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Finally conned the husband into video-taping me. He did a good job, me, not so much, & dog is tired, but,

the jumps are upside down tomatoe cages, poky tops capped and taped for safety with duck tape.

the tunnel is two folding lawnchairs lying sideways parallel with a tarp over top (this one's a new idea to Sonic but he's getting it.

the weaves are garden stakes with pvc pipe dropped on top (this cost me more than zero, but after using a bicycle stand in the park for months (awkward to say the least), I knuckled in a bought the pipes -- the garden stakes I already had, but since I can't use them in the garden, whelp, I count that as money).

Basically making do with what I've got. In winter I'll treat myself to another session of 'real' agility. The more basics I can put together the more I'll get out of those classes (which are semi-private & flexible).

Last year, Sonic didn't like tunnels, so I finally cobbled up a tunnel facsimile (my guess is that he wants to keep me in sight, so I hope the fake tunnel will help)

https://www.facebook.com/ingrid.sch...51137063430/10155751128808430/?type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/ingrid.sch...51137063430/10155751134598430/?type=3&theater
 

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Oh my God, I could cry, look at how happy he is. Tail up so high, awesome speed after the toy!

I used the most homemade, ghetto, bargain stuff I could scrape together for a long time before I bought any real equipment. (Even my "real" tunnel, was bought as a factory second, so it was cheaper). Agility equipment is insanely costly. The dogwalk I'm looking at is 2,000 dollars. Eeeeeeeeh.

For the jumps, do you think he would drive out to the toy if you placed it at the end? Or if he would hold a sit stay, you could go to the end and stand near the toy to direct him. Levi struggled with watching the reward hand for a while, so I had to routinely stuff a wet, drooly toy down my pants. :p
 
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Oh my God, I could cry, look at how happy he is. Tail up so high, awesome speed after the toy!

I used the most homemade, ghetto, bargain stuff I could scrape together for a long time before I bought any real equipment. (Even my "real" tunnel, was bought as a factory second, so it was cheaper). Agility equipment is insanely costly. The dogwalk I'm looking at is 2,000 dollars. Eeeeeeeeh.

For the jumps, do you think he would drive out to the toy if you placed it at the end? Or if he would hold a sit stay, you could go to the end and stand near the toy to direct him. Levi struggled with watching the reward hand for a while, so I had to routinely stuff a wet, drooly toy down my pants. :p
Ha has, you've correctly noted that I confused the heck out him by getting 'handsy' (obvious with toy or food). Yep, same deal, I need to hide that thing.

I will try a new set up (good idea), I have a hard time with send-aways, so I'm always working it (2nd video is him 'getting it').

He's not super 'into' toys. He likes them as they equal food, he likes them in context, but has no desire to possess them; I can put them down anywhere and they are irrelevant to him. The only toys he likes are ones he sees a cat playing with (and only if a cat's actively playing, then he'll get excited and grab it as soon as the cat leaves it (sooo polite!), but if I 'play with it', that doesn't make him want it (I think he knows I'm faking?).

Thanks, Shandula, so much compliments (nothing compliments me more than a happy dog), and some easy to try pointers.
 

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I think your set up looks awesome. Also those jumps will help you learn how to work around with wings. A lot of people have just PVC jumps and have to learn how to maneuver once wings are introduced.

I also agree, he's looking at your hands a lot. I also have dogs that aren't really toy motivated. I ended up getting a tug pouch like these
https://www.cleanrun.com/index.cfm/product/3401/tugaway-tuff-pouch-tug-toy.htm
And would put the string cheese in them. Roxie would drive to the toy and pick it up because it smelled yummy. I would then open the velcro and give her a piece. Now those pouches are worth their weight in gold to her. Seems like something that would be easy to make for someone who is crafty. Also a lot easier to stick in the back of the pants (which I do to hide it).
 
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Great vids. I love watching a dog have fun with their best buddy. I also really applaud your creativity making the obstacles, MacGyver would be proud. I know my neighbors have scratched their heads seeing some of my "improvisations" I made to train/play with my dog, some work and some not so much.
 

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Since others have offered advice on the "nuts and bolts" of getting Sonic to tear over the jumps, I'll add my two cents worth and that's probably two cents more than my opinion is worth regarding agility training but what the heck. One of my mentors really stressed building anticipation in a dog via a predictable pending release as in, there is a clear beginning and a definitive ending to many processes. As Shandula suggested "For the jumps, do you think he would drive out to the toy if you placed it at the end? Or if he would hold a sit stay, you could go to the end and stand near the toy to direct him." Having Sonic on a wait command with the lure and possibly you ( if needed ) at the end of the jumps awaiting your release cue might create this anticipation, sometimes the longer the hold and wait gets the dog quivering with anticipation and they explode out of the wait to complete the task per your release.

I understand agility overall is a very fluid and continuous skill once they are in the course and I assume each segment must be taught separately and then all combined to produce the final flowing product.

Like I said "two cents worth".
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think your set up looks awesome. Also those jumps will help you learn how to work around with wings. A lot of people have just PVC jumps and have to learn how to maneuver once wings are introduced.

I also agree, he's looking at your hands a lot. I also have dogs that aren't really toy motivated. I ended up getting a tug pouch like these
https://www.cleanrun.com/index.cfm/product/3401/tugaway-tuff-pouch-tug-toy.htm
And would put the string cheese in them. Roxie would drive to the toy and pick it up because it smelled yummy. I would then open the velcro and give her a piece. Now those pouches are worth their weight in gold to her. Seems like something that would be easy to make for someone who is crafty. Also a lot easier to stick in the back of the pants (which I do to hide it).
I also have a tug-n-treat frisbee (also clean run), but switched to this donut (it was a gift) because he seems to like the action more (it bounces & runs in unexpected ways), but I'll try switching back to a refresher, or yes, I can make the little flat toy (started with that).

Thanks for tips.

& he loves string cheese, but especially if I wiggle it so it looks like a live worm.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Since others have offered advice on the "nuts and bolts" of getting Sonic to tear over the jumps, I'll add my two cents worth and that's probably two cents more than my opinion is worth regarding agility training but what the heck. One of my mentors really stressed building anticipation in a dog via a predictable pending release as in, there is a clear beginning and a definitive ending to many processes. As Shandula suggested "For the jumps, do you think he would drive out to the toy if you placed it at the end? Or if he would hold a sit stay, you could go to the end and stand near the toy to direct him." Having Sonic on a wait command with the lure and possibly you ( if needed ) at the end of the jumps awaiting your release cue might create this anticipation, sometimes the longer the hold and wait gets the dog quivering with anticipation and they explode out of the wait to complete the task per your release.

I understand agility overall is a very fluid and continuous skill once they are in the course and I assume each segment must be taught separately and then all combined to produce the final flowing product.

Like I said "two cents worth".
Thanks! Also, you assume correctly. Last year, in my agility class, I felt a bit rushed to sequences, which is one reason to practice at home. The weaves are brand new, and the 'tunnel' is brand new (he did real tunnels before, but this contraption is new), so I am trying to reward for each.

I will try the 'wait', and another of your observations, to make a more definitive beginning & end is very good. I was rushing things, and flustered, as I had the camera on me, and know my husband doesn't like using it, so I didn't want to take too long, and also knew Sonic was at the 'end' of the session (long day, and I asked to be filmed just before I thought I should quit), BUT this messiness about starts & stops probably happens alot, and may explain why some of my sessions rock and others flub.

Thanks!
 
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