee can work with you on this. Explain this plan to them. Ask for the correct type of sedative (Valium type drug, not Acepromazine type drug) You as the owners take the lead on this, and they will follow. You must be confident in what you request.
This. Bite the bullet and take him in, plain and simple.
 

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No way to tell what that is just by looking at it. He needs to go in and have a sample taken of it and/or it just taken off (which may not be able to be done the same day). Ditto the sedative and muzzle. You can try a basket muzzle instead so the dog doesn't feel totally confined. I would not give Ace if you can help it because sometimes can cause paradoxical effects.

But, as Tess stated, there are ways a vet can deal with this. I'm sure I've dealt with worse dogs than yours. Trust me :)
 
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