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I have a 4 1/2 month old Goldendoodle, and I was going to neuter him. But as I did more researc, I decided against it. Now I'm thinking about taking it one step further. I am hoping to get a Female Labradoodle next year, and breed the two dogs when they are about 2-3 years old. (Resulting in Doubledoodle pups.) But I'm not exactly sure if that's a good idea or not. :confused:If you have experience with breeding dogs, could you please share that knowledge with me? Thanks!

*Note*
I realize the care that needs to go into dog breeding. Please to not chew into me about wanting to breed my dogs. I will do it responsibly, if I do it at all.
 

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Does the world need more doodles? How about fostering some instead? I know that countless 'oodle' dogs wind up abandoned because, not being an established breed, there is no guarantee that they will turn out 'as advertised' (ie they wind up with the heavy shedding of a Labrador, high energy of a poodle, etc).
 

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Do you really know? I mean REALLY REALLY know the cost of care?

Are you planning to do blood work on both dogs to make sure they are no diseases they will pass on to pups? Are you going to make sure they don't have hip and elbow problems they can pass on to their pups? do you REALLY know?

Taking your dogs to the vet and asking are they healthy enough to be bred is not what we call 'required care.' that is the minimum care. An ethical breeder would take it above and beyond the 'minimum' care. This could cost anywhere from thousands of dollars. ( Especially if you have to do blood work on two dogs.) The costs quickly add up.

Then you have to line up homes. Ethical breeders have waiting lists for their pups that they have personally talked to, met, talked to some more and have passed their merit in what they consider is a 'good' home for their puppies. AND those breeders don't stop when the pup leaves their home. They want updates to make sure their pups they placed are taken care of and that they made the right decision by allowing you to have their pups.

what if someone can't care for the puppy you placed with them? Will you tell them it's your problem once the dogs leave my properity it's yours to deal with or will you say, yeah, thank you for bringing the pup back so I can find a more suitable home. (which is probably going to be harder since the pup will no longer be a puppy, but a crazed, adolesant pup with barily any manners.) Imagine two of the pups you found homes for coming back to you at this age, it will be more work then you want. YET ethical breeders do it because they want to make sure their pups never, NEVER end up in the pound, or shelter, or rescue group.

To me, if I saw your ad and I called you up to ask you a ton of questions regarding what you did with your doodles in regards to sport and you say nothing, they were both pretty and would make cute pups so I bred them because they would be double doodles... I would tell you thanks, but I think I will find an ethical breeder who does some kind of work with their dogs where a judge or judges award points/ribbons from a known kennel club.

Trust me, when I first entered this dog forum, my intent was to talk about my dogs and I was secretly wanting to breed. (But I was not going to let these guys know.) But as I red and remained an active part. (Even when I lurk) I realize that I am all the more wiser because of these guys. My reason for wanting to breed was because I wanted to make a quick, easy buck. But I would be considered a byber and I really respected these 'knowledgable' dog lovers here and wanted that respect too. So i backed down and decided that being a breeder is not the best way to make a buck and that if I ever wanted to be a breeder, I'd do it the ethical way.

So if you want to start in the breeding busness, please be an apprentice to an Ethical Breeder and they will lead you in the right direction.

You will be able to get experience more from them then you would be reading and asking questions from most of us who aren't breeders. The plus side, it will give you an insight to how much work and care it REALLY takes to be an ethical breeder.

I'm sure you don't want to be labeled a Backyard Breeder right? So if you want to be a breeder, do it the right way and find an ethical breeder who is willing to take you on as an apprentice. That is your best way to becoming a good and ethical breeder.
 

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If you have experience with breeding dogs, could you please share that knowledge with me? Thanks!

