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Hi, I posted earlier about an adorable 8 month old pittie that I was approved to adopt. I'm still waiting (moving), but I don't think that I would be the best owner for him. I know there's significantly more responsibility owning a pit bull type, but I am getting some strong second thoughts.

-home and pet insurance is higher or harder to get
-breed specific liability insurance can be expensive
-the strong stigmas might not be something I want to live with everyday
-I have a large yard but no fence
-I might have to rent someday, even though I am buying a house now
-catastrophic consequences for any mishaps (I know prey drive and aggression can be minimized, but it would hurt me a little too much if he decided to catch someone's cat or toy pet)
-I probably wouldn't be able to keep up with him if he becomes high energy (pretty low energy pup right now heh)
-What if I stay in the military and have to move to a restricted country in 3 years? On top of that I can end up working full time
-First dog I would actually be taking care of by myself (I have grown up around large and small breeds though)

I think I have to tell my rescue assistant that I am feeling this, but it would break my heart since this pup has only until recently known only suffering all his life, and his trainer has very high hopes for him. Don't get me wrong, I don't doubt for a second that owning one of these majestic dogs is very rewarding. I just don't think it's something for me :( What do you fine folks think? I already feel sick enough thinking this, I just want what is best for everyone. Especially from the safety side of things.
 

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I've wanted a pitbull type dog for YEARS! They're simply adorable, cuddly, loving, high energy/active (I wouldn't say I'm super active but I love being outdoors - hiking, camping etc) but I was also intimidated with the idea of having a possibly dog aggressive dog.

Here in Vancouver, BC we don't have any bans on pitbulls but some cities will charge more for your dog license if you own a pitbull type dog. I rent, and luckily my building doesn't have any breed specific rules. However I did look up which cities/counties do have a ban so that if I wanted to move, I had to make sure it wasn't to a place that didn't allow for pitbulls (like Manitoba, Ontario etc) and certain states.

I also didn't know if I was going to be able to handle a stubborn, (physically) strong dog like a pitbull type. My shiba (of 12 years) is very stubborn so at least I've had some experience in that department.

Not only that, once you become a pitbull type owner, you become a Pitbull Advocate (or at least being a responsible owner you should). You have to be ready to defend them and educate people, especially the ones that have been heavily influenced by the media.

Be prepared for people to avoid you, give you fearful looks or reactions when they see you walking by. Mia is only 4 months old and I've already gotten scared/ "oh." reactions when they ask me what kind of dog she is. (She's a mix of American Pitbull Terrier and American Staffordshire terrier I think.) But I've also had lots of people give warm reactions to her, some are pitbull owners while others are pitbull lovers.

I've realized that I will not be able to take Mia to dog parks which I'm actually okay with. I don't generally like dog parks because not all dogs are well behaved and who knows what kind of things your dogs can pick up from there. I prefer scheduled playdates. I won't be able to have her off leash unless we are in an open/remote area with no one else around. I will not risk letting her play with dogs I don't know because if anything happens, even if the other dog initiated a fight or bit her first, if she hurts that dog...its Mia that's going to get blamed.

I'm going to do everything I can to socialize her now (puppy classes, obedience classes, playdates, taking her when I can to run errands) but I read (in a Pitbull forum) that once they reach maturity at around 2-4 years of age, that's when dog aggression can happen, no matter how much socializing you do when they're younger. I don't know how accurate this is, every dog is different, but it's something I am preparing myself for.

Before I decided to get Mia, I read so many different blogs/articles/pitbull forums on pros and cons of owning a pitbull type dog. It was a huge decision to make (as you are obviously aware) and at times I do find myself second guessing....but when she rests her head on my chest and looks up at me, giving me that doe-eyed look and licks my nose, to me its totally worth it.

Do you have any friends that own pitbull types? (I have a few and I find that it helps because they can share their experiences with me. Their dogs are all really well behaved). Definitely talk to your rescue assistant, she can probably give you more insight on owning a pitbull type dog as well.

Good luck :) Just the fact that you are re-thinking this makes you a responsible owner because you are being realistic about it, and realizing the responsibility of owning a bully breed. A lot of people just jump into it thinking they can handle owning these types of dogs and then they end up in shelters or on the streets.
 

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Thank you for taking the time to reply . It does make me happy to hear about your little pack :) The goofy smile always sells me

Where I am at (Virginia) Pit bulls are actually quite popular, just the same though there's lots of backyard breeders and "oops" litters. No BSL as far as I have heard.

