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my 2 months lab ret puppy doesn't follow me if she's leashed. she pulls her body away from me even if she choke herself to death. Then in the end, I'll just unleashed her and she'll run towards me and start biting again. I can't stand seeing her forcing herself to be free from her leash. In the end, seems like my dog is the one controlling me huhuhu! :(:(:(
 

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Flat collars, especally nylon collars are rather uncomfortable for dogs. I would try a gentle leader type collar or a halti.

Dogs that bite need muzzles and should never be unleashed. It's a hazard.

She's also only 2 months old. She should be in a harness at the very least.
 

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Welcome to Dog Forum and congratulations on your new puppy.

She's very young and has no idea what is expected of her. If she hasn't been exposed to a collar and leash before now, it's likely very weird and scary to her. Try letting her wear the collar around the house, feed treats, play games, make it a pleasant experience. Same with dragging the leash. She needs to get used to the sensation of something on her neck and body. Just be sure to supervise so that she doesn't get hurt and don't leave the collar and leash on when she's alone.

At the same time, you can encourage her to follow you using treats, play, and a happy voice. Puppies often do this naturally -as it sounds yours does. Also, "Loose Leash" walking

This (taken from the sticky) would be a good exercise for you to try:

Now the third (and my favorite) method...this one works especially well with puppies and dogs that have no history yet walking on a leash.

Start in a no distraction area...don't use a leash at first ...preferably inside. If your house is a tad small (like mine) we played this game outside.

get a pocketful of treats ready (make sure the treats are out of sight) and simply walk around...if your dog follows you closely say your marker word "good" "yes" or a click if your clicker training and then toss a treat on the floor preferable far away...

As the dog is looking for the treat walk away from him...if he’s keen he will rush to catch up with you...click/treat again when he gets to your side.

Once he gets that game when he returns to you wait a second and a half or so and see if he will walk with you for a step or two... if he does click/treat....keep gradually building up the time he has to stay by your side before you reward.

as he begins to stay near you more and more you may want to think about feeding him treats at your side from you hand or for toy breeds place the food on the ground by your heel...this helps cement in the idea that "this is the spot you should be"

Once he is staying at your side reliably you can introduce the leash and start the hierarchy all over...som' dogs will not notice the leash addition and you can continue the training...som' dogs may need to back up a few steps since you have added new criteria (the leash) and he may not understand that you want the same behavior as before...at first.

Once you’re a pro inside...move outside...or move from the back yard to the front...or the front to the street...etc etc...every time you go to a more distracting location...lower your expectations...and build back up to where you were.

the goal with training it this way is the dog doesn't ever make the on leash/off leash distinction...as he never had the opportunity to pull (since you taught him to stay with you before adding the leash) you will find that the dog will focus on you and not even notice if the leash is dropped.
At her age, I wouldn't be starting with no-pull collars, harness, and such. You can set a good foundation using a standard collar or harness.

For the biting, it's completely normal for a young puppy to bite and nip. They explore the world with their mouths. It's up to you to gently teach them appropriate biting (i.e., chewing) Biting, Mouthing, and Nipping

I would also forget about the idea of control. You're building a relationship with your puppy. Use positive reinforcement-based methods to teach her what is expected, pay attention to what she's telling you (Calming Signals), and you'll share "control."
 

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Flat collars, especally nylon collars are rather uncomfortable for dogs. I would try a gentle leader type collar or a halti.

Dogs that bite need muzzles and should never be unleashed. It's a hazard.

She's also only 2 months old. She should be in a harness at the very least.
The dog is just a baby. She does not need to be muzzled. like i said shes a puppy, she is young and trying to figure things out. If i were you i wouldnt put a gentle leader on a puppy. If the puppy runs out and then quickly snaps her neck. Puppies are growing and fragile (believe it or not).

Maybe you could try something like an easy walk harness where it clips in the front and carry treats as well. That when when she does something you like you can say "yes" and give her a treat.

I hope this helps.
 

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Start without a leash. Take the dog into a securely fenced area. Take treats and call her to you, praising her when she comes. Coax her to walk next to you and reward when she does. When she is gets to walking by your side, try using the leash. Reward her for walking calmly next to you.
I would use a harness. A flat buckle collar isn't really a good idea when teaching a puppy to walk properly.
 

