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HELLO :)

My puppy will be turning 6 months on July 15th and getting him neutered has crossed my mind so many times. I am extremely nervous of this procedure and debating on whether I should do it or not. My ONLY concern is that he will die being put on anesthesia.

Does a dog really benefit from getting neutered? Did you get your dog neutered? Why? Should I get my puppy neutered?
 

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HELLO


My puppy will be turning 6 months on July 15th and getting him neutered has crossed my mind so many times. I am extremely nervous of this procedure and debating on whether I should do it or not. My ONLY concern is that he will die being put on anesthesia.

Does a dog really benefit from getting neutered? Did you get your dog neutered? Why? Should I get my puppy neutered?
Hey there! Congrats on the new family member. So I'm very much pro- neutering/spaying because 1.- It helps control the dog population, 2.- It promotes adopting dogs and 3.- because from my experience, when you have a dog but don't plan on breeding them, they get super uncomfortable because they don't have a “release" if you will. Not to mention, the reduced humping is a nice bonus. There's a lot of debate about its overall affects on our doggies health, I've read before that it reduces the chances of some cancers which I would like to believe but, as someone with no medical experience, I can't confirm nor deny such rumor. As someone who has a female, I didn't want to see her be uncomfortable all the time when she was in heat. The way I see it, you only shouldn't get your dogs neutered/spayed if you plan on (responsibly) breeding them. And when they are young, the surgery isn't as risky as when they are older not to mention the surgery for males is also less risky because it's all on the exterior (on YouTube there's a video by a channel named Vet Ranch that shows the procedure of neutering a dog if you are interested). But dont worry, the pup is still young and you still have time to debate it, and/or find a good vet that makes you feel secure. After all, a few extra bucks is nothing in exchange for the security of our furry friends!
 

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The current thinking, with a male dog, is to wait until he is mature to neuter him. The advantage of waiting is that it lowers the risk of certain bone cancers, and the dog physically develops better when they have the benefit of their hormones. In a male dog the advantage of neutering them is that it eliminates the risk of testicular cancer. The other advantage is that you do not have a male dog that wants to escape because there's a female in the area who's in heat. If you are not concerned about testicular cancer, and you are 100% certain that you can keep an intact male dog from escaping and getting some female dog pregnant, then leaving him intact is no big deal.

Some people that want the advantages of the dog having it's hormones but do not want to have to worry about the dog getting female dogs pregnant opt to get the dog a vasectomy, rather then a traditional neuter. You could ask about that if you like.

Just for anyone who's wondering, with female dogs it's advised to spay them before the first heat because it virtually eliminates the possibility of the dog developing mammary cancer. The more heats the dog has the grater the risk of mammary cancer till there's no benefit from spaying the dog to prevent it. With females there is also the risk of pyometra (uterine cancer), so spaying a female provides more health benefits then neutering a male.
 

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If you plan to ever put your dog in doggy daycare or if it ever develops separation anxiety and needs to be in doggy daycare, many if not most require dogs to be spayed and neutered.
Also many unneutered dogs can be harassed and attacked more by neutered dogs in public places like dog parks or visiting friends or family with neutered dogs. There tends to be less conflict in general with less hormones involved. Just more thoughts to consider.
 

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I am not in favor of unilaterally spaying and neutering pets but, if you are never going to breed the dog and, you aren't confident that you can manage an intact dog in all situations, then, by all means, have them spayed or neutered once they are mature. (age 1 to 1.5 years)

None of my are altered but, that also means that at certain times of the year, I have to keep my three males separate form one another for weeks on end and, I have to keep my female away form all of them during that time. Mine are wolfdogs so, one heat per year for females and, something of a rut at that time of year for the males.

Hormones peak and so does dog to dog aggression among the males, even with no female around. Female is a fussy, restless dog while in heat if she isn't bred. For me that isn't a big deal and, yes I know there are some risks to not altering them, but there are risks to altering them as well. My values lean to the as nature intended side and so, I accept the risks that come with letting them remain intact.
 

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I think it very much depends on the dog and the owner. If the dog does not show any obvious issues such as heightened aggression or heightened sexuality (humping, marking, etc) then I can understand not wanting to neuter. Also the owner has to be aware that they will need to be more responsible. Male dogs are wired to find a female in heat if they smell her and will do anything possible. Having a unnuetered dog does make playing in parks and being in public more difficult as well as it is the owner's responsibility to make sure that their dog isn't running loose.

In most developed countries with good veterinary care the risks from going under anesthesia are minimal. It's always a good idea to speak with your vet about your concerns.
 

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I spay/neuter my dogs. With males, it helps eliminate marking behavior in particular.

If you are nervous, you could stay at the vet's and wait until you can take your dog home. Ask to be able to see your dog as soon as it comes out of anesthesia. Ask your vet ahead of time (some vets don't allow you to wait there; some do). I think being there makes the staff a bit more careful. Bring a book - you'll be there for a while. I do this for any procedure requiring anesthesia.
 

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The only unarguable benifical reason to neuter is to prevent unwanted or accidental breedings. Everything else has pluses and minuses on either side of the argument and becomes a wash.
 

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The only unarguable benifical reason to neuter is to prevent unwanted or accidental breedings. Everything else has pluses and minuses on either side of the argument and becomes a wash.
Yep, that's why I push spaying because there are at least 2 solid health benefits that I know of besides no longer being able to have 1 to 24 puppies once or twice a year, but not neutering. Neutering is a wash and if the owner can keep the dog from escaping and mating then leaving them intact is really none of my business. Personally I neuter my males, but it's a personal preference.
 
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