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I have a 8 month old exotic bully! Now I have several obstacles I am having trouble with. The main 1 is my dog using the bathroom in the house. And for some reason he pees on the beds! If you let him alone in any bedroom in my house he will jump up and pee. Now I also have a 2 year old pit bull that is my sister's dog and she lives with me. I thought maybe it was a territory thing but why my bed? I take him out every 30 mins and take the water away but he still goes in the house and on the bed! I just moved into a new apartment and the floors are so bad! I don't know how to get it up. I have tried dawn and laundry soap but nothing. The other obstacle I am having is him being very over protective of me and he doesn't come up and sniff you, he growls, shows his teeth, trys to bite and jumps up and his hair sticks up. I have kids and he acts like that with them too.i was thinking a mussel for around kids but he still jumps up and he's very stocky so he has alot of force. I have to put him in a crate when people are in my house and he barks the whole time. My landlord is gonna make me get rid of him if I can't get him trained soon. I can't leave the house cuz he barks in the crate the entire time and howls! I need help!
 

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Hi. Welcome to the forum. :)

take the water away
Never, ever take a dog's water away from him! They should have access to water 24/7.

For the toilet training issue, keep him out of the bedrooms - either by shutting doors, baby gating them, or by keeping him tethered to you with a houseline (regular looking leash but without a handle so there's nothing to get snagged).

I know you said you take him out every half hour - you need to keep that up. When he goes where you want him to, praise like he's done 5 back flips, danced the Tango and handed you a rose. With his paw. ;) Chicken, frankfurter, cheese rains from the sky.

If/when he has an accident, keep your face and body language neutral. If you say anything at all, make a joke of it. "Oh dear, we have a Code Pee - I wonder who did that? Cleanup in the Bedding Section.". If laundry detergent isn't doing it, you'll need a specially designed enzyme cleaner.

he growls, shows his teeth, trys to bite
When he does this, remove yourself so that he learns guarding mum = losing mum. Praise him calm behaviour around others (the reward in this case is continued access to you).
 

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Considering that your landlord is unhappy and may kick you out or demand you get rid of the dog, can you sign up for a behavior training class or hire a trainer to help you with this?

All the suggestions above are good ones, but if you are not familiar with dog training and have limited time, it really might be a good idea to get help with this from a professional.
 

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Is he desexed? Excess levels of testosterone can increase his tendency to mark territory and be overly protective.

Rouse on him for barking, praise him when he stops. The same when he starts to growl, and yes walk away. A firm smack when he pees inside, treat and praise when he pees outside.
 

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Is he desexed? Excess levels of testosterone can increase his tendency to mark territory and be overly protective.

Rouse on him for barking, praise him when he stops. The same when he starts to growl, and yes walk away. A firm smack when he pees inside, treat and praise when he pees outside.
It is against forum rules to promote the use of adversive training methods such as smacking. Plus, smacking a dog for toileting indoors only teaches the dog not to toilet in front of you, meaning there's an increased risk of the dog sneaking off to toilet. It doesn't teach the dog that the toiler is outside.

As for shouting (I assume that's what you mean by "rouse on him") at a dog for barking or growling. You should NEVER tell a dog off for barking - and especially not for growling. Barking and growling are methods of verbal communication. Telling a dog off for growling is like taking the batteries out of a smoke alarm.
 

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It is against forum rules to promote the use of adversive training methods such as smacking. Plus, smacking a dog for toileting indoors only teaches the dog not to toilet in front of you, meaning there's an increased risk of the dog sneaking off to toilet. It doesn't teach the dog that the toiler is outside.

As for shouting (I assume that's what you mean by "rouse on him") at a dog for barking or growling. You should NEVER tell a dog off for barking - and especially not for growling. Barking and growling are methods of verbal communication. Telling a dog off for growling is like taking the batteries out of a smoke alarm.
Sorry, was not aware it was against forum rules. No, I did not mean shout at the dog. I mean rouse, as in speak sternly, to show you do not approve of what they are communicating, rather than telling them off.
 

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Sorry, was not aware it was against forum rules. No, I did not mean shout at the dog. I mean rouse, as in speak sternly, to show you do not approve of what they are communicating, rather than telling them off.
If you're speaking sternly to dogs, then by definition you are telling them off.
 
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Growling is a statement of a dog's emotional state. As such, it should not be reprimanded or punished for making that statement.

"Showing your disapproval" for that communication is like disapproving of your child stating her nightmare scared her. A person or dog's emotion to something is ALWAYS acceptable. Emotions are sacred. A person or dog's communication of that emotion is ALWAYS acceptable.

That communication allows you to help the person or dog work out the issue causing the emotion. That means realizing that a child needs help dealing with something. It may be as simple as showing the child that the monster under the bed is just the dog snoring or showing the dog that the scary noise is just the wind flapping the blind. It may be much more difficult as helping them overcome a past abuse.
 

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if you are not familiar with dog training and have limited time, it really might be a good idea to get help with this from a professional.
This is what I'd go with. You have a number of problems, and I'm guessing you haven't had much experience training dogs. Either you spend a year or two learning to train your dog by trial and error, or you solve the problem in a timely fashion by hiring a professional who knows how to train dogs. Since you have the landlord to consider, the second option sounds better.
 
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