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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,
Ozzy and Luna have been best freinds as soon as they met each other but Luna grew up to be the stereotypical mean little white dog. Whenever we walk luna she constantly pulls and relentlessly tries to atack the dogs. we love her but it’s really embarrassing to deal with this. Plus we are worried about her hurting another dog or getting hurt.

We recently boarded them at a kennel for spring break. We looked at photos of them and were pleasantly surprised to find photos of Luna with other dogs. we thought that she was a lost cause and a broken dog. But after that we had some hope. I especialy always had hope for luna. She is such a sweaty at home and she only gets crazy with certain people and all dogs. I have been taking her on walks, and holding her. I would let her sniff the nose of other dogs. ussualy she is fine but sometimes she growls and we walk away.

I think she was a puppy mill dog when looking back. We picked her up in Cupertino and the house was full of hundreds of dogs. It was the breeders freind and but that means they probably had similar breeding strategies. As a result it makes sense how she was afraid of dogs. Is it possible that she is trying to protect us and that’s why she is like that. Ozzy is old and when he is gone I don‘t want her to be lonely.

what strategies do you have to deal with this issue. She clearly is trainable. I just need to figure out how to deal with this,


thanks!!!

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At the kennel where she was boarded, was she off leash with the other dogs? That would have given her a lot more control over how close she was to the other dogs, and that itself can make a big difference.
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
At the kennel where she was boarded, was she off leash with the other dogs? That would have given her a lot more control over how close she was to the other dogs, and that itself can make a big difference.
We recently took her to the dog park and she was super docile and scared but she wasn’t violent. The main issue is walks. If she doesn’t like going to dog parks we probably won’t take her but we don’t want her to ruin things for Ozzy.
 

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We recently took her to the dog park and she was super docile and scared but she wasn’t violent. The main issue is walks. If she doesn’t like going to dog parks we probably won’t take her but we don’t want her to ruin things for Ozzy.
W can try to help you in supporting her to be more comfortable with other dogs, but it really would be more helpful to know more detail - for example, what was different about her interactions when she was with the other dogs when she was boarded. As I asked, was it different because she was off-leash, where normally she would be on-leash?
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
W can try to help you in supporting her to be more comfortable with other dogs, but it really would be more helpful to know more detail - for example, what was different about her interactions when she was with the other dogs when she was boarded. As I asked, was it different because she was off-leash, where normally she would be on-leash?
she would just hide behind me or mom and not let dogs sniff her
 

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she would just hide behind me or mom and not let dogs sniff her
OK, I'm still not clear what is happening.

When she
relentlessly tries to atack the dogs
is that when she is on lead, with you and you mother?

And if that is correct, when does
she would just hide behind me or mom and not let dogs sniff her
happen? And how does that develop into the relentless attacking?

Is there any pattern - like OK with small dogs, not OK with big dogs? OK with white dogs, not OK with black dogs? OK with females, not OK with males?

When the boarding facility sent you the pictures of her being ok with the other dogs, was she off leash in an enclosure? How many other dogs, what were they like?
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK, I'm still not clear what is happening.

When she is that when she is on lead, with you and you mother?

And if that is correct, when does happen? And how does that develop into the relentless attacking?

Is there any pattern - like OK with small dogs, not OK with big dogs? OK with white dogs, not OK with black dogs? OK with females, not OK with males?

When the boarding facility sent you the pictures of her being ok with the other dogs, was she off leash in an enclosure? How many other dogs, what were they like?
It’s very inconsistent. I think she hate little white dogs the most ironically. She also was super patient with Labrador puppies. She likes other smalll dogs like frenchies and bulldogs. She hates really big macho dogs. There realy isn’t a pattern, she barks at whatever she sees.

do you recommend socializing her with the next door dogs. Maybe a pack walk.
 

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do you recommend socializing her with the next door dogs. Maybe a pack walk.
No, not particularly. If she gets on well with that dog it might help to give her some confidence, but it isn't likely to actually fix the problem.

Frankly, you still haven't given us a lot of detail to work with. However, here are some suggestions.

Despite her behaviour, very few dogs really want to get into a fight. All of their instincts tell them not to - in the wild, the risk of injury is simply too great. In fact, aggressive behaviour is almost always rooted in fear.

By putting on a big display, your dog is trying to frighten off the other dog, her body language is saying 'I'm loud and big and scary, don't come close to me if you know what's good for you'. And almost always the other dog will retreat, or be taken away by his owner, so your dog's behaviour becomes reinforced. It worked, so she knows she can do it again.

This sort of behaviour often happens when your dog is on lead, which means that she has found herself closer to the other dog than she would have chosen if she had been able to.

