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Hi! I'm in the process of training my psychiatric service dog. I was wondering what are some things I should teach her that are non task related? Things that I may not think of right off the bat. For example, teaching her to lay under a table or chair. I know all of the basics. Just wondering about things that you may not think of until you go day to day with your SD. She is fairly tall (husky/malamute mix) that is almost 70 lbs.
 

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I'm assuming your doctors or the government has stated that you are legally disabled by whatever your issue is. First stop, any service animal should get their CGC at the very least. They need to be 100% perfect with work on/off switch amd obedience. They should be evaluated by a qualified person or organization that works with service animals.

Firstly, she is not a service dog. She is a service dog prospect or service dog in training. You can bring her places, but if someone asks you to leave, you have to. SDiTs are not afforded public access like full-fledged service dogs (depends on your state laws).

I would never recommend a Nordic breed for service work. They are great dogs in general; I love my brother's Siberian; however, they make terrible service dog prospects. They are far too stubborn, prey-driven, and otherwise difficult to properly train them for service. Especially for psychiatric work, if you're hell bent on this dog working go to a professional. Owner training is difficult and way more hit and miss than getting professional training.

Your dog needs to be 100% quiet ALL THE TIME. This will be difficult for a Husky mix. Your dog needs to be 100% non-reactive to distractions, people, other dogs, prey items. Your dog needs perfect manners. No jumping, no pawing, no interaction with other people or animals in general. Generally you need perfect obedience and that's it for basics before tasks. For your tasks, that's something you need to figure out yourself, and it LEGALLY must be something the dog does not do naturally. For example, my dog will shove a brush in my hands if I'm pulling my hair ouf of my scalp to interrupt and redirect my anxiety driven self-mutilation disorder.
 
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