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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a dog breed that exhibits most of these traits. All suggestions welcome :)!

Physical:
- small (>20 pounds)
- quiet
- little to no shedding or drooling

Temperament:
- can be left alone with no anxiety or destructive tendencies
- minimal prey drive, not high-energy
- friendly and amiable towards people, animals and kids

It's okay if it only fits some of these requirements, I'm just looking for ideas.
Let me know what you think!
 

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Sounds like U'd rather have an Ibo...

I'm looking for a dog breed that exhibits most of these traits. All suggestions welcome :)!

Physical:
- small (>20 pounds)
- quiet
- little to no shedding or drooling

Temperament:
- can be left alone with no anxiety or destructive tendencies
- minimal prey drive, not high-energy
- friendly and amiable towards people, animals and kids


It's okay if it only fits some of these requirements, I'm just looking for ideas.
Let me know what you think!
I think U're asking for an awful lot, in one package. ;)

The 2nd set of traits are, by & large, the things one TEACHES a dog. Few breeds are 'inherently' destructive; all pups explore the world with their teeth, just as all human infants stick everything into their mouths. It's a stage; to get thru it unscarred, U police the house, set up puppy-safe zones, supervise, & have a shipping-crate for overnite & other unsupervised times.

All dogs are to a degree, predatory; just about any pup will chase a ball, which is only one step away from chasing any live fleeing critter. Teaching them self-control & introducing them to the other species they are expected to tolerate or accept as family, is part of socialization.
I wouldn't ask a JRT or any terrierrrist to make friends with a gerbil; that's expecting miracles. But *most* dogs easily learn that chickens, cats, horses, etc, aren't for chasing, & *most* dogs can be taught that deer aren't to be chased, either. // When in doubt, leash the dog. :thumbsup:

"high energy"? - Don't get dogs from working-lines; no hunting-Labs, no varmint-JRTs, no working-Cockers.
Stick to pet-lines, show-lines, or companion breeds. // Shih-Tzu were never meant to "do" anything; they're generally playful, & fairly laid-back.
Also, if a given pup seems not to have an off-switch, INSTALL ONE. Teach the pup that indoors isn't for craziness; give them calm things to do, so their time is occupied.

As for "friendly & amiable", U teach that - socialization begins the day U bring the pup or dog home; if U want an already-friendly, tolerant dog, i'd get A YOUNG ADULT who's already been well-socialized, from a rescue or shelter.
A 9 to 12-MO dog is past the challenges of puphood, & if s/he is obviously friendly & sociable, yer good to go. // Their size, coat type, etc, will all be there, assessable - temperament, too.

Pups are bundles of potential; one pup can grow-up to be a serial killer, another can become valedictorian of their class & run for office as the Popular Party candidate.
A young adult is WYSIWYG - What Ya See is What Ya Get. Plus, most of them are UTD on vax, & already S/N, when they leave a shelter or rescue for an adoptive home.

- terry


 

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"Little to no shedding"...

... is also known as 'Mandatory grooming'. :p

Dogs can do one of 2 things: shed dead hair out into the environs, or shed dead hair into their new coat.

Wire-haired dogs shed a little into the environs, & a lot into the incoming coat. They'll mat badly if neglected. They can be hand-stripped readily, & once established, such coats are easy to maintain at home - they are harder-textured than clippered wire coats, & mud will dry & fall right off them.
They won't need to go to the groomers' every 6-weeks all their lives, if U hand-strip them yerself.

Curly-coated dogs can be soft & fluffy, or crisp & wavy; the fluffy curls, like Poodles, will tangle & mat horribly if neglected. // However, like wire-coats, there are options: COMB THEM to the skin frequently, as in 3 or 4 times weekly minimum, & take them to the groomer every 6-weeks religiously for their lifespan, OR... give them a corded coat, & DIY the bathing. They will never need to be combed, brushed, or clippered; use blunt-tipped scissors to cut any burrs, etc, out of the cords, & just twiddle the growing hair into the cords as it emerges from the skin, leaving 1/4 to 1/2-inch loose at the skin, so it doesn't pull painfully.
A 4-inch long fringe of narrow cords is cute, washes easily, dries quickly, & is easy to keep looking good.


Single-coats of silky hair, with no undercoat, are often of indeterminate length: they will grow indefinitely, just like the hair on yer head. And they'll tangle, too - just like neglected hair; making dreadlocks & witch's knots that will never comb out, they must be split carefully so as not to hurt the dog, & the cut mat must then be gently combed out of the hair.
Maltese are among the breeds with this coat-type.