*Note*
I realize the care that needs to go into dog breeding. Please to not chew into me about wanting to breed my dogs. I will do it responsibly, if I do it at all.
You can't really say you "realize the care that needs to going into ________" after saying "I've never done this, can you tell me how?"
If you've never done it, why don't you wait and do what natengen says and pick up a apprenticeship and learn a little?
It's cool to have puppies because their so cute and everyone wants to see the miracle of life, but if you're not prepared, it can go wrong.
Good luck!
 

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But I'm not exactly sure if that's a good idea or not
Based on that sentence and the title of your thread - my answer would be no.

I realize the care that needs to go into dog breeding. Please to not chew into me about wanting to breed my dogs. I will do it responsibly, if I do it at all.
No chewing from me but do you mind if I ask what you consider responsible?
As natanqen pointed out, there is a huge difference between a BYB and a COE breeder.

In my honest opinion, the fact alone that you are here asking this question would have me so no, do not breed your dogs.

Ethical breeders take so much time (beside the working/showing the dogs, the tests, etc) into pairing dogs, planning the actual time of the litter, lining up buyers before the dog is even in heat.

It's great if you want to breed your dogs because you love this new breed and you want to see it flourish, and not just for a quick buck.
But, please take the time to talk to any COE breeder around you and find out what is actually involved in breeding and be smart and sensible about it. :)

What happens if your bitch needs a pricey C-section? If something goes horribly wrong while she is pregnant or while giving birth? Do you have thousands of dollars possibly to spend on a drop of a hat at the vets?

What if she can't/won't give them milk?
Are you ready to get up every xouple of hours to bottle feed them?

These questions are just the top of the iceberg.:eyeroll:
 

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If you choose to breed your dog to an unknown female, who is from even the "best" of "Doodle" breeders, you will not[/B be doing so responsibly. Please, if this is a serious post (I honestly thought this was a troll post), do not breed your dogs. Instead, go take a walk-through of your local shelter, or, if you do not have one, or do not have an overpopulation problem where you live, research some videos of shelters here in the U.S. I think you need a bit of a reality check when it comes to what irresponsible breeding is. When you decide to get a female, try searching for local rescues to go through instead of buying another designer breed. And please, again, do not breed your dog.
 

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No. Simply put. There are too many dogs in the world that need homes already. They might be taking the home of another dog suffering in a shelter or scheduled to die via a shelter.
 

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No, likely not.

I've always wanted to have a dog have puppies, but that isn't really a great reason. Even if the dog is a fantastic dog. If you're real keen on experiencing the miracle of puppy birth maybe get involved in a local shelter/rescue and make yourself available to foster a pregnant bitch.

There are just so many dogs out there as it is, in my mind I could never justify breeding (purebred or mixed breed) any dog.

I'm sure there are a ton of labradoodles or goldendoodles out there, and there will be a ton more in the next few years. I'm sure you could scoop up one or two from rescues and shelters and have your great dog act as a fantastic role model for them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What is your reason for wanting to breed these (these specific) dogs?
I love dogs, and I know that there are a lot of puppy mills out there. I don't expect to turn a profit, I just want to lovingly breed dogs the right way, not inhumanely. As for the doodles, I love the lab/golden mix, and the poodle just makes them smarter.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I know all of the work. I am training my Doodle in agility, and I hope I can apprentice to a reputable breeder. And trust me, I don't care about the money. I care about the dogs. But I will take into consideration everything that you have said. And remember, I'm just finding out more about it. I would be years from now before I ever start breeding, If I do decide to breed. But thanks for your help, you have definately put a lot of thought into this!
 

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I love dogs, and I know that there are a lot of puppy mills out there. I don't expect to turn a profit, I just want to lovingly breed dogs the right way, not inhumanely. As for the doodles, I love the lab/golden mix, and the poodle just makes them smarter.
No, I mean these two dogs in particular. What makes them the best choice for breeding? What do they bring to the table that others might not?
 

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A friend of mine bought a bloodhound. She was asked a number of questions about where the dog would live. She signed a contract that allowed the breeder to vist any time during the first year and take the dog away after returning the purchase price. After six months, they showed up - and drove 60 miles to do so.