Yeesh I hear Shibas are a little notorious for stubbornness. My cousin's German Shepherd mix is also a wild child. "Just gonna nibble on your wrists and go for a car ride with you guys, k thanks"

I hear you on the ambassador part, little Jacob is already a budding star because of his ordeal. Shelter even made it a point I would have to talk to his facebook fans and give them updates.

I wholeheartedly agree with you about dog parks, not just for pibbles though. Besides the massive amounts of activity and distractions, all it takes is one naïve owner to cause an incident. All owners don't want to be attacked, but somehow some think they should be immune when their unleashed/untrained dog instigates.

That 2-4 year mark is when they say a pit bull's personality is set since they mature a little slower. Also if there are any aggression/prey drive issues that it is around this time it should show itself I think.

All the research ends up messing with my head ugh. The pro people can be too naïve and well meaning, and the con people are closed minded and spiteful.

If I have friends that do own them they aren't talking and I can't blame them. Did talk to a girl once who would show me the silliest videos of hers' ^^ Pretty much rebelled and refused to come in from those midnight potty breaks. Another girl I used to talk to has one that sleeps all the time apparently.

Thank you :) I would honestly be just as happy with any dog. I have seen my share of people who just jump into it. Like a border collie that was never stimulated, walked, or trained. As much as I love love love pitbulls, I think I might have to tell the shelter otherwise.
 

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I love pitties. I have a few friends with bully mixes (mostly pit x staffy) and all of them are lovely lovely dogs. The dog park we frequent has a few that come by and each of them has been nothing but friendly and social both with other dogs and people. Some of them play too rough for my girl, so she greets them but opts not to engage in play - both dogs go off to find more suitable playmates.

BUT, I will never own one. Purely for the reasons that you list above. As an owner, you become, if not an advocate (as no breed should be advocated for in all situations), but a resource for information and experiences. This is true for most breeds but is much more intensified for bully-breed owners. Moving around is a lot harder, finding dog sitters/day care is a lot harder, etc.

I just don't have the time/energy to devote to that additional work in caring for a dog. There are so many other dogs that need rescuing that aren't bully breeds, so I will always go for one of those that suits my lifestyle.

Dog placement will always work out best if the dog and the human are suited for each other (not just in personality, but in life adaptability). It sounds like your life may have enough unknowns in the future that a pitty isn't the right option *right now*. There will always be sweet pitties looking for homes -- down the line when you're more settled, it might be a better time to give one a home.
 

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I think I have to tell my rescue assistant that I am feeling this, but it would break my heart since this pup has only until recently known only suffering all his life, and his trainer has very high hopes for him. Don't get me wrong, I don't doubt for a second that owning one of these majestic dogs is very rewarding. I just don't think it's something for me :( What do you fine folks think? I already feel sick enough thinking this, I just want what is best for everyone.
Hi Firefox,

I really applaud you for really considering whether this dog is the right one for you before you proceed with the adoption process. Based on your posts, I think the answer is clear: this is not the right dog for you at this point in time.

It's ok, and ultimately much better for you, the rescue group, and the dog, to stop moving forward now. The dog appears to be in very good hands, and by stepping aside, the rescue group can start looking for a more suitable family. Taking the dog home, realizing that you and he are not a good fit for each other, and then returning the dog would ultimately be much more stressful for everyone, including the pup.

Adopting a dog because you feel sorry for it or because you want to please the rescue group can lead you to making a poor choice. I've been there and done that. (Just click on my username and then statistics to read all about my first failed adoption.)

Bringing home a dog should be a lifelong commitment and I would advise you to wait until you find that perfect dog for you. There are many, many dogs in need of good homes, and in time, you'll find the right one for you. It will happen. Good luck!
 

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If there's any second thoughts at all, then don't do it. You have the right reasons for not doing it.


From what I'm seeing, some of the stigma is very slowly going away around here and much of that is due to the pitties actually running the dog parks and being out in public in general. Here in Alberta I don't believe there's any real breed restrictions left, and Edmonton lifted the pitbull restrictions a few years ago. I guess city council finally removed the bone from it's collective brains and did it right.

i'll run across 4 or 5 pitties in the course of a run through the average park, pretty common dog around here now. All are very friendly. I can't resist a pit, as long as the owner is cool with it, then pet away. I talk to alot of people along the way, doesn't seem to be any issues with fighting and aggression. Owners of said pitties tell me that many people that were afraid of the breed actually lightened up some after the meets and greets with the dogs in the parks. They carry the attitude of changing just one mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I love pitties. I have a few friends with bully mixes (mostly pit x staffy) and all of them are lovely lovely dogs. The dog park we frequent has a few that come by and each of them has been nothing but friendly and social both with other dogs and people. Some of them play too rough for my girl, so she greets them but opts not to engage in play - both dogs go off to find more suitable playmates.