HAIRLESS breeds still require quite a lot of care - they need frequent baths [at least weekly] to remove the oils that would normally move from skin to hair, & keep the hair glossy & supple.
They need SKIN protection from sunburn, insect-bites, chafing, etc - they're bald, tender-skinned, & have nothing to protect them. // Clothing is mandatory for hairless dogs in cold climes; not cute dresses or jokey biker-jackets with rivet trim, but warm properly-insulated coats to cover their bodies & torsos, leaving only the groin & butt open for toilet purposes.


Personally? -
I'd suggest an American Hairless; preferably an adult, from a rescue. There should be a national breed-club rescue in the U-S.
The breed is a sport [naturally-occurring mutation] of the Smooth Fox Terrier; they have no missing teeth, & are not a lethal-factor breed; other hairless breeds require that hairless individuals be bred to HAIRED dogs, to avoid stillbirths, congenital deformities, etc; American Hairless can safely be bred baldy to baldy, no worries.

- terry

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. The 2nd set of traits are, by & large, the things one TEACHES a dog.

2. I wouldn't ask a JRT or any terrierrrist to make friends with a gerbil; that's expecting miracles. But *most* dogs easily learn that chickens, cats, horses, etc, aren't for chasing, & *most* dogs can be taught that deer aren't to be chased, either. // When in doubt, leash the dog. :thumbsup:

3. "high energy"? - Don't get dogs from working-lines; no hunting-Labs, no varmint-JRTs, no working-Cockers.
Stick to pet-lines, show-lines, or companion breeds. // Shih-Tzu were never meant to "do" anything; they're generally playful, & fairly laid-back.
Also, if a given pup seems not to have an off-switch, INSTALL ONE. Teach the pup that indoors isn't for craziness; give them calm things to do, so their time is occupied.

4. Pups are bundles of potential; one pup can grow-up to be a serial killer, another can become valedictorian of their class & run for office as the Popular Party candidate.
A young adult is WYSIWYG - What Ya See is What Ya Get. Plus, most of them are UTD on vax, & already S/N, when they leave a shelter or rescue for an adoptive home.

- terry
1. That make sense, now that you mention it. I'm thinking of adopting an adult dog, so I'll have to see what their individual personality and temperament is.

2. "terrierrrist" lol. I'll have to avoid those. Should have known; they're called "rat terriers" for a reason :p. And if I introduce the dog to the animals, they should get along, personality-permitting?

3.Thanks, this makes a lot of sense!

4.I love the exaggeration :p! Seems like I'll be sticking with an adult, so I know what to expect.

Thanks for the info!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Personally? -
I'd suggest an American Hairless; preferably an adult, from a rescue. There should be a national breed-club rescue in the U-S.
The breed is a sport [naturally-occurring mutation] of the Smooth Fox Terrier; they have no missing teeth, & are not a lethal-factor breed; other hairless breeds require that hairless individuals be bred to HAIRED dogs, to avoid stillbirths, congenital deformities, etc; American Hairless can safely be bred baldy to baldy, no worries.

- terry
I'm glad they don't have that missing teeth link in their genes!
But, two problems:
Terrier- dun dun dun :p
And I don't think I'm looking to adopt a hairless dog.

Nevertheless, all that detailed info on coats! Thanks a lot :)
 

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check these cuties out...

they're not a typical terrier - if they were, i wouldn't recommend them. :D

Also, i was wrong about the parent breed- they're a RAT Terrier sport, not a variant of 'smooth Fox'.

American Hairless Terrier - Dog Breed | PetsLand
1 year ago . 8,269 views
The foremother of the American Hairless Terrier was born in 1972 in a litter of a perfectly ordinary average-sized Rat Terrier.

4:13
Incredibly Playful American Hairless Terrier
Jon Carson
9 months ago . 2,835 views

2:47
American Hairless Terrier - Henry.
00jessehardy
4 years ago . 14,467 views
Me and Henry messing around.

I've worked with several clients' dogs who were AHTs, & they were wonderful - friendly, calm but curious, playful, & great fun to train.

The Rat Terrier is the 'haired' version. :)
- terry

 

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My sister has a Rat Terrier that she competes in Agility with. They are a very sweet natured dog, not at all like other terriers. They are great companion dogs with hardly any grooming as their hair is very short. They are not at all yappy dogs, my niece has one also.
 
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