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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm a big dog lover and there are a lot of breeds that i really admire.
but exactly for the reasons I love them, I would never chose them to live with me.
Loving these breeds, for me, means to read about them meet owners that have them and and spend time with the dogs or walk them in shelters.
Loving them means, that I want to learn what they need and what characteristics are typical for the breed and, knowing myself and my own lifestyle, choose to not give them a home. even if I love them.

One of these breeds is the Akita Inu.
American Akitas (japanese Akitas usually don't end up in shelters...) are becoming more common and with this, end up in shelters more than a decade or two ago.
let's face it their beauty is what makes them attractive for a lot of people and sometimes the wrong ones choose this dog.
I love their aloofness, their "no nonsense" attitude, their clear, precise body language, and yes... i also think they're beautiful.
The first dog I, as person that was dog phobic for a big part of my childhood, really liked and trusted, was an old AkitaxPitbull mix in our local shelter. Coolest, relaxed and most stubborn dog I've seen in my whole life. he was just calm, liked being with the people he knew, and as long as you didn't ask him to do anything fancy or let him get too close to other dogs, he was the easiest to walk and work with.

But I still would not take in such a dog.
I live in the city and want to be able to take my dog into the citycenter, drive with me on a bus, spend time in cafés or the park, meet with friends and neighbours, have spontanious guests over...everywhere there are a lot of people, free-roaming cats, rabbits and other dogs...
Akitas are great dogs, but they aren't the ideal companion for this lifestyle and surroundings.
Sometimes loving a breed, means not setting them up for failure and deciding against getting such a dog instead of hoping that the dog hasn't read it's breed description.
 

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The list of dogs I find extremely interesting and would love to own is as long as my arm. However many of those are exotic breeds unknown to many because they are in some far corner working as opposed to being pets. I hope as a breed they continue to survive in our ever modernizing world, but I'd never own one myself.
 

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I could not have said it better.
I LOVE the look of the giant Schnauzer, Blood hound, merle colored Louisiana Catahoula and the Chinese Crested. But it would not be fair to the dog if I brought one home just because it looks amazing.
 

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I grew up with large dogs but I know that my lifestyle for the next ten to fifteen years will be small city flats and public transport. Although it isnt impossible to have some large breeds in that situation I dont want to make things harder for me than it already will be. I like being able to pick my dog up and if I move to the continent the convenience of a toy poodle vs standard poodle on the trains matters. These things matter to me because I get very easily anxious. Why make life harder looking for apartments and getting around when I can get just as much dog in a smaller package?

I LOVE the big working dogs, they are amazing. But I dont want to try to fit a bernese mountain dog in a apartment in an old European city. Although its temperament would probably fit me. I also dont like that when we talk about whether a breed is apartment friendly its discussed in regards to its energy needs. Just because a St Bernard doesnt need to run it doesnt mean it wont like a bit of space and putting your husky out in well fenced yard is not exercise.

I love the big dogs but I have a disability that affects my balance so for me a big dog needs to have a super trainable laid back temperament. Its not that I dont like aloof and independent dogs, I find them endearing but there is no way I am confident enough in my training abilities and physical strength that I could control them when that independence is in a large body.

Small, independent and prey driven like the Miniature Pinscher I can deal with but the Husky not so much. Yes it is down to training whether your husky pulls you down the street but there is always that awkward time when training hasnt yet been succesful and with my balance problems the dog would only have to be 6 months before it could pull me down.

There are some breeds that I would not own without owning a house with a fenced garden. The sighthounds would be one, prey driven breeds that would be hard to exercise without a secure garden. I would have to spend some time with the Afghan Hound, that is a breed that I might possibly break my "no big and prey driven breeds" rule for. But if it proves too powerful for me it will only have to be a fantasy breed.

The head needs to always rule over the heart in these matters. I have owned a dog before that was very inappropriate for our experience and lifestyle. He was my best friend but it is heartbreaking because you feel that incompatability and the exhaustion when you try to provide for him.

People also need to realise that you dont need to get a husky if you want an active dog, you dont need a border collie to do sports and tricks. Most lower intensity breeds will do the job just fine. People underestimate the little ones and new owners cannot be fully prepared for the shock that high intensity dogs are.
 
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Ahh, I've loved Corgis forever! Goofy, silly, lovable things, but I know they have a tendency to bark and we'd need a house for one, not suitable for a condo. I hear you on the Akita - for me it's a Shiba Inu. Don't think I could handle that stubborn of a dog though. ;)
 

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If looks were the only consideration I'd have a lot of blue-eyed silver siberian huskies. I just love the look, it's stunning to me. But ... I am so not prepared to handle a husky of any kind and our summers would be unpleasant to them.
 

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Border Collies, Australian Shepherds, Malinois. I love them, I love their drive, their looks, their attitudes. They are not the dogs for me however, I'd never be able to give them the exercise they needed, I'm not nearly enough into training to keep them mentally stimulated, and I do not have a job for any of those breeds to do. I'd end up with a neurotic dog that's inventing jobs for itself if I got one, so I'll admire them from afar.
 

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For me, probably an APBT. I think they are gorgeous, stunning dogs and I have met several that were total sweethearts. But while they can be good with other dogs and cats, it's too important to me to have a dog that can be around other animals and it's just too big of a risk.
 

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Malinois!! I love their drive, intensity, and their looks. But they might be too intense and high energy. ( I recognize that might sound funny given my BC and Aussie crew)

I also really like Papillions, but my dogs would terrorize a small dog.
 

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I want a Old English Sheepdog. I have always loved them but I am just more suited to a hound, plus all that fur would kill me.
 
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Dalmatians are one breed I love but would never get. I love the athleticism and their look but the personality and energy would keep us from being a match. Also love Samoyeds but I can't do the fur. There would be unintentional neglect.
There's other breeds I wish would work out of course but know they wouldn't. Some for crazy grooming requirements but most because they're high energy working breeds with strong personalities. I like them enough to keep them out of my life!
 
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