She will have an invisible radius of space around her where she feels secure. It's called flight distance, anything within that space triggers her fight or flight stress response, which you may have heard of. Find out what that is and keep her far enough away from other dogs that she is aware of them, but relaxed. Your goal is to train that she doesn't need to react; not to stop a reaction in progress.

Reward her for being calm with something fabulous, like frankfurter sausage or a very special toy. The aim of this is to change your dog’s emotional response to the stressful thing (the other dog) by repeatedly pairing it with something good. In time, your dog will learn that scary dogs mean sausages appear and this creates something called a positive conditioned emotional response (+CER).

This website explains it in more detail - Care for Reactive Dogs

Gradually, over weeks and months rather than days, you can work on reducing the distance. This may mean you have to be selective where you walk - choose places with good visibility so you can give other dogs a wide berth, or where you can turn and walk away easily. But - be aware that if your dog has had a stressful episode the stress hormone cortisol can stay in the body for some time. Studies in dogs are inconclusive but it may be several days. The distance she was comfortable with on one day might be too close on another day. So the safe distance can change, watch her body language.

Alongside that you could train a 'watch me'. As your dog looks at you, mark and reward the behaviour. Ask for longer periods of watching. Then if a dog approaches, after you have worked on the distance issue, you can get your dog to focus on you and not the other dog. BUT - some dogs find this scary as they cannot see the thing they are anxious about so you need to judge your dog. And importantly, don't ask your dog to watch you if it is the other dog that is reactive. Your dog should never be in a situation where she could be at risk while she is complying with something you have asked her to do.

Trainers describe behaviour like this with reference to the three Ds. Distance, as above but also be aware of Duration - your dog might be tolerant for 10 seconds, but not 15; and Distraction - how distracting the stimulus is, a calm dog might not trigger any reaction at a given distance but a bouncy one might.

In addition, the conformation (shape) or even colour of some dogs can trigger a reaction. Very broad fronted dogs (such as mastiffs or bulldogs) create the impression of 'facing up' just because of their shape, which can be intimidating even if their temperament is perfect. And black dogs are thought to have facial body language that is harder to read. Some dogs will be more reactive to un-neutered males, or particular breeds for no apparent reason. Learn what triggers reactions in your dog so that you can give her the extra support she needs.
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No, not particularly. If she gets on well with that dog it might help to give her some confidence, but it isn't likely to actually fix the problem.

Frankly, you still haven't given us a lot of detail to work with. However, here are some suggestions.

Despite her behaviour, very few dogs really want to get into a fight. All of their instincts tell them not to - in the wild, the risk of injury is simply too great. In fact, aggressive behaviour is almost always rooted in fear.

By putting on a big display, your dog is trying to frighten off the other dog, her body language is saying 'I'm loud and big and scary, don't come close to me if you know what's good for you'. And almost always the other dog will retreat, or be taken away by his owner, so your dog's behaviour becomes reinforced. It worked, so she knows she can do it again.

This sort of behaviour often happens when your dog is on lead, which means that she has found herself closer to the other dog than she would have chosen if she had been able to.

She will have an invisible radius of space around her where she feels secure. It's called flight distance, anything within that space triggers her fight or flight stress response, which you may have heard of. Find out what that is and keep her far enough away from other dogs that she is aware of them, but relaxed. Your goal is to train that she doesn't need to react; not to stop a reaction in progress.

Reward her for being calm with something fabulous, like frankfurter sausage or a very special toy. The aim of this is to change your dog’s emotional response to the stressful thing (the other dog) by repeatedly pairing it with something good. In time, your dog will learn that scary dogs mean sausages appear and this creates something called a positive conditioned emotional response (+CER).

This website explains it in more detail - Care for Reactive Dogs

Gradually, over weeks and months rather than days, you can work on reducing the distance. This may mean you have to be selective where you walk - choose places with good visibility so you can give other dogs a wide berth, or where you can turn and walk away easily. But - be aware that if your dog has had a stressful episode the stress hormone cortisol can stay in the body for some time. Studies in dogs are inconclusive but it may be several days. The distance she was comfortable with on one day might be too close on another day. So the safe distance can change, watch her body language.

Alongside that you could train a 'watch me'. As your dog looks at you, mark and reward the behaviour. Ask for longer periods of watching. Then if a dog approaches, after you have worked on the distance issue, you can get your dog to focus on you and not the other dog. BUT - some dogs find this scary as they cannot see the thing they are anxious about so you need to judge your dog. And importantly, don't ask your dog to watch you if it is the other dog that is reactive. Your dog should never be in a situation where she could be at risk while she is complying with something you have asked her to do.

Trainers describe behaviour like this with reference to the three Ds. Distance, as above but also be aware of Duration - your dog might be tolerant for 10 seconds, but not 15; and Distraction - how distracting the stimulus is, a calm dog might not trigger any reaction at a given distance but a bouncy one might.

