Dog Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1 year old huskie/collie mix and a 5 year old Jack Russell mix. For about 11 months they were fine with only 1 minor fight over a bone. The past 2 days though they have had 2 fights. One over food and one over a play fight going too far. It is my observation that the husky mix tries to play roughly all the time and I think the other dog has had enough. There are times they are both into it but lately the husky goes too far. I should mention that the husky is crate trained while the other dog isn’t. Probably is left in the crate too long which I know can create aggression. So my question is do I need to rehome one of them or is it something that can be fixed
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,267 Posts
The fighting might be manageable, but you would need to supervise them more closely over food, toys etc and also step in to stop play before it becomes too rough.

Gender is also relevant, are they male/female, entire/neutered?

How much time does the husky spend in the crate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Both female and both fixed. As far as outside time I’d say an hour a day. Husky in the crate 8 plus hours a day due to work and can’t trust both dogs out. The husky is a nipper and idk if she’s trying to herd the other dog with some of the play
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
It may be kinder to rehome the husky.
No dog should be caged for 8 hours plus a day, and then only probably one hour outside! It's no wonder that the husky is causing a problem.
Rabbits and cavies in cages is one thing, but an intelligent and social animal such as a dog should not spend so much time locked away in a cage for human convenience.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
443 Posts
Both female and both fixed. As far as outside time I’d say an hour a day. Husky in the crate 8 plus hours a day due to work and can’t trust both dogs out. The husky is a nipper and idk if she’s trying to herd the other dog with some of the play
Hi. Welcome.

8 hours a day is too long for a dog to be crated - especially without breaks. Could a relative or friend pet sit for you so the husky mix isn't spending so much time in the crate?

On top of that, an hour a day should be a minimum IMHO, unless you do some form of training and engage their brains. What do they get in terms of enrichment? (Training/play/scentwork/boredom breakers such as kongs or other treat dispenser toys/1-2-1 time with you?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi. Welcome.

8 hours a day is too long for a dog to be crated - especially without breaks. Could a relative or friend pet sit for you so the husky mix isn't spending so much time in the crate?

On top of that, an hour a day should be a minimum IMHO, unless you do some form of training and engage their brains. What do they get in terms of enrichment? (Training/play/scentwork/boredom breakers such as kongs or other treat dispenser toys/1-2-1 time with you?)
We play fetch and tug of war. I don’t wanna get rid of her just have done this because she in a puppy stage and will literally eat everything. When I’m at work I can’t have her eating the pillows
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
443 Posts
We play fetch and tug of war. I don’t wanna get rid of her just have done this because she in a puppy stage and will literally eat everything. When I’m at work I can’t have her eating the pillows
Fetch and Tug o' War doesn't engage her brain that much. I was thinking more in terms of Find It, (treats) Hide and Seek, (you/another human) "Where is. . .?" (Objects) Teaching her the names of items, Puzzle Box or Snuffle mats, trick training. Maybe even dog sports like agility, Flyball, HTM (Heelwork to Music).

She's chewing pillows etc because she's bored out of her skull and at 1 year old, could be in the middle of the teenager stage, which is when dogs become brats. I know you're trying to keep her safe, as well as stopping her from destroying the house, but if the only option is to crate her while you're at work, it's not much of a life for her. Is she crated at night, too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Fetch and Tug o' War doesn't engage her brain that much. I was thinking more in terms of Find It, (treats) Hide and Seek, (you/another human) "Where is. . .?" (Objects) Teaching her the names of items, Puzzle Box or Snuffle mats, trick training. Maybe even dog sports like agility, Flyball, HTM (Heelwork to Music).

She's chewing pillows etc because she's bored out of her skull and at 1 year old, could be in the middle of the teenager stage, which is when dogs become brats. I know you're trying to keep her safe, as well as stopping her from destroying the house, but if the only option is to crate her while you're at work, it's not much of a life for her. Is she crated at night, too?
No at night she cuddles with me all night she’sa very affectionate dog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Fetch and Tug o' War doesn't engage her brain that much. I was thinking more in terms of Find It, (treats) Hide and Seek, (you/another human) "Where is. . .?" (Objects) Teaching her the names of items, Puzzle Box or Snuffle mats, trick training. Maybe even dog sports like agility, Flyball, HTM (Heelwork to Music).

