Dog Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are considering adopting a Golden Retriever or Golden Mix Puppy in the next few months. We have a 7 yr old spayed female dog, Licorice, currently, who we have had since she was 8 weeks. We think she is mostly a German Shepard/ Corgi mix. Licorice is generally good with other dogs, but she also definitely wants to be the alpha in pack-like situations. If we decide on a puppy, we would do a trial run to be sure they got along, but I am assuming that a puppy is more likely to be submissive, since they are so young (?) as well as the fact that Goldens in general we have heard have a friendly temperament. I have done research, but can't find a definite answer that a male puppy + female dog or female puppy + female dog would produce a happier pairing.( Either way, the puppy would be fixed at a young age.) If anyone has any advice on male vs. female puppy, or the idea of adopting a new puppy in general, it would be very much appreciated! Happy to provide more info if needed as well. Thanks for any help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,827 Posts
I adopted a female Australian mix, when she was 5 years old, her name is Jaya. When she was about 6 years old, I adopted a 2 year old male Golden Retriever that I named HaHa.

Jaya's about 8 now, and for the past few years, she's basically been HaHa's mommy. She cleans his ears, and licks his back when they lay down next to each other.

But sometimes when she's afraid at night (my cat scares Jaya), she will come and get HaHa - wakes him up from where he's sleeping on the sofa and he will get up and go into the room where she likes to sleep, with her following and looking a lot less stress. He stays in there for 15 minutes to a half hour then comes back out and goes back to sleep on the sofa. I sleep on the recliner, and I know that this happens once to three or four times during the night if the cat decides to play zoomies through the house.

I've almost always owned dogs in pairs, but, I've never had a male/male pair.
I have found that with the female/female pairing the dogs tend not to be as playful with each other but all my various female/female pairs have been comfortable with each other.

The male/female pairs.... I think they tended to play and interact a bit more with each other, and usually, for some reason, the female has always taken the more dominate roll when it came to little things a like which one got to come in or go out the doggy door first.

When I first got HaHa, he was a bit too exuberant around Jaya and she snapped a few times at him...I figured she could teach him doggy manners better than I could, so I didn't interfere or say anything...and withing 2 or 3 incidents, HaHa learned to approach her without crowding into her or getting into her face. Once that was settled, he and Jaya have had zero incidents of lip lifting or snarling and they will play with each other upon occasion. Jaya's still learning how to play, so if it wasn't for that, they might be playing more than they do.

Stormy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,885 Posts
Generally the success of pairs goes this order:
Male/female
Male/male
Female/female

That's not to say that you shouldn't go for a female if she really hits it off with your current dog. Overall, I think compatibility depends on how "sexist" the dogs are. Some dogs really have a bone to pick with dogs of their gender, others don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,208 Posts
If you have a status seeking female, I would definitely get a male puppy. Age doesn't necessarily mean they will be submissive. Years ago our 12 week old Doxie walked into the house ready to take over the whole pack from our 9 year old Beagle mix matriarch. She was not pleased and it took him 2 weeks to acknowledge she was the boss. Those first two weeks she hid in my parents' room so she didn't have to deal with him. But in my experience the best pairing with a female dog is a younger male.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,437 Posts
I've had every gender combination imaginable and no real problems with any combo. I think individual personalities, socialization history, positive and negative life experiences with other dogs, age of second dog when acquired, age of resident dog when second dog added, genetics and countless other factors play a part in how well any two dogs will get along.

If I were you I'd get a male puppy. :)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top