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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a close friend who is currently living with a friend who is quite frankly, an immature and irresponsible dog owner. One of her dogs had an oops litter (although from what I've heard she might have planned it) of currently 9 pups. The puppies are Shepherd/Lab mixes from what I've gathered. Well either way, my friend wants to keep one of the puppies (2.5 weeks old) she has bonded with. Like many people these days she wants to train this dog to be a service dog or emotional support, as she has multiple mental illnesses. She said the puppy has already started responding to her emotions and wants to know what else she can do to socialize and train her. Now while I've already reamed the friend she's stayed with on responsible dog ownership (and she said she's already taken the infant puppies on "errands!" :confused:) my friend is now in the unique position of being able to socialize a potential service dog almost from birth.

When she asked me what to do I suggested she gently squeeze and touch the puppy's paws to build up tolerance of having her feet touched, and play sounds like from traffic and all sorts of things. I also said when she can let her climb and stand on all difference surfaces, stairs, etc. I also said to wear all manner of different clothing around the puppy. And I made sure to tell her not to force the puppy to cuddle her if she tries to get away. (She has some boundary issues and sometimes doesn't even do well with this when it comes to people.) Other than that I said she just needs to learn to be a dog from her mom and siblings.

But does anyone have any other suggestions of what should be done to a very young puppy that might help her chances of being a service dog? Also keep in mind I'm mildly concerned about the puppy's exposure to disease, because while the owner of the mother dog did get them their first shots/visit to the vet, one puppy already died.
 

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So I have a close friend who is currently living with a friend who is quite frankly, an immature and irresponsible dog owner. One of her dogs had an oops litter (although from what I've heard she might have planned it) of currently 9 pups. The puppies are Shepherd/Lab mixes from what I've gathered. Well either way, my friend wants to keep one of the puppies (2.5 weeks old) she has bonded with. Like many people these days she wants to train this dog to be a service dog or emotional support, as she has multiple mental illnesses. She said the puppy has already started responding to her emotions and wants to know what else she can do to socialize and train her. Now while I've already reamed the friend she's stayed with on responsible dog ownership (and she said she's already taken the infant puppies on "errands!" :confused:) my friend is now in the unique position of being able to socialize a potential service dog almost from birth.

When she asked me what to do I suggested she gently squeeze and touch the puppy's paws to build up tolerance of having her feet touched, and play sounds like from traffic and all sorts of things. I also said when she can let her climb and stand on all difference surfaces, stairs, etc. I also said to wear all manner of different clothing around the puppy. And I made sure to tell her not to force the puppy to cuddle her if she tries to get away. (She has some boundary issues and sometimes doesn't even do well with this when it comes to people.) Other than that I said she just needs to learn to be a dog from her mom and siblings.

But does anyone have any other suggestions of what should be done to a very young puppy that might help her chances of being a service dog? Also keep in mind I'm mildly concerned about the puppy's exposure to disease, because while the owner of the mother dog did get them their first shots/visit to the vet, one puppy already died.
I don't think that puppies need shots at 2 1/2 weeks. I also think that 'reaming' people is not fruitful. If you want to help these puppies, I suggest offering friendship and information to the owner. Once you establish a bond, it will be easier to help both your friend and her friend, and the puppies. Use the same basic step by step, friendly interaction with the people as you would use with the pups. Good for you for trying to help, I wish the surviving puppies the very best.
 

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I don't think that puppies need shots at 2 1/2 weeks. I also think that 'reaming' people is not fruitful. If you want to help these puppies, I suggest offering friendship and information to the owner. Once you establish a bond, it will be easier to help both your friend and her friend, and the puppies. Use the same basic step by step, friendly interaction with the people as you would use with the pups. Good for you for trying to help, I wish the surviving puppies the very best.
You are correct, puppies do not "need" shots are 2.5 weeks old, in fact, they are useless because of maternal antibodies which will neutralize the antigens in the shot, and by vaccinating a very young, very tiny puppy you are putting them at a very high risk of vaccination injuring. Bad, bad idea.
@Lucille I also agree with the rest of your sentiments.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It was just a check up they went for then. I'm getting the info second hand and I guess the friend I have assumed they were getting some kind of vases. I've never had newborns so I'm not really up on the vax schedule that young.

Also the word 'reamed' was probably too harsh. I confronted the girl, and mostly because I saw her bidding on puppy mill Cocker Spaniels while she's got 9 puppies and two adult dogs at home. I did take a more educational approach but I was angry at the time so that's why that word came to mind. I did actually end up helping her deal with the impending death of her elderly Cocker Spaniel. But either way it's worrying because she has the potential to be an animal hoarder with all the animals she currently has, and was seeking out more.
 