She's chewing pillows etc because she's bored out of her skull and at 1 year old, could be in the middle of the teenager stage, which is when dogs become brats. I know you're trying to keep her safe, as well as stopping her from destroying the house, but if the only option is to crate her while you're at work, it's not much of a life for her. Is she crated at night, too?
Yes. This also could be separation anxiety, considering she is an affectionate doggo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Ok I can work on everything with the husky. My only question is can I trust her with the other dog ever again? I would never introduce them until I work on the husky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
Sounds to me like both of your dogs need more time outside. An hour a day outside with a husky is torture to a breed that needs about three times that. If you were forced to stay in bed for 8 hours a day while nobody else was home you'd be eating the pillows too! This could explain a lot of what you're seeing right there.

One thing you could try if you REALLY can't prioritize getting the dog out is to buy a pair of skates and let her pull you around. This will burn off some of her energy and frustration faster. Another -- obvious -- option is to hire a walking service to take your dog out while you're at work and/or to take her to doggy daycare where she will get the opportunity to play with other dogs while you're not home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Hi Nick1,
Sorry to hear about your challenges. I think you have some options to keep both dogs with diligent management, a little more time and, possibly, some money.

It seems that you got your husky as a puppy and that the initial bone incident occurred when she was fairly young. Puppies are particularly sensitive to early experiences so the fact they had an encounter when she was a puppy and they've had two recent incidents, I think it is safe to say there will be more and perhaps with building intensity. Your husky is also coming of age and adolescents is a time of uncertainty and jockeying for position in the world. They are bound to bump heads, especially for two, generally, assertive breeds.

There are many more pieces to the puzzle with regard to whether you should keep both dogs or not. For that, I would seek a reputable trainer in your area who can observe and ask many questions. If your goal is to keep them both, here is what I would recommend:
  • No free access toys, bones, food or anything else they take possession of. Don't give them the opportunity for a bad encounter. Set them up for success. When you give them these items, separate them. First in different rooms and, as the husky matures and things start to settle down, you can slowly bring them closer with a gate or other barrier.
  • As was already said, both dogs need more exercise and mental stimulation. Challenging their minds through learning new behaviors will wear them out and give their brain something to process in the hours that follow (good to do in the morning before you leave for the day). Some of this is totally free (YouTube has endless training tips and ideas) and some costs money (trainers, classes, dog sports, toys, puzzles). In addition to the great suggestions made previously (Find It, dog sports, etc):
    • Training your husky on a dog scooter could be super fun for you both (roller skates hard to control with a dog). Here's a video
      . We went for a ride, loved it and so did the dogs.
    • You cold also hire a trainer for just a couple sessions to give your some ideas on games you could play with both dogs at the same time.
    • There are lots of food puzzle games that can occupy them for an hour or so.
  • I hate to say, but you need an alternative to 8 hours in the crate. I know it's hard when you work all day and coming home at lunch isn't an option. But there's just no chance she'll step out of that cage in a mental state that will foster harmony in the house. If there's no one who can help you for free or you can't afford a dog walker or daycare, I'm afraid your situation is not likely to improve. Rehoming her may be the best decision and result in better quality of lives for everyone. But, don't give up yet : )
  • You might consider the sleeping situation. I have nothing against dogs in bed but it can become another resource to take possession of. If both dogs sleep with you, the close proximity could result in problems. And if just the husky sleeps with you that could lead to more possession over you. Something to talk over with a trainer.
  • The nipping could turn into something less nippy. Ask a trainer.
Learning to read your dogs' body language is a super useful skill and will tell you a lot about their interactions and when you need to intervene. Culture Clash is an excellent book as well as Other End of the Leash. When watching your dogs' body language, generally stiff and focused indicates tension is brewing and loose and relaxed indicates all is well.​
I hope that helps, good luck and hang in there!​
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top