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Discussion Starter #1
Shamas ate string from the roast. I hit the internet found instructions, and had him vomit. Thankfully the string came too. Hes still looking a little nauseated from the dose of peroxide...I'm wondering if I should make him go without his Nightly 1/2 cup for bed, and feed him in the morning. It'll throw his routine a bit, but he seems pretty tired so he should settle.

I'm just thnkful that he brought up the string, because I know that's a killer
 

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Jeebus! - that's scary.

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String or even thread can slice thru internal tissues - thank God U got it out quickly, & in one piece! - Was there more than 1 hunk?
Had the string been cut to remove it from the roast?

In pro kitchens, we use fishing-line to cut cheesecake neatly - it will do exactly the same to the bowel, tongue, esophagus, etc, IF IT'S PULLED ON... by the dog, by any well-intentioned non-medical person, by another dog, or if it gets caught on something, while it hangs from the mouth or anus.

My mother was a tailor; there were always scraps of fabric, thread clippings, fallen pins, etc, on the floor of her sewing room, & we used magnets to pull the pins out from between the floorboards; we kept the door shut if it was unoccupied, to keep the pets out for their own safety.
Despite our care, our older Siamese queen got ahold of a thread, & once it began to go down her throat, she perforce continued to swallow. There was a NEEDLE on it, which blessedly got stuck in her hard palate, & was removed with short forceps - she was OK, the vet knocked her out & used long curved forceps to reach into her gullet for the far-end of the thread, & carefully backed it out.
She was on soft food for a week, but recovered entirely.

I hope he's fine - dogs will eat anything that smells or tastes of food. :headshake:
Swallowing plastic chip-bags, the foil from an outdoor grill, sandwich baggies, STEAK KNIVES... Hachiko, the Akita that Japan so honors for his loyalty to his dead owner, died after some eejit fed him chicken, still on the bamboo skewers it's sold on, as street food. He ate it skewers & all.

- terry

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Discussion Starter #3
That's what I was afraid of. I learned the dangers of string when I got my first cat and went into a mad panick for days when a yoyo string went missing. Matt actually will go around and eat string on purpose so it's not allowed in the house, along with Yarn, or blankets that could come undone. He's also a very bad shopping bag-chewer ifhe can find them

So when shamas got the string, I knew exactly what it could do to his insides....just not what to do about it(Matt's vet told me to wait him out, and bring him in if he showed signs of distress) I found out on The Spruce(can I tell the website, or does it break rules here) how to make him vomit, and I did...and thankfully he brought up that 4 inch bit of string too. I was trying to figure out how much the surgery was because he's not on insurance yet, I just started looking into it, and decided which of our local vets we'll use for him.


I'll have to redouble my efforts on the "leave it" and "no beg.go." commands. I was distracted with serving up the kids, and one piece fell...I didn't realise there was string on it so I let him have it. I should have stopped him until I checked.
 

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other edibles that are potential killers

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given there are kids in the household, i'd put a gate across the dining-room or kitchen doorways, wherever the table might be, & he'd be on the opp side. :eek:

Kids WILL want to sneak food to a dog, or inevitably drop some, & he's inadvertently rewarded for cruising under the table [B4, during, or after the meal].
The gate gives U time to police under the table for stray bits, B4 he enters the room.

Onions
Chocolate
Macadamia nuts
Grapes / raisins
XYLITOL
...are all potentially lethal to dogs.

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener that used to be confined to "diet" foods - now, it can be anywhere. :(
In dogs, it causes a precipitous crash of blood-sugar; with a sufficient dose, the dog can be in a coma in 20-mins.
Eating Xylitol is a vet-emergency, no matter the size of the dog - it's the size of the DOSE that matters.
Tic-Tacs are the single most-likely killer, in the USA.
It's in toothpaste, baked goods, sodas, cosmetics [especially lip balm], candies, ice cream... Anything. :eek:

Read ingredient lists religiously to keep it out of the house as much as possible.
Toothpastes should be kept on a shelf INSIDE a cabinet, out of dog-reach entirely - & out of child-reach, as the kids are not likely to put it back there!
A small dog, under 20#, can die quickly of a tiny amount - a tiny dog, 5# or less, is at extreme risk if they consume any.


Over 700 products in an accessible list -
https://www.preventivevet.com/xylitol-products-toxic-for-dogs

that is NOT exhaustive - more are added daily. // Anything sugar-free, "healthy snack", or low-sugar should just be assumed to contain Xylitol, & presumed dangerous to the dog.
Dogs, unlike cats, have a taste for sweets - so a purse or back-pack is not the place for Tic-Tacs; dogs have pushed their noses in, found the flimsy boxes, easily popped them to shards, & consumed every candy, with dire results.
Leaving the dog in the car for 5-minutes with Ur purse could be lethal - nothing so ordinary should be that dangerous, but Xylitol is. // I'd keep 'em in the glove compartment, or preferably, find a Xylitol-free alternative, & eliminate one more hazard from everyday life. :thumbsup:

- terry
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks I'll check that out. Probably download it for reference too. I'm developing quite a bookmark folder for quick reference on dog info lol.

You're absolutely right on the child front. It's been a struggle to keep him away from the table. I' m now establishing "out" as the general rule for the kitchen, and "Shamas. No beg> go" for any time we eat. I''m NOT a fan of begging eyes at the table, nor dog slobber in peoples laps while they eat. i'd prefer the dog go lay down while we eat, and I'm going to talk to my dad about how he taught his dogs "don't look" I love that his dogs don't even look in your direction when you have food.