BUT, I will never own one. Purely for the reasons that you list above. As an owner, you become, if not an advocate (as no breed should be advocated for in all situations), but a resource for information and experiences. This is true for most breeds but is much more intensified for bully-breed owners. Moving around is a lot harder, finding dog sitters/day care is a lot harder, etc.

I just don't have the time/energy to devote to that additional work in caring for a dog. There are so many other dogs that need rescuing that aren't bully breeds, so I will always go for one of those that suits my lifestyle.

Dog placement will always work out best if the dog and the human are suited for each other (not just in personality, but in life adaptability). It sounds like your life may have enough unknowns in the future that a pitty isn't the right option *right now*. There will always be sweet pitties looking for homes -- down the line when you're more settled, it might be a better time to give one a home.
Yours is the kind of thinking that I think I'm starting to have. Amazing dogs, just probably not ideal for now.
 

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I think I have to tell my rescue assistant that I am feeling this, but it would break my heart since this pup has only until recently known only suffering all his life, and his trainer has very high hopes for him. Don't get me wrong, I don't doubt for a second that owning one of these majestic dogs is very rewarding. I just don't think it's something for me
What do you fine folks think? I already feel sick enough thinking this, I just want what is best for everyone.
Hi Firefox,

I really applaud you for really considering whether this dog is the right one for you before you proceed with the adoption process. Based on your posts, I think the answer is clear: this is not the right dog for you at this point in time.

It's ok, and ultimately much better for you, the rescue group, and the dog, to stop moving forward now. The dog appears to be in very good hands, and by stepping aside, the rescue group can start looking for a more suitable family. Taking the dog home, realizing that you and he are not a good fit for each other, and then returning the dog would ultimately be much more stressful for everyone, including the pup.

Adopting a dog because you feel sorry for it or because you want to please the rescue group can lead you to making a poor choice. I've been there and done that. (Just click on my username and then statistics to read all about my first failed adoption.)

Bringing home a dog should be a lifelong commitment and I would advise you to wait until you find that perfect dog for you. There are many, many dogs in need of good homes, and in time, you'll find the right one for you. It will happen. Good luck!
Your absolutely right. I texted them just now. As a cute puppy he should be easier to place. I would only be a part of the problem if I give him back as a 3 year old because I need to go to move to _______. At least there he can be with the pack, get lots of socialization he needs, and is a favorite at the shelter.
 

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If there's any second thoughts at all, then don't do it. You have the right reasons for not doing it.


From what I'm seeing, some of the stigma is very slowly going away around here and much of that is due to the pitties actually running the dog parks and being out in public in general. Here in Alberta I don't believe there's any real breed restrictions left, and Edmonton lifted the pitbull restrictions a few years ago. I guess city council finally removed the bone from it's collective brains and did it right.

i'll run across 4 or 5 pitties in the course of a run through the average park, pretty common dog around here now. All are very friendly. I can't resist a pit, as long as the owner is cool with it, then pet away. I talk to alot of people along the way, doesn't seem to be any issues with fighting and aggression. Owners of said pitties tell me that many people that were afraid of the breed actually lightened up some after the meets and greets with the dogs in the parks. They carry the attitude of changing just one mind.
Don't worry, I have a special place in my heart for pitties. My hometown of NC has actually a law that I'm not 100% for, but is still better than others. Basically enforces background checks and required training with the owners local ASPCA for anyone trying to own certain restriced breeds, not just a bully. Hear Ontario is still being stubborn though :(
 

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Hear Ontario is still being stubborn though :(
Stubborn is putting it lightly, draconian is a better word. They still carry the walks like a duck mentality, if it looks like a pit, then it has to be. How many dogs have been taken from their families for no good reason and either been simply put down, or sent out for research purposes just because of the breed. It's heartbreaking.
 

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Everything went alright. Really felt guilty though. Actually was invited to come to their main office to look at their only non-pittie there (others were at their training center). The place was a mad house but heaven for pit bull fans. Lo and behold they showed me what must have been the calmest Australian cattle dog mix who liked me very much ^^. Wasn't hyper at all even with the pit bull choir singing the song of their people. Already submitted the application. Thanks everyone for being so supportive.
 

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Wow! Congrats!

Tell us more about the new dog. How old is it? What do you know about its background?
The handler I was talking to think he might be about 1 or 2 years. Healthy looking to us thankfully. Has a very nice salt and pepper tan coat, plenty to shed too yikes. Pretty solid medium size. A little timid at first, but a few minutes later he couldn't wait to go outside with me and be friends. One of his ears droops a little lower than thr other, probably because he got mauled once... He was also shot in the leg, but you would NEVER notice unless you were told. Just needs some basic obedience, a warm bath and some treats^°^
 

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...