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Maybe you can get in contact with a group or someone who trains dogs from puppies to adult hood for therapy purposes. Does she want the puppy to be certified? I think and I could be wrong that she might need to go through a program to get certified but I have very limited knoladge on the specifics. I agree with your early socialization advice but I think (again could be wrong) they tend to really start at 8 months. Giving the puppy time to as you said learn to be a dog and devlope their new senses (around 2 weeks is when they open their eyes and ears so I don't know the specifics of how well they can see or hear at the moment) But I think starting to get the puppy used to being handled and touched couldn't hurt.
 

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@Gnostic Dog @Lucille Have you raised litters of puppies? If so what health care would you suggest for the puppies? I'm kind of concerned because today she said they were taken outside and "exploring". I think they might actually be 3 weeks old but still I think that's way too young to be outside. And if you know any other members who know more about rearing new puppies let me know. I know some basics but obviously not that much.

Also I have started talking to the other girl (she also has many mental health problems) and hopefully she'll get all these dogs proper care and spay the mother afterwards. She clearly loves her dogs but just doesn't get how all the puppies she's "giving to family and friends" are contributing to pet overpopulation.
 

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Tracie there does seem to be a problem if they went to the vet with 2 1/2 week old puppies and were not given advice. Did they actually go? If so, try to determine what was said or what they remember.
There are many sites including this one that will give particulars as to a puppy's first year that you can print off and give to the owner.

The puppies she is giving away are not contributing to pet overpopulation more than any other dog. It is the owners that do that. A well loved, well cared for mixed breed pup that is spayed or neutered when it is time by owners who understand the facts of life and pet overpopulation can be outstanding pets.
 

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Thanks. She's now really pissed at me because I'm judging how she treats her dogs. I guess my friend said to her that I thought it was a bad idea to take them outside now. So I don't think anything I say will matter unless it's specific things for my friend and her potential service dog. We were both just really upsetting each other and I was getting super frustrated because I'm having a bad day. I wish she would just do something like foster mother dogs if she likes raising puppies. But at this point I'm pretty sure she'll get upset at anything I say.

@Lucille Apparently this is actually the third or fourth litter she's bred from her dog and I don't believe the puppies are neutered. That most definitely contributes some to pet overpopulation.
 

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It's not a bad idea to take them "outside of their den," it's a horrible one. Puppies that young can't regulate their temps correctly which means any fluctuation in outside temp can cause hyper or hypothermia. They can also become hypo glycemic quickly and dehydrated. Keeping them at home with mother is the best option. The first few weeks are all about survival, so let the momma dog do what she's supposed to do, socialization can wait until they're older.

They also may have mother's immunity, that's if she was vaccinated if not then no immunity at all, so it's pointless to vaccinate a puppy younger than 8 weeks of age. Normal protocol is 8, 12, and 16 weeks (rabies given at this time, unless there are concerns with reactions).
 

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@Lucille Apparently this is actually the third or fourth litter she's bred from her dog and I don't believe the puppies are neutered. That most definitely contributes some to pet overpopulation.
It is her irresponsible behavior to keep on allowing this dog to have puppies, that of course contributes to overpopulation.
However, giving the existing puppies away to responsible homes, neutered or not, will not contribute to pet overpopulation. A responsible owner would not permit chance breedings.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It is her irresponsible behavior to keep on allowing this dog to have puppies, that of course contributes to overpopulation.
However, giving the existing puppies away to responsible homes, neutered or not, will not contribute to pet overpopulation. A responsible owner would not permit chance breedings.
I just found out today she's actually selling the puppies to strangers on Facebook. So that's even worse. Ugh. I doubt they'll be neutered when they leave her and who knows who the hell these people are.
 

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I'm getting the info second hand
It seems as if a lot of the info you are getting may be unreliable, like the report on the shots. If the vet visit happened, at least someone was responsible enough to pay for that.
I just found out today she's actually selling the puppies to strangers on Facebook. So that's even worse. Ugh. I doubt they'll be neutered when they leave her and who knows who the hell these people are.
Again, I'm not sure you are getting accurate info. It is irresponsible to keep on breeding the dog, but the existing puppies have to find a home. People on Facebook are not automatically bad homes, it is up to the new owner to be responsible. Neutering is not a requirement, for responsible ownership, only that the owner takes care not to allow a breeding..

There is a lot of irresponsible dog ownership going around these days. But there are also a lot of caring owners. I hope the pups get caring homes, and that this dog does not become pregnant again.
 
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