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Discussion Starter #1
I notice ALOT of people shave there single coat dogs in winter. My neighbour up the street got her cavalier/poodle cross shaved and told me her dog was shivering last night. I just cant get my head around why owners cannot see its cruel. Are they so lazy to bother brushing there dogs? I see these poor little dogs every year looking freezing while walking even the ones that have coats on
 

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My dog needs to be kept clipped year round as his hair mats quite easily, for example where his harness touches behind his fore legs. It's to do with the way he moves. He is also brushed regularly of course.

For winter he has a selection of warm coats though.
 

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I shave my little Poodle mix year round. Her hair just gets really out of control and gross - brushing/combing doesn't really hack it. She has lots of sweaters and coats though, and lives in a house with a warm fireplace so she's rarely ever cold.
 

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Our poodle/bischon mix has to be kept fairly short or she mats terribly. After even two or three weeks after a haircut, and daily brushing, she begins matting. I have yet to see her cold, but we do have a fairly temperate climate,
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies. 20yrs ago when i worked as a dog groomer it was very different. There were no hydrobaths, i washed the proper old fashioned way and we very very rarely shaved matted dogs. We spent time and using scissors and de knot combs could make a fairly matted long haired dog look great again. Most groomers are to lazy now to bother taking the extra time and just shave instead.
 

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I dont have dogs that need it but I know groomers are expensive.. I wonder if people cut the fur short all the time to avoid too many repeat trips to the groomer...
An older man in my street lets his dog's coat grow a little longer in winter , he has her trimmed but not shaved and as the warmer weather comes then she gets clipped short but she has a whole load of coats for cold evenings and mornings or wet days..
 

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My Bichon/Shih Tzu gets his hair clipped short year round. We try to keep it a bit longer in the winter, but it is very hard to keep it clean and un-matted when his hair is long. Of course we brush his hair twice a day, it is just much easier for his hair to be short. In the winter, he loves to play outside in the snow, and we do a lot of winter hiking, but when his hair is long, he gets awful snowballs...like so bad he can hardly walk with all the snowballs on his legs. So we clip his hair short and he has lots of warm jackets to keep him warm (including a full snowsuit with legs to keep the snowballs off lol). And yes, cost is also a factor, as is the fact that my dog hates going to the groomer. It is easier to cut him short every 2 months than trims every 3 weeks. Saves money and a lot of stress for my pup :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After reading replies i acknoledge i was wrong on judging owners trimming dogs in winter. I thought people were too lazy to brush so got them shaved instead. I do wish however the people i see including my neighbour who dont have coats for there dogs get them one. Its horrible seeing them shivering on there waks
 

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We shave ours, even in winter. she only goes out to potty in the winter, never long periods of time. we've tried coats, sweaters, boots, etc. but honestly for us it's just a big waste of money because the moment we put it on she manages to get them off. Any and all styles. so she goes out potties, then when she comes in i'll wipe her down and snuggle her in a towel for a few minutes.
 

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No wonder so many poodle-mixes needs to be shaved down considering the terrible coat a lot of them get from mixing two totally different fur-types...

It’s not uncommon that the coat type of these mixed bred dogs is extremely difficult (to not say impossible) to look after correctly and will get matted very very easy.
Not all poodle mixes have terrible coats. Any and every dog can matt when not taken care of properly. Of course any curly coat will matt way easier than a straight coat, its not due to having a bad coat. It's due to the type. If someone has curly hair they'll have to maintain they're hair, more so than someone with straight hair. That doesn't mean they have bad hair. I personally rejoice that there are so many options of poodle mixes now. We had a super tiny toy poodle and when she passed away, I couldn't find toy poodles easily in my area so I brought home a Yorkipoo and I was super thankful she was easy to find and had the curls bc my kids were super young and weren't ready for the where's puppy talk yet. its been 5 years since and we just finally tracked down another tiny toy poodle. as
 

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Not all poodle mixes have terrible coats. Any and every dog can matt when not taken care of properly. Of course any curly coat will matt way easier than a straight coat, its not due to having a bad coat. It's due to the type. If someone has curly hair they'll have to maintain they're hair, more so than someone with straight hair. That doesn't mean they have bad hair. I personally rejoice that there are so many options of poodle mixes now. We had a super tiny toy poodle and when she passed away, I couldn't find toy poodles easily in my area so I brought home a Yorkipoo and I was super thankful she was easy to find and had the curls bc my kids were super young and weren't ready for the where's puppy talk yet. its been 5 years since and we just finally tracked down another tiny toy poodle. as
”Doodles have one of the most labor intensive coats when it comes to grooming. Other long established breeds, like Poodles, Golden Retrievers, and Old English Sheepdogs have coats that were bred into them over tens to hundreds of years, to serve a specific function. Doodles are bred as large companion animals. Popularity of soft coat texture Doodles has caused this coat type to be in higher demand and the most common texture found. This coat is hard to maintain at longer lengths and can mat easily. Matting is painful and cruel to brush out in most cases, so day-to-day maintenance is essential.”
The Ins and Outs of Doodle Grooming | Furr: Pet Spa and Wellness


”While any dog with a longer or double coat can have matting, some dog breeds are more likely to mat than others — just ask any doodle owner. Doodle coats are a blend of a curly coat and a double-coat, making them the perfect storm for matting.”
Why Your Dog's Coat Gets Matted — and What You Can Do About It