-I have a large yard but no fence
-I might have to rent someday, even though I am buying a house now
-catastrophic consequences for any mishaps (I know prey drive and aggression can be minimized, but it would hurt me a little too much if he decided to catch someone's cat or toy pet)
-I probably wouldn't be able to keep up with him if he becomes high energy (pretty low energy pup right now heh)
-What if I stay in the military and have to move to a restricted country in 3 years? On top of that I can end up working full time
-First dog I would actually be taking care of by myself (I have grown up around large and small breeds though)
I actually had a pretty long response written out yesterday, but deleted it because too many people posted in between (and it sounded as if you would reconsider the whole getting a dog idea). I should have posted it anyways.

Please consider: The points you mentioned in you initial post (I took the overly breed specific out of the quote) can be applicable to all dogs!
- All dogs would enjoy play time in a fenced in area and some breeds might need it even more than pitbulls.
- Not all rentals accept dogs at all, sure it is harder with a bully breed, but a dog in general can be a hurdle to overcome when searching for an apartment.
- Even a Chihuahua can bite and draw blood, can kill a hamster or other small pet, just because it's not the "pitbull" dog, doesn't mean that there can't be consequences. A cattle dog is a medium sized dog and thus can do harm as well.
- Australian cattle dogs are working dogs! They need a job to do, they are high energy. So if you are weary if you can supply the pitbull with the exercise it needs, do you think you are better off with a herder?
- I'm not sure about soldiers being able taking their dogs with them, but is that really the norm? being able to move with their dog to a foreign country if it is not a trained "working" dog?
- This breed might also not be suitable for a first time owner since they are supposedly not the easiest dog breed.

I know, it always depends on the individual dog, we got an AmStaff mix as first time owners and were lucky that she really is mellow (needs her exercise, but is not destructive, listens very well and easy to train).
Please just consider that your named concerns not only apply for the earlier mentioned pitbull, but also for this dog!
 

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I actually had a pretty long response written out yesterday, but deleted it because too many people posted in between (and it sounded as if you would reconsider the whole getting a dog idea). I should have posted it anyways.

Please consider: The points you mentioned in you initial post (I took the overly breed specific out of the quote) can be applicable to all dogs!
- All dogs would enjoy play time in a fenced in area and some breeds might need it even more than pitbulls.
- Not all rentals accept dogs at all, sure it is harder with a bully breed, but a dog in general can be a hurdle to overcome when searching for an apartment.
- Even a Chihuahua can bite and draw blood, can kill a hamster or other small pet, just because it's not the "pitbull" dog, doesn't mean that there can't be consequences. A cattle dog is a medium sized dog and thus can do harm as well.
- Australian cattle dogs are working dogs! They need a job to do, they are high energy. So if you are weary if you can supply the pitbull with the exercise it needs, do you think you are better off with a herder?
- I'm not sure about soldiers being able taking their dogs with them, but is that really the norm? being able to move with their dog to a foreign country if it is not a trained "working" dog?
- This breed might also not be suitable for a first time owner since they are supposedly not the easiest dog breed.

I know, it always depends on the individual dog, we got an AmStaff mix as first time owners and were lucky that she really is mellow (needs her exercise, but is not destructive, listens very well and easy to train).
Please just consider that your named concerns not only apply for the earlier mentioned pitbull, but also for this dog!
Thanks for replying :)
-I know all dogs benefit from a fence or secluded land. I can buy and install a tie out stake, but would always be scared if my sweet pittie were to pull it out and run off. Or finding out he's one who can jump a 6ft fence (or tunnel underneath). Of course I would never trust any dog alone on a tie out or inside a fence.
-I don't have to rent now, thankfully, but if I ever did owning him would make it nearly impossible and a little expensive. I tried it seriously for giggles and I can't imagine how any of you guys can do it! Lots of underhanded or passive aggressive declarations in rental offers. Always either a 35lb limit or "breed restrictions apply" for a little place in the heart of a crime dense city
-Nature of the beast right? I would have to be crazy not to accept certain risks. I know every dog is different, but terriers love a good chase. Learned that with a rat terrier. Every squirrel and bird she would chase but rarely got cause she was very chubby.
-Well if I were to move, there are lots of factors. There's at least 12 countries that flat out bans them, wouldn't even be able to say how many have strict BSLs. If I do deployments (highly doubt it though), it would be troublesome begging every person I know to look after him if the kennel turns him away. Then there are bases who have restrictions that may or may not allow him. On top of that, sometimes military family communities are very sensitive and love calling the military police over the littlest things, pretty much like condos or HOAs. Kinda also takes into account of everyday services like vets, groomers, and trainers who may reject him.
-As a whole, all the little things very quickly add up to something that I was VERY apprehensive on following through with. A high energy dog is one thing I can manage to keep up with, but having to put just as much energy trying to raise a pup in a world that automatically hates him is something I wasn't ready for.

