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Hi, I am a research student and I merely have a small room to live. Yes I can walk with my dog o daily basis but most of the time in a day, it will be alone in the room. But I do want to adopt a puppy, I love them! Should I go forward? or should I wait for my degree to finish? Please advise.
 

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If you want to go forward, I'd recommend a small older dog... they'll probably sleep most of the time you're gone anyway and they often are overlooked for adoption. I think that's where your selection should focus. But I don't think you being a research student with a small apartment should prevent you from getting a dog. Just be realistic.
 

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I don't know how small your apartment is, mine is 800 sq ft, I adopted a 4 month old coon hound beagle mix, she is now about 9 months old, 30lbs and as tall as a golden retriever. She gets walked everyday and most days she goes to the dog park for about and hour. I find people to watch her while I am in class, or at work or at my internship; she isn't alone for more than 4 hours a day. She does fine but she is pretty low energy for a puppy. You can definitely make it work but it is a lot of work, and expensive.
 

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I would echo Holly's recommendation that an adult dog, smaller, and already mature/calm might be a more sensible option. Shelters are full of such dogs who need homes. You could save a life, and gain a best friend. ;)

Puppies are entirely different creatures in their needs and activity levels, and the amount of work they take.
 

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I would echo Holly's recommendation that an adult dog, smaller, and already mature/calm might be a more sensible option. Shelters are full of such dogs who need homes. You could save a life, and gain a best friend. ;)

Puppies are entirely different creatures in their needs and activity levels, and the amount of work they take.
I agree with this too. And it would great if the OP adopted a black dog as they're put to sleep more than other dogs.
Black Dog Syndrome

An older dog is house trained and that is big plus!
 

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Great Advice!!

I agree with this too. And it would great if the OP adopted a black dog as they're put to sleep more than other dogs.
Black Dog Syndrome

An older dog is house trained and that is big plus!
I can safely say that I have adopted 5 older minpins (all black) in the last 3 years, all housetrained, all have great personalities, and also an older
Italian Greyhound, also black by the way. (Thanks for pointing that out, these guys really need our love, as they seem to be second class furbabies)
 

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I can safely say that I have adopted 5 older minpins (all black) in the last 3 years, all housetrained, all have great personalities, and also an older
Italian Greyhound, also black by the way. (Thanks for pointing that out, these guys really need our love, as they seem to be second class furbabies)
My last dog was a black Standard Poodle and he was a big loving goof ball of a dog! Yet people where afraid of him because he was a black dog.
 

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Thanks to all of you for such responses. Can you also indicate which kind of breed I should go for? I live in India and some breeds are really costly for me here. So, is it okay if I adopt an Indian breed/mongral? What sort of things should I watch out for before adoption or what things I have to learn to take proper care of it?
 

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There is nothing wrong with a mongrel! Choose a dog based on the personality that appeals to you. I suppose you are looking for a mature, fairly sedate dog. It might be hard to fully evaluate what the dog will be like in the shelter setting though.
 

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Goes India have lots of greyhound racing? If you can, you may want to look into a greyhound rescue - they place the dogs that no longer race. If you want a smaller dog, they often have italian greyhounds and whippets as well.

Greyhounds are usually calm and sedate. They are often called the world's fastest couch potato.
 

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I was honestly not aware of the temperament of grey hounds before I found this forum, I have read this a few times since joining. I have a feeling that my next dog may be a retired greyhound once I get out of school. Just wanted to say thanks to everyone for breaking that stereotype.
 
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^^ Continue to do your research though. Some are terrible off leash (want to chase everything) and some are terrible with small animals (same reason).

In a dog-only household without teeny dogs, they'd be wonderful. Obviously there are exceptions but be aware that a cat in the house may not be a good idea...
 

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My pup is the same way, she is terrible off leash, chases everything, she used to stalk my hamster. I would find her just staring into the cage
 

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I rented a room recently for three months and my 3 year old chihuahua did fine

I think your biggest concern shouldnt be size or age but separation anxiety!!! If the dog gets frantic and destroys the doors and walls when you leave or screams. That doeant work. SA does not descriminate based on age breed or energy level.

My cat has SA and actually chewed up the door frame and carpet!! Dog just watched

So you best bet is an adult dog who isnt going to wig out when you leave. Small is good for obvious reasons.
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As someone who has lived in a house, apartment and basement suite with a large 80lb dog - for sure a house is easiest. However, she would typically follow me around wherever I was so the actual amount of space didn't really matter. She also had couple of "beds" which were her retreats. We have fostered a number of different dogs in our apartment since my old girl passed. I think living in an apartment forces you not to be complacent about dog ownership. We have a sunny patio so there is outdoor space but in terms of exercise - it all occurs outdoors and is a shared experience between ourselves and our dogs. tossing a ball or letting them out to pee just doesn't cut it. Of course, if we could afford to own a house we would, but it is not a reality for us, so we have an apartment and a dog. It seems ok for us. Oh and some of the fosters have been small but also insanely high energy (read OCD-ADHD dog) so I think it comes down to the individual in terms of whehter it is a good fit. The size, breed, housing is all part of the equation.
 
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