Now that is a responsible breeder. I'd never consider breeding - not only because of all the stuff referred to above but because I couldn't be sue the puppies had good homes. And it would be my responsibility.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Based on that sentence and the title of your thread - my answer would be no.





In my honest opinion, the fact alone that you are here asking this question would have me so no, do not breed your dogs.
Well, that's why I'm asking! I don't have a female YET, and I'm just trying to find out more about it in case it's not a good idea. I wouldn't be breeding for at least two years. If I don't ask, how can I know?
 
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Discussion Starter #16
No, I mean these two dogs in particular. What makes them the best choice for breeding? What do they bring to the table that others might not?
Oh, I see. Well, we don't have a female picked out yet, but we will be looking for a nice, loose-coated, calm apricot/cream. My male is bouncy and loving, very strong-willed but smart. He's obedient, and has a good idea of what good dog means and what bad dog means. He knows if he's done something wrong before I do, and always tries to make it up in some way. He really has the perfect Goldendoodle traits in my opinion. He has blonde, straight hair that sheds little to none. He looks just like a teddy bear! He's VERY affectionate; his favorite trick is 'kissy!' in which he licks my face raw.;) So that's why I would love to pass his traits on.

*Side Note*
He also has webbed feet, which I just adore!
 

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What health testing do you plan to do with the sire and dam? You are aware of the many genetic problems both breeds can pass on to their pups?

What sort of financial contingency fund do you have if your dam needs a C-section? If she dies during birth, or shortly thereafter, will you be able to hand raise as many as ten puppies if the dam dies?

What sort of guarantee will you give the puppy buyers as far as being willing and able to take back a pup that doesn't work out? What will you do if you can't find homes for all the puppies? What sort of requirements are you going to impose on the puppy buyers?

Being a dog lover doesn't make anyone qualified to breed. Your posts indicate to me that you have a lot to learn before you are ready to be a responsible breeder.
 

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I love dogs, and I know that there are a lot of puppy mills out there. I don't expect to turn a profit, I just want to lovingly breed dogs the right way, not inhumanely. As for the doodles, I love the lab/golden mix, and the poodle just makes them smarter.
Here's what bugs me about calling designer dogs "breeds." Genetics are sort of like a recipe (four, eggs, milk = pancakes) but here's the difference: parents from the same breed have *somewhat* predictable traits (i.e. golden retriever: dad's a sweetheart that sheds and mom's a great hunter with allergies =pups are sweet hunters that shed and have allergies) because they've been bread for generations and have somewhat analogous basic temperaments and intelligence levels.

Designer dogs have far more random hereditary trait combinations. Sure, some of them will have flour, eggs, and milk and be pancakes, but others will be mostly egg with a little four and others will be too much flour and no milk. There's no way to know that a poodle will necessarily "make the dog smarter." You could end up with a shedding, hyper, long-haired dog with Lab brains (Labs are wonderful, but they're not brilliant).

Barring this issue, what are the parent's of your dog like? What are their OFA scores? Has either parent (or your dog) placed in agility or some other competition? What are 3 positive and 3 negative traits of both parents? These are not negotiable questions. Not only does your dog have to be excellent at something (enough for the world to need more of him, not just more loved puppies, if you want loved puppies, foster) but you have to know your line and be able to speak about it. Anyone buying a puppy should ask about your line and health issues that their new pup could face.

I just went through choosing a breeder and, honestly, I wouldn't have gotten a dog from you.

Just love the boy you have, foster some shelter dogs that need love. Spread love, not doodles.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Being a dog lover doesn't make anyone qualified to breed. Your posts indicate to me that you have a lot to learn before you are ready to be a responsible breeder.
That's very true. I am not nearly qualified yet, I just want to know enough so that I can be. I do have the time and funds for unexpacted emergencies. If you have anything more to share with me to help me become more qualified, It would really help. Thanks!
 
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