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Hi, I'm a new member and this is my first post. I have two neutered male dogs that are 2 1/2 years old. One is a Husky and the other is a Weimaraner. We've had them both since eight weeks and the Weimeraner has always tried to be more dominant. I thought they would just work it out but the more I let him be dominant the more territorial he got with growling and once a nip. So now I have to think through every interaction to make sure that I am not giving the Weim cues to reinforce more dominance, like who goes outside first, goes down the stairs first, who gets fed first. It's exhausting. One thing I really miss is snuggle time with the Weim. I would love to let him up on the couch or bed with me but the few times I've done that he will start growling at the Husky if he comes nearby. Will it always be like this? Help please!
 

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You have to show your dogs that YOU are in charge, not them. You need to intercede and not allow this. Also stop all affection to either dog until resolved. Affection is not FREE! Make them earn it! No on the bed, no on the couch, in the crate at night.

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Welcome to Dog Forum! Sorry you're having some conflict between your pups.

I'd forget about trying to establish or maintain dominance between the dogs. Treat them fairly, train them well (using rewards-based methods), and it will work out.

I'd suggest finding a good rewards-based trainer to work with you and your dogs. Finding a Trainer, Behavior Consultant, or Behaviorist

It sounds as though your weim could be resource guarding you or the sofa / bed. Jean Donaldson's books Mine! and Fight! would be good resources to review until you can meet with someone. Mine! is about resource guarding between dogs and humans and Fight! is about conflicts - including resource guarding - between dogs.

Patricia McConnell has good information on multi-household dogs, too. (this is good: Peace, Patience, & Pack Politics: Forget “Alpha”--the rules of
group living apply to all
).

It's a little late, but you might want to read about raising two puppies at once, Double Trouble. Two Puppies At Once

Also, you'll find more good info in the Training and Behavior Stickies
 

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Yeah this isn't dominance, this is littermate syndrome pure and simple. Luckily there's no fancy way to approach it, just train as you would with any other resource-guarding dog. You might benefit from seeking professional help so that you can come up with a cohesive plan for daily life with litter mates and have a game plan for any problems hat crop up in the future. The APDT website and the PPG (pet professional guild) both have good directories for trainers. The books cookieface mentioned are also brilliant (if not fairly dense, concentrated) resources.
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Also stop all affection to either dog until resolved. Affection is not FREE!
While praise and affection given immediately after desired behavior is a powerful tool, it is effective because it is positive and given immediately following the desired behavior.
I do not think that dogs understand long periods of no affection. People don't even understand this. It is a common complaint from husbands that their wives are mad at them and they don't know why, and are expected to know why. Neither a person or a dog can read minds. Successful training is made up of small, easily understood steps delivered in a positive environment where the dog looks forward to learning.
 
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