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At two months I agree with posters above, start inside the house. I always get them used to wearing a collar first. When supervised I also then add the leash to drag behind to desensitize having the leash attached. Then with no distractions inside the house, I use a longer leash to walk around the house, and praising the dog for it's attention while I am moving around. Must first start with the dog being focused on your behavior while on a leash, and then move to teaching the dog your expectations. This can take months! Please be patient. Also for biting and nipping. There is a distinctive difference. When dog bites too hard yell Ouch or NO but do not punish.
 

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The Gentle Leader was one of the best tools for my pup and myself in training. It takes some practice and patience and some smelly treats.
You pup sounds just like mine did. Full of puppy foolishness.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thank you guys. These info helped me. I'll post update when coffee learns how to walk loose leash walking. I'm so excited to train her since she's my first pet. thanks!
 

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Everyone said all I would say! But I want to add that a puppy that young shouldn't be going on walks on the street or dog parks before she gets all her shots. She could get sick. It would be a good idea to put her in puppy play groups and a puppy class though. A good start is the best way to a well balanced adult dog! Good luck.
 
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The dog is just a baby. She does not need to be muzzled. like i said shes a puppy, she is young and trying to figure things out. If i were you i wouldnt put a gentle leader on a puppy. If the puppy runs out and then quickly snaps her neck. Puppies are growing and fragile (believe it or not).

Maybe you could try something like an easy walk harness where it clips in the front and carry treats as well. That when when she does something you like you can say "yes" and give her a treat.

I hope this helps.
Most homeowners/renters insurance doesn't care if the dog is 2 weeks or 2 decades old. Biting hard enough to draw blood is a liability and for many can constitute a bite history. You can't have a biting dog--puppy or not--in a public space.
 

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id get a harness, and just follow her wherever she wants to go, so she gets used to being attached to you.
and then work from there....
the baby is only 2 month old...so its still quite earlie...
 

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I'm sorry seashore but insurance or not the concept of muzzling a 2 month old dog to make it stop biting is ludacris. That's like putting a 3 year old in handcuffs for hitting. It also won't teach the puppy bite inhibition. This owner needs to teach the pup that and basic obedience and socialize her. A muzzle is NOT necessary and might cause more problems now.
 

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i cant see a 2 month old pup bite hard enough to draw blood...how...in what situation? should a 2 month old pup even be separated from its mom??
 

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I'm sorry seashore but insurance or not the concept of muzzling a 2 month old dog to make it stop biting is ludacris. That's like putting a 3 year old in handcuffs for hitting. It also won't teach the puppy bite inhibition. This owner needs to teach the pup that and basic obedience and socialize her. A muzzle is NOT necessary and might cause more problems now.
Look, I don't make the laws. If she wants the dog in public, and someone complains, the law is the law. Insurance agents don't really care if the dog is young or old or injured. Bite history, is bite history in the end, it just takes one stranger to complain. The poster mentioned the severe level of biting in the other thread.

If you don't want to muzzle, then please don't take your biting terror out in public. I wouldn't take a slap-happy 3yo out in public, either, but that's just me.
 

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Look, I don't make the laws. If she wants the dog in public, and someone complains, the law is the law. Insurance agents don't really care if the dog is young or old or injured. Bite history, is bite history in the end, it just takes one stranger to complain. The poster mentioned the severe level of biting in the other thread.

If you don't want to muzzle, then please don't take your biting terror out in public. I wouldn't take a slap-happy 3yo out in public, either, but that's just me.
The OP lives in MANILA, in the Philippines, are you aware if they have the same biting laws and insurance stipulations as the US?

Also, judging from the above, you are probably not a parent, especially one of a special needs child, you would never leave the house.

Two-month-old puppies bite, that's what they do, it is how they learn and explore their world through their mouths. They need to learn to live in the human world and that means how, when, and when not to bite. Putting a muzzle on a young puppy is abuse in my opinion, and sure to produce a fearful, shut down dog, who is more likely to be aggressive.
 

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The OP lives in MANILA, in the Philippines, are you aware if they have the same biting laws and insurance stipulations as the US?

Also, judging from the above, you are probably not a parent, especially one of a special needs child, you would never leave the house.

Two-month-old puppies bite, that's what they do, it is how they learn and explore their world through their mouths. They need to learn to live in the human world and that means how, when, and when not to bite. Putting a muzzle on a young puppy is abuse in my opinion, and sure to produce a fearful, shut down dog, who is more likely to be aggressive.
There have been times when a child was being rotten when I was in lockdown for months it seemed, but you know, I decided not to subject the public to that. My choice.

There probably aren't bite laws in the Philipines. Great. Let the puppy take a chunck out of someone. Atleast it's not in my backyard.
 

