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I'm currently feeding my pitbull puppy, "Nutro Puppy Chiot". There's another forum I visit that's completely unrelated to dogs/pets but there was a topic about feeding dogs a raw food diet and it was spoken really highly of. I like the idea of feeding a more natural diet but I asked my vet about it and he recommended I keep feeding him what I am now. He said there were risks of salmonella with a raw food diet. I don't know much about salmonella but what from what I read so far, most dogs can recover from salmonella without treatment, and can be given antibiotics for more severe cases so it doesn't sound like that big of a deal unless I'm missing something. So would you guys recommend I switch my pup to raw food? If so, where should I start for this or how should I make the transition? I want to feed my pup the best diet possible.
 

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I'm currently feeding my pitbull puppy, "Nutro Puppy Chiot". There's another forum I visit that's completely unrelated to dogs/pets but there was a topic about feeding dogs a raw food diet and it was spoken really highly of. I like the idea of feeding a more natural diet but I asked my vet about it and he recommended I keep feeding him what I am now. He said there were risks of salmonella with a raw food diet. I don't know much about salmonella but what from what I read so far, most dogs can recover from salmonella without treatment, and can be given antibiotics for more severe cases so it doesn't sound like that big of a deal unless I'm missing something. So would you guys recommend I switch my pup to raw food? If so, where should I start for this or how should I make the transition? I want to feed my pup the best diet possible.
I have fed all of mine prey model raw from day one home, never a bite of kibble. Dogs bodies are designed to handle salmonella and all other bacteria in meat. Raw is species appropriate, and being that way, their digestive tract is short and it digests and moves meat, bone and organs through fast enough that no bacteria would even have time to settle in. It's just digest, move through and bam. Done.

Unless you have a holistic vet, they are going to be against raw. For one thing, vets get very little training in k9 nutrition. What they little they get comes from big companies like Purina and Hills. Those are also what they usually sell in their offices too, and it's how they make a huge percentage of money. Feeding that kibble insures the client is coming back with issues. Teeth, skin, digestive problems etc.....

Just FYI, here is a site with a getting started guide, and all raw forums to read over as well.Prey Model Raw - PMR dog food
 

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Unless you have a holistic vet, they are going to be against raw. For one thing, vets get very little training in k9 nutrition. What they little they get comes from big companies like Purina and Hills. Those are also what they usually sell in their offices too, and it's how they make a huge percentage of money. Feeding that kibble insures the client is coming back with issues. Teeth, skin, digestive problems etc.....
Was there a sale on tinfoil? I'd love to see any evidence you have that vets push dog food so the can exploit the problems it causes.
 

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Was there a sale on tinfoil? I'd love to see any evidence you have that vets push dog food so the can exploit the problems it causes.
They sell food in their offices, prescription and otherwise. It's a huge part of their income. Kibble keeps dogs coming in for dental problems and cleanings, they come in with allergies and other problems so the vets put them on special prescription foods, which in turn keeps them coming back for more. When it doesn't work, it gets changed to something else or the latest newest "cure all" food to try. And the cycle continues.....Vets have very little education in k9 nutrition. They let food reps tell them all about it.

I've worked as a vet tech for both small animal and equine both for the last twenty or so years.....

BTW, check walmart for tinfoil sales...
 

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They sell food in their offices, prescription and otherwise. It's a huge part of their income. Kibble keeps dogs coming in for dental problems and cleanings, they come in with allergies and other problems so the vets put them on special prescription foods, which in turn keeps them coming back for more. When it doesn't work, it gets changed to something else or the latest newest "cure all" food to try. And the cycle continues.....

I've worked as a vet tech for both small animal and equine both for the last twenty or so years.....

BTW, check walmart for tinfoil sales...
But what about building 7 ?!?!?!?!
 

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I'm not keen on raw because of the way meat is processed in the US, if I were a hunter it might be different. There are too many points of handling and there is a lot of time between slaughter and being sold in most cases. The potential for build up of bacteria load really concerns me. That said, the sheer quantity of kibble recalls for bacteria load also worries me. We compromise with the honest kitchen for echo, it's reasonably priced for a medium dog ~$70 per month, made from human grade ingredients and Echo has thrived on it, more weight gained and her poops are better.
 

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I have personally only had good experiences with feeding raw. Bandit will be fed raw for the rest of his life and any dog I have afterwards will be fed raw. I was lucky enough to find a "live and let live" style vet who personally wouldn't recommend raw, but saw the benefits and improvements that Bandit was receiving from the diet and agreed that it was working very well for him and didn't try to dissuade me from it.