”While labradoodles, that plucky mix of Labrador retriever and poodle, tend to be particularly vulnerable to the perils of matting thanks to their extraordinarily dense coats, we've seen plenty of breeds suffer from extreme matting.
[...]
And suffer they do. When knots form in fur, brushing becomes an exercise in agony as a dog's living hairs are torn from the skin. In addition to the discomfort, it can lead to health risks.
[...]
Victoria Aldred, a groomer at Barker's Pet Motel and Grooming in St. Albert, Alberta has seen that kind of unruliness all-too often.
"Lots of owners want their dogs long and fluffy but they think that growing it out simply means not cutting it for a very long time," she tells The Dodo. "The dog ends up getting terribly matted. When they finally go to the groomer for 'just the ends tidied', we have no other option than to shave."
"Doodles are so popular right now, but they have one of the most high maintenance coats around," Aldred explains. "Lots of people get them without realizing this."”
Here's A Scary Fact Every Dog Owner Needs To Know
 

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”Doodles have one of the most labor intensive coats when it comes to grooming. Other long established breeds, like Poodles, Golden Retrievers, and Old English Sheepdogs have coats that were bred into them over tens to hundreds of years, to serve a specific function. Doodles are bred as large companion animals. Popularity of soft coat texture Doodles has caused this coat type to be in higher demand and the most common texture found. This coat is hard to maintain at longer lengths and can mat easily. Matting is painful and cruel to brush out in most cases, so day-to-day maintenance is essential.”
The Ins and Outs of Doodle Grooming | Furr: Pet Spa and Wellness


”While any dog with a longer or double coat can have matting, some dog breeds are more likely to mat than others — just ask any doodle owner. Doodle coats are a blend of a curly coat and a double-coat, making them the perfect storm for matting.”
Why Your Dog's Coat Gets Matted — and What You Can Do About It


”While labradoodles, that plucky mix of Labrador retriever and poodle, tend to be particularly vulnerable to the perils of matting thanks to their extraordinarily dense coats, we've seen plenty of breeds suffer from extreme matting.
[...]
And suffer they do. When knots form in fur, brushing becomes an exercise in agony as a dog's living hairs are torn from the skin. In addition to the discomfort, it can lead to health risks.
[...]
Victoria Aldred, a groomer at Barker's Pet Motel and Grooming in St. Albert, Alberta has seen that kind of unruliness all-too often.
"Lots of owners want their dogs long and fluffy but they think that growing it out simply means not cutting it for a very long time," she tells The Dodo. "The dog ends up getting terribly matted. When they finally go to the groomer for 'just the ends tidied', we have no other option than to shave."
"Doodles are so popular right now, but they have one of the most high maintenance coats around," Aldred explains. "Lots of people get them without realizing this."”
Here's A Scary Fact Every Dog Owner Needs To Know
The last sentence you posted sums it up completely. “Doodles are so popular right now, but have the most high maintenance coats around” “ lot’s of people get them without realizing this”
It’s not a terrible coat but owners don’t research it.
That’s a problem of the owner not the breed or it’s coat.
 

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The last sentence you posted sums it up completely. “Doodles are so popular right now, but have the most high maintenance coats around” “ lot’s of people get them without realizing this”
It’s not a terrible coat but owners don’t research it.
That’s a problem of the owner not the breed or it’s coat.
No that doesn’t summarize it at all. You leave out the fact that they have a particularly difficult coat due to mixing a curly coat with a double coat and the extreme density of their coat. Unlike purebred dogs that have been bred to have a functional coat for centuries, the function of a doodles coat have been totally forgotten. Leaving them with an extremely difficult, in a lot of cases impossible, coat to groom and look after correctly.
 

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guess we'll have to agree to disagree. I don't feel their coats are "terrible" just high maintenance. there will always be people who prefer purebred dogs and some who prefer mixed breeds. I personally have a love of both. Either way i dont feel any are superior to another. it's just despends on what someone is looking for and wanting in a dog
 

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I agree, ours has a beautiful coat, though it is high maintenance. We knew that years ago when we adopted her, the trade-off being, no shedding. For us its a good trade, neither of us want all the loose hair in the house, and the maintenance and grooming needs are IMO well worth it.
 

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I agree, ours has a beautiful coat, though it is high maintenance. We knew that years ago when we adopted her, the trade-off being, no shedding. For us its a good trade, neither of us want all the loose hair in the house, and the maintenance and grooming needs are IMO well worth it.
Then I think we have different perception on what counts as a beautiful coat. For me it’s not just about a coat that is pretty to look at, but rather one that is functional and have high quality. In my book your previous comment of your dogs coat would fall under my description “It’s not uncommon that the coat type of these mixed bred dogs is extremely difficult (to not say impossible) to look after correctly and will get matted very very easy.”.

Dogs that don’t shed will always require a higher maintenance but the difference is that the purebred breeds have been bred to have a functional coat, which seems to often be lacking in the designer-bred dogs. If you don’t want a dog that sheds there are plenty of options that usually have much better coats than doodle-mixes. With coats that are actually manageable :)
 

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Sunflower, basically, as far as I'm concerned, if your not willing to do what it takes to properly take care of a dog, in all dimensions, you shouldn't have a dog. Maintaining their coat is only a single aspect of the care required, and frankly a minor one at that. The coat on ours is completely manageable, but it needs to be managed! Part of the responsibility of having a dog, and not a problem at all.
 

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I am going to have to disagree on the Doodle coats on some dogs. (Note I said some Doodles) I have a Golden/Poodle cross. She has a really easy coat, never mats and does not shed. My sister has two Goldens and they shed a lot. Bonnie's coat is not tight curls like a Poodle but just wavy. I also have a purebred Poodle and unless I keep her clipped short keeping tangles out of her coat would be a continual job. I do clip Bonnie in the summer as I usually do Agility with her and she also loves swimming.
 
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