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@seashore Have you ever raised a puppy? I'm not asking in a nasty way, I'm serious. It's NORMAL for puppies to bite. It's normal for young puppies this age to bite hard, and yes, it sometimes draws blood. Their teeth are very sharp and can easily break skin. Asking a 2 month old puppy not to bite is like asking a 2 year old human not to put things in his mouth. It's unrealistic and unfair to expect a dog not to do that, and cruel to force him not to act normal. While it's a behavior that must be controlled and trained out, it's necessary for development. First of all, as I said before, a puppy this young shouldn't even be walked in public yet. She's too young and now that I realize this person lives in Manilla, it's even more dangerous to take a puppy this young out on the street.

Besides, generally dogs who bite people aren't those who are on leash. I can't think of many situations where a dog just charged someone while on leash and bit. They're usually roaming or interacting with someone in a home or yard or on a chain. It's not like the OP is going to bring her puppy to a playground of toddlers and let her have a go at them. Besides, this person could also tell anyone who wants to pet the puppy "Please don't, she's too young and hasn't learned to not bite yet".
 

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@seashore Have you ever raised a puppy? I'm not asking in a nasty way, I'm serious. It's NORMAL for puppies to bite. It's normal for young puppies this age to bite hard, and yes, it sometimes draws blood. Their teeth are very sharp and can easily break skin. Asking a 2 month old puppy not to bite is like asking a 2 year old human not to put things in his mouth. It's unrealistic and unfair to expect a dog not to do that, and cruel to force him not to act normal. While it's a behavior that must be controlled and trained out, it's necessary for development. First of all, as I said before, a puppy this young shouldn't even be walked in public yet. She's too young and now that I realize this person lives in Manilla, it's even more dangerous to take a puppy this young out on the street.

Besides, generally dogs who bite people aren't those who are on leash. I can't think of many situations where a dog just charged someone while on leash and bit. They're usually roaming or interacting with someone in a home or yard or on a chain. It's not like the OP is going to bring her puppy to a playground of toddlers and let her have a go at them. Besides, this person could also tell anyone who wants to pet the puppy "Please don't, she's too young and hasn't learned to not bite yet".
I've had one puppy before, a JRT, but she was nearly 4 months before I got her. She never bit hard, but she did enjoy mouthing. But nothing to the level the OP had in her other post. This dog's biting is dangerous.

My issue is with her taking her dog out in public and taking it off leash. That's why I suggested a muzzle. Her first post indicates that she takes the dog for a walk, the dog struggles so she lets the dog off-lead. Her other thread indicates the level of intensity of the dog bites. No, she's not bringing her dog to a playground full of toddlers, but she's in public with an out-of-control 2 month old dog. I am the one who first stated she should keep the dog home but if she had to let it out then she needed to protect herself and others.

2 months old or not, if she has to take him out in public she needs to be careful with him. One of the reasons my husband dislikes dogs is because he was bitten by an out-of-control collie/Shepard puppy when he was 6 or 7. The dog also "Didn't like" it's leash and was out in the front yard of it's owner near the public sidewalk. The dog meant friendly greeting but it was too quick and too big for a timid child. He wasn't injured badly at all, a scratch that didn't bleed...but from then on he saw all dogs as feral bite-happy creatures. He married me and became a member of a family with a dog but it's taken a good nearly 3 years of being around my dog for him to do anything more than tolerate her. He dosn't like to visit friends or family with dogs, even small ones--they make him nervous. that said, it's all about the person. His sister was also nipped badly--I think in her case there was even blood but she's gregarious and outgoing and still loved dogs. So a puppy bite won't "ruin" a person's love of dogs forever, but the impact of a dog bite sure can.
 

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I didn't read anything that indicates the OP takes her dog out in public, on or off leash. She absolutely needs to take her dog out into the world for socialization. Yes, she should take care while he's out for his sake as well as others, but a muzzle on an eight-week-old puppy is overkill and could have lasting detrimental effects.

Labs are mouthy breeds - that's what they do. Many young dogs draw blood or leave bruises when they bite, but they don't have the jaw strength to do real damage nor do they have the inclination. This isn't a dangerous or aggressive dog, it's a normal puppy of a mouthy breed. A four-month-old puppy is developmentally different from a two-month-old puppy, and a JRT is different from a retriever.

With a young pup, the owner's responsibility is to teach the pup when, where, and how much mouthing is appropriate. If she follows the advice in the links she was given, the dog will be fine.

Puppy Biting is Normal, Natural, and Necessary! from Sirius Dog Training
 
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