In addition, the conformation (shape) or even colour of some dogs can trigger a reaction. Very broad fronted dogs (such as mastiffs or bulldogs) create the impression of 'facing up' just because of their shape, which can be intimidating even if their temperament is perfect. And black dogs are thought to have facial body language that is harder to read. Some dogs will be more reactive to un-neutered males, or particular breeds for no apparent reason. Learn what triggers reactions in your dog so that you can give her the extra support she needs.

is there a way to post a video of this happenin. Maybe that will help
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No, not particularly. If she gets on well with that dog it might help to give her some confidence, but it isn't likely to actually fix the problem.

Frankly, you still haven't given us a lot of detail to work with. However, here are some suggestions.

Despite her behaviour, very few dogs really want to get into a fight. All of their instincts tell them not to - in the wild, the risk of injury is simply too great. In fact, aggressive behaviour is almost always rooted in fear.

By putting on a big display, your dog is trying to frighten off the other dog, her body language is saying 'I'm loud and big and scary, don't come close to me if you know what's good for you'. And almost always the other dog will retreat, or be taken away by his owner, so your dog's behaviour becomes reinforced. It worked, so she knows she can do it again.

This sort of behaviour often happens when your dog is on lead, which means that she has found herself closer to the other dog than she would have chosen if she had been able to.

She will have an invisible radius of space around her where she feels secure. It's called flight distance, anything within that space triggers her fight or flight stress response, which you may have heard of. Find out what that is and keep her far enough away from other dogs that she is aware of them, but relaxed. Your goal is to train that she doesn't need to react; not to stop a reaction in progress.

Reward her for being calm with something fabulous, like frankfurter sausage or a very special toy. The aim of this is to change your dog’s emotional response to the stressful thing (the other dog) by repeatedly pairing it with something good. In time, your dog will learn that scary dogs mean sausages appear and this creates something called a positive conditioned emotional response (+CER).

This website explains it in more detail - Care for Reactive Dogs

Gradually, over weeks and months rather than days, you can work on reducing the distance. This may mean you have to be selective where you walk - choose places with good visibility so you can give other dogs a wide berth, or where you can turn and walk away easily. But - be aware that if your dog has had a stressful episode the stress hormone cortisol can stay in the body for some time. Studies in dogs are inconclusive but it may be several days. The distance she was comfortable with on one day might be too close on another day. So the safe distance can change, watch her body language.

Alongside that you could train a 'watch me'. As your dog looks at you, mark and reward the behaviour. Ask for longer periods of watching. Then if a dog approaches, after you have worked on the distance issue, you can get your dog to focus on you and not the other dog. BUT - some dogs find this scary as they cannot see the thing they are anxious about so you need to judge your dog. And importantly, don't ask your dog to watch you if it is the other dog that is reactive. Your dog should never be in a situation where she could be at risk while she is complying with something you have asked her to do.

Trainers describe behaviour like this with reference to the three Ds. Distance, as above but also be aware of Duration - your dog might be tolerant for 10 seconds, but not 15; and Distraction - how distracting the stimulus is, a calm dog might not trigger any reaction at a given distance but a bouncy one might.

In addition, the conformation (shape) or even colour of some dogs can trigger a reaction. Very broad fronted dogs (such as mastiffs or bulldogs) create the impression of 'facing up' just because of their shape, which can be intimidating even if their temperament is perfect. And black dogs are thought to have facial body language that is harder to read. Some dogs will be more reactive to un-neutered males, or particular breeds for no apparent reason. Learn what triggers reactions in your dog so that you can give her the extra support she needs.
 

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She certainly doesn't look comfortable, well done that German Shepherd for nor responding.

You still haven't told us what different conditions there were when she was boarded so I suggest you follow the advice in post #8.

I'd also get her into a well fitting harness, I'd be concerned about trachea damage with her pulling like that.
 

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Ozzy Luna
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
She certainly doesn't look comfortable, well done that German Shepherd for nor responding.

You still haven't told us what different conditions there were when she was boarded so I suggest you follow the advice in post #8.

I'd also get her into a well fitting harness, I'd be concerned about trachea damage with her pulling like that.
should we call tail Heaven and ask about Luna. She often hates small and big dogs. once she is off leash she starts to act better but we don’t want trouble. Whenever I walk her though she doesn’t pull but she still barks. She knows I’m no softy like mom.
 

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should we call tail Heaven and ask about Luna. She often hates small and big dogs. once she is off leash she starts to act better but we don’t want trouble. Whenever I walk her though she doesn’t pull but she still barks. She knows I’m no softy like mom.
I'm sorry, I really don't understand what you are saying here.

If she is uncomfortable around other dogs, first give her distance. See post #8 above.
 
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