Dad says I'm doing very well with him, especially as he's my first dog. He's picking up fast.
 

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Bless the beasts & children, despite the frights they cause us.

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... or rather than cue "go", which leaves the option to return when U aren't paying attn or can't see him, U could:
- tether him.
- crate him during meals with a stuffed Kong, & his own meal in it.
- put a gate up, which keeps him out of the room & away from the table.

None of those rely on his own self-control, nor do U have to incessantly scan to see if he snuck back in; the tether, crate, or gate excludes him. // That's not to say the kids can't take him something!, LOL - pockets are mighty convenient for stashing a hunk of crust from pot-pie or pizza. ;)

If he finds a tidbit under the table once a month, that will keep the scavenging habit alive & urgent. :rolleyes:
Policing the floor to ensure there's nothing for him to get, will cause the habit to fade. // Hopefully, from here on, he lives a long & boringly healthy life, without swallowing string, wire, fish-hooks, magnets, PENNIES [solid zinc, now - very toxic], batteries, or any other inedible or dangerous items.

Pets & children... God knows, they're wonderful, but at the same time, they make yer hair grey early! :p

- terry

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Discussion Starter #7
So, we had Roast again..I got smart this time and immediately threw away the strings.

I tried the gate, which prompted growls, whines, puppy eyes and eventually he just popped right over and joined us under the table. I hate dogs under the table :mad:

Good thing the crate training's going well, I'll be able to use that during meals soon. As of today I have him to about 5 minutes quietly working his KONG before he barks, cries and tries to get out. He also knows "Go get your KONG" so that's making my morning routine easier, as I'm in charge of four pets, coffee, and waking up the teens who would prefer to sleep through their alarms lol.

I KONG and crate him, feed the cats, wake the first one and make coffee. Then I and let the dog out and go wake the other. Takes somewhere between 5-10 min?

This morning I came back and he was still happy so I took time to make my cup before coming in to let him out. I'd say we'ree doing great, as I only got the crate and KONG 3 days ago :D
 

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I love our crates. Fortinately Carly likes them too. :) We have two: a plastic one that is in the livivng room and a wire one in the garage. Our neighbors gave us the wire when we got C, and we use both regularly. She sleeps in the one upstairs at night, latched, and during the day escapes into it to get away from kids. We leave the door open and she willingly goes in. The garage crate is used when we are gone for several hours, and we can attach an ex pen to it so she can move around. She also gets dinner in that crate. We feed her while we eat so we can avoid the puppy whines and eyes too.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Right now Shamas sleeps in our room, loose. Often on the bed but he has bedding on the floor at the foot for those nights when hubby's home. It''s been well established that he's welcome to curl up with me, but the bed is off limits if husband is in it. He's a cat erson, and doesn't like dog-face in his ear when he's sleeping XD

When I get a second crate from my dad, it's going to go at the foot of the bed.

The livingroom currently has two- the canvas one we started with, and the wire one that we just got. I'll be taking the canvas one down soon, once I have a chance to steam clean it for packing. It makes a fine den, but you couldn't contain a dog in it, so it doesn't suit my needs
 

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Right now Shamas sleeps in our room, loose. Often on the bed but he has bedding on the floor at the foot for those nights when hubby's home. It''s been well established that he's welcome to curl up with me, but the bed is off limits if husband is in it. He's a cat erson, and doesn't like dog-face in his ear when he's sleeping XD

When I get a second crate from my dad, it's going to go at the foot of the bed.

The livingroom currently has two- the canvas one we started with, and the wire one that we just got. I'll be taking the canvas one down soon, once I have a chance to steam clean it for packing. It makes a fine den, but you couldn't contain a dog in it, so it doesn't suit my needs
I've seen the canvas ones. I know Carly would eat it or tear it up in a minute! So Shamas left it alone? That's awesome. Also, in reference to my previous post, I really do know how to spell "fortunately"... ;)
 

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Oh man, kids and dogs. I have 2 kids (5 and 2) and 3 dogs. Feels like 5 kids sometimes.

The older kid knows not to give food to the dogs. The 2 year old, on the other hand...I have a rule for both. When eating, kids stay at the table. Dogs are in their beds, practicing their "place" command. Plus, we are constantly brushing up on IYC with the dogs and reminding the kids NOT to give them their unwanted food. It's a circus sometimes, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I think if I'd shut the door, Shamas would have torn the canvas tent crate apart. But I only ever closed it for a moment or two while I went a nd fed the cats...not long enough for him to feel the need to break out on his own. I know the zipper has been repaired becausee my dad's first retreiver decided to leave through the closed door. once when put in there.

Meal times are getting better I think. I'm sitting here, timing how long Shamas stays calm in his crate, and it's been 20 minutes so far with the door shut. I'd like to build him up to where I can crate him from the time I start final prep to when I clear the table.

I often give him some meat and carrots after a meal, so I gave those to him in his crate last night. He was in the crate for the meal, but not alone- it was a casual meal, and one of the teens sat with him so he wouldn't get upset about being left alone and bark through the entire meal.

The current phase of crate training is to settle him in and walk away for something, coming back fairly quickly- so that he knows he's nt just being left in there. It's like having a 2 year old, he follow me everywhere and is underfoot :D But he doesn't do the classic Lab panic when his master leaves him outside a store so I'm hapy- instead, he finds the nearest window and looks for us inside. The staff at tims love his grinning face.
Once I can walk away in the house I'll start stepping out front and teach him that I'm coming back for him then too.
 
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