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We rescued a senior female a while ago and she won't let us touch her legs or body. We can touch her head and back. She had been taking care of her nails, but then stopped. They are so long now that we have to clip them, but she growls and bares her teeth whenever we try. Does anyone had any suggestions? We tried putting a muzzle on her but that ended in a big struggle.
 

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Teaching a dog to be comfortable with nail clipping takes a lot of time. If you muzzle her and do it anyway, you might destroy any trust you have. How senior is she, and is it really necessary to do it? If it is, it might be worth taking her to a vet who might sedate her a little and do it.
 

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Teaching a dog to be comfortable with nail clipping takes a lot of time. If you muzzle her and do it anyway, you might destroy any trust you have. How senior is she, and is it really necessary to do it? If it is, it might be worth taking her to a vet who might sedate her a little and do it.
Thank you for your suggestions. She is 10 years old and her nails her really long. She has started to limp. She used to take care of them herself, but stopped. I didn't know that a vet would sedate dogs for such small procedures. That's great information. You have given me some peace
 

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I think if it is a welfare issue, they will.

10 isn't old for some dogs (depending on breed) so it might be worth desensitising her or possibly training her to scrape them herself on sandpaper.

There is an excellent Facebook group, Nail Maintenance for Dogs.
 

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I think if it is a welfare issue, they will.

10 isn't old for some dogs (depending on breed) so it might be worth desensitising her or possibly training her to scrape them herself on sandpaper.

There is an excellent Facebook group, Nail Maintenance for Dogs.
Many Thanks. 😃
 

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Short quicks are the preferred length for the dogs well-being and easy maintenance. Long nails can turn a sound paw into a splayed foot and reduce traction, and they can cause deformed feet and injure the tendons over an extended period. As the long nail hits the ground, the pressure puts force on the foot and leg structure. Take her to your vet they can either send home a sedative or sedate her for her nails to be trimmed. As some breeds nails curl (pugs in particular) they can grow into the foot pads causing pain and infection.
 

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Short quicks are the preferred length for the dogs well-being and easy maintenance. Long nails can turn a sound paw into a splayed foot and reduce traction, and they can cause deformed feet and injure the tendons over an extended period. As the long nail hits the ground, the pressure puts force on the foot and leg structure. Take her to your vet they can either send home a sedative or sedate her for her nails to be trimmed. As some breeds nails curl (pugs in particular) they can grow into the foot pads causing pain and infection.
Thanks for your help and advice. I have started working my way through the articles on the Nail Maintenance For Dogs Facebook page. We will be calling the vet to see if he will sedate her. We are both in our 70's and it is not easy for us to get on the floor with her. The Vet will be far less traumatizing for all parties.
 

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Long run ideas, maybe try using "positive association". Example stroke her foot then reward with a treat, repeat a few times then stop. Try it multiple times thru out the day, showing her that getting her feet stroked or touched is not bad. Eventully replacing a treat with affection, gaining her trust.
 

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Since you guys are talking about nails, I thought I'd ask a question that's been on my mind. My dog comes from a breed that can climb trees in pursuit of a prey. However, I've never seen my dog climb trees no matter how much she wants to kill the squirrels and other creatures she drives up trees. I wonder whether it's because her nails are always nicely trimmed. Do dogs need long nails to climb a tree -- you know, like a cat?
 

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We rescued a senior female a while ago and she won't let us touch her legs or body. We can touch her head and back.
Have you taken her to a vet to get anti-inflammatory meds and/or pain medication? Older dogs have aches and pains just like older humans . Joint supplements, fish oil, and a prescription or two, really can make a very noticeable difference in mobility and temperament. She will be happier if any aches and pains are noticed and addressed.
 
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