I THOUGHT THE EXACT SAME THINGS you did when the handler said Australian Cattle mix. "They must be out of their mind suggesting such a dog to me!!" Which was why I never expected to meet the calmest and quietest dog I have EVER met. Even being surrounded by a dozen thunderous pitties barking and rocking their cages didn't faze him. Didn't even fuss about being crated after our meet and greet. I may have came off as living pretty lax, but I do go out a LOT. That and something just felt right. Je ne sais quoi if you will. With Jacob the puppy, something in the back of my mind always felt... off. That and as a very cute puppy, he has a much better chance of being adopted. Than any other dog in that shelter. If anything I think the handler will adopt him into her unbelievably large pack.
 

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Well you can't post that you got an adorable ACD and not post pictures!!

COngrats on the new guy. ACDs *can* be tough dogs but there are also tons that are super sweet, reliable, mellow dogs (like any breed!). Sounds like you got a good one. He might become more of a handful as he settles in and becomes more confident, but that's true of any dog. Ample exercise, mental stimulation, and training and you'll have yourself a partner.

It is amazing how sometimes it just clicks. We had that with our girl at the shelter. We went there to look at a different dog (also very nice) but there was something about this girl that just felt right. While we were out on a walk with her at the shelter she gave me this look at one point and something inside me said "this is your dog". We haven't regretted her for a second!

Enjoy your new guy -- AND POST PICS!! :D
 

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Thanks for replying :)
-I know all dogs benefit from a fence or secluded land. I can buy and install a tie out stake, but would always be scared if my sweet pittie were to pull it out and run off. Or finding out he's one who can jump a 6ft fence (or tunnel underneath). Of course I would never trust any dog alone on a tie out or inside a fence.
-I don't have to rent now, thankfully, but if I ever did owning him would make it nearly impossible and a little expensive. I tried it seriously for giggles and I can't imagine how any of you guys can do it! Lots of underhanded or passive aggressive declarations in rental offers. Always either a 35lb limit or "breed restrictions apply" for a little place in the heart of a crime dense city
-Nature of the beast right? I would have to be crazy not to accept certain risks. I know every dog is different, but terriers love a good chase. Learned that with a rat terrier. Every squirrel and bird she would chase but rarely got cause she was very chubby.
-Well if I were to move, there are lots of factors. There's at least 12 countries that flat out bans them, wouldn't even be able to say how many have strict BSLs. If I do deployments (highly doubt it though), it would be troublesome begging every person I know to look after him if the kennel turns him away. Then there are bases who have restrictions that may or may not allow him. On top of that, sometimes military family communities are very sensitive and love calling the military police over the littlest things, pretty much like condos or HOAs. Kinda also takes into account of everyday services like vets, groomers, and trainers who may reject him.
-As a whole, all the little things very quickly add up to something that I was VERY apprehensive on following through with. A high energy dog is one thing I can manage to keep up with, but having to put just as much energy trying to raise a pup in a world that automatically hates him is something I wasn't ready for.

I THOUGHT THE EXACT SAME THINGS you did when the handler said Australian Cattle mix. "They must be out of their mind suggesting such a dog to me!!" Which was why I never expected to meet the calmest and quietest dog I have EVER met. Even being surrounded by a dozen thunderous pitties barking and rocking their cages didn't faze him. Didn't even fuss about being crated after our meet and greet. I may have came off as living pretty lax, but I do go out a LOT. That and something just felt right. Je ne sais quoi if you will. With Jacob the puppy, something in the back of my mind always felt... off. That and as a very cute puppy, he has a much better chance of being adopted. Than any other dog in that shelter. If anything I think the handler will adopt him into her unbelievably large pack.
Thanks for clearing that up for me! :) I was just concerned reading your concerns (and thinking, well, a lot of these do come up with any dog) and not taking Jacob because of it, but then choosing a different (a herder! :D ) one.
But I see, yes, if it didn't 100% click with Jacob, then these concerns probably seemed impossible to overcome and if it then clicks 150%, it all doesn't seem too bad anymore ;) I can totally relate.

Luckily I don't rent, I own and our HOA and village have no restrictions.

But I have to say one more thing. Like the others said: PICTURES!!! :)
 
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