I find the biggest risk of raw is to myself, because I have a weakened immune system. But with a little common sense I've kept my risk to a minimum.

I would never judge someone for feeding kibble, but if you are leaning towards raw I would highly recommend it, it has done wonders for Bandit.
 

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I'm not keen on raw because of the way meat is processed in the US, if I were a hunter it might be different. There are too many points of handling and there is a lot of time between slaughter and being sold in most cases. The potential for build up of bacteria load really concerns me. That said, the sheer quantity of kibble recalls for bacteria load also worries me. We compromise with the honest kitchen for echo, it's reasonably priced for a medium dog ~$70 per month, made from human grade ingredients and Echo has thrived on it, more weight gained and her poops are better.
Dogs are designed to handle the bacteria. Dogs will eat stuff that has been dead for months. Mine have come up with deer scraps several months old that they have buried. It just doesn't affect them.

The meat processed in the US has human grade guidelines, and its still leaps and bounds above kibble. You just have to watch sodium level in some.
 

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We compromise with the honest kitchen for echo, it's reasonably priced for a medium dog ~$70 per month, made from human grade ingredients and Echo has thrived on it, more weight gained and her poops are better.
I find this interesting - where do you think the honest kitchen gets their meats? And where do you think raw feeders get the majority of ours?


OP, the ones that raw feed tend to be the believers. Look at the ingredients on the food you are currently serving your dog the look at the ingredients on whole chicken, beef, pork etc. Dogs really thrive on being fed raw and the visible benefits are wonderful.
 

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@jagger It's cooked and dehydrated both processing minimizes bacteria load.
@naturalfeddogs I think we are just going to have to disagree on bacteria and dog's ability to digest them without issue. Human grade meat guidelines do not assume raw eating. I didn't suggest kibble.
 

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@jagger It's cooked and dehydrated both processing minimizes bacteria load.
Honest kitchen recalled a few years ago due to possible salmonella in parsley of all things. Parsley...

I don't get the scare tactics at all Chas, believe what you want to believe. On prey model raw for example, there's far less ingredients to worry about. If our pup isn't hungry, he'll hide his food til he is. He's dug raw chicken legs out of his kennel that have been in there for a day, he'll run to the deck with it and chow down.

I don't cook any of my meats to any specific temp - I like my chicken and pork a little underdone, beef is near rare on my plate. Never been sick from whole meats, but I have gotten ill from store bought jerky.
 

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Look at the ingredients on the food you are currently serving your dog the look at the ingredients on whole chicken, beef, pork etc. Dogs really thrive on being fed raw and the visible benefits are wonderful.
All of those ingredients are there for a reason. Dogs thrive on dog food. Dogs aren't wild animals and the average life expectancy for a stray which scavenges rotting meat is a fraction of a pet.
 

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All of those ingredients are there for a reason. Dogs thrive on dog food. Dogs aren't wild animals and the average life expectancy for a stray which scavenges rotting meat is a fraction of a pet.
I have a feeling the average life expectancy for a stray doesn't have as much to do with what it's eating as to other environmental factors, including a lack of food. My dog happens to thrive on a raw diet, and not on any kibble I've ever had him on. I would also never feed my dog rotting meat and that isn't a part of Prey model raw so there's that as well.
 
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@naturalfeddogs for example; dogs can be infected by salmonella , given a large enough bacterial load this can become a symptomatic infection. I would agree that the bacterial load needed to cause clinical signs in dogs is much greater than for human clinical infection but it is possible. Similarly for other types of bacteria.
@jagger what scare tactics? I simply stated my reasons for avoiding raw and kibble and what worked for Echo.
@DamnDonald this is a good systematic review of the scientific evidence on raw versus processed foods so far Review of raw and processed food . So far there isn't even enough hard evidence for a definite conclusion.
 

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Lack of food, disease, etc.

Just like the average life expectancy of humans is up over 100% in a few centuries. Why is salt fortified with iodine, cereal with iron or water with fluoride, why is milk pasteurized.

Could we live without these things (and the many of others I'm not listing)? Sure...we did for most of our existence, but that's doesn't mean we're not healthier because of them.
 

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No, to me the risks outweigh the benefits. Since the OP asked whether forum users would recommend raw I gave my reasons for avoiding it.
 
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