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I have been looking for a good breed of dog to be my new hunting dog and all around outdoor buddy. Recently my friend has gotten a english setter puppy so I will be watching that puppy for some first hand experience. But my friend also told me that his brother in law has a English setter that is going to have puppies here very soon and he could get me a good price on a puppy. The parents are very renown hunting dogs in the local breeding market and I thought this would be a great opportunity, I just want to get some information first before I commit because I know getting a dog is a big commitment.
Here is a bit more about my situation.
I have a dog, a mini bernedoodle, who is my wife's dog, and she is very friendly and will love another dog in the house. I am fairly active, trying to get out and do outdoor stuff weekly as my schedule allows, but have a fenced in back yard where my dog plays. I want to have a bird dog for upland game use (Pheasants, grouse, not water fowl in particular but i am curious to know how one would do with that) but even though it is a hunting dog, it can still be a good family dog as me and my wife will be having kids in the next few years. I also was wondering how easy they are to train, I'm sure the hunting part comes easy, but I want to know how obedient they tend to be. I know that mostly has to do with how they are trained, but just wanted to see if they have any natural tendencies. Since it will be indoors most of the time, I was wondering how bad the shed is. We have the time and skills to do the required grooming, but I want to know what to expect.

Any other information about your experience with the breed and things to expect would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Wikipedia answers all these questions...mostly. It doesn't talk about the training required to perform the "huting" function the way YOU want it to be! And they don't talk at all about this breed's water capabilities.

I haven't worked with and ES as far as I remember, but I did work with a very experienced hunting dog trainer for a few years, and can tell you that the vast majority of his clients were annual board and train for tune up.

Hunting dogs come with the genetic propensity to hunt. But they need to be taught human rules about that. It takes a lot of effort and time, and I'd guess for a new dog owner, lots and lots of trainer assistance to get you to a place where you can actually hunt with your pup...not to mention time, as in potentially a year or 2.

But, as long as you realize these things, English Setters sound like wonderful dogs that naturally take to upland d birding and family life. So...
 

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From what I know, which isn't much, they are pretty easy to train. However, because of the prey drive, you'll need to be extra diligent about reliable recalls and "leave it" in non-hunting environments (like a family outing to a park).

Most setters I've met in general are pretty exuberant. So, just something to keep in mind about a young dog x young child, guests=make sure to work on those door and greeting manners. I'd also see if your friend can introduce you to the parents of your possible pup, get a feel for the temperament, have a chat or few with their person(s).
 
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