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My dog has started having seizures about once a month. What is considered a "severe" seizure? He paddles and drools profusely, also pees. Lasts about 3 minutes, then he's very confused and wobbly for awhile. Vet care is SO expensive, and I've read they won't medicate him unless seizures are severe. And we really don't want him on meds unless absolutely necessary. Is there a certain type of food that would help?
 

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And we really don't want him on meds unless absolutely necessary. Is there a certain type of food that would help?
Make sure your food and treats are color free. The coloring and dyes in food that make it those green and red colors can cause seizures. You will be looking for these titanium dioxide (color), yellow 5, yellow 6, red 40, BHA (used as a preservative), blue 1 . Only natural preservatives. BHA is cancer causing.
 

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frequency of seizures is even more of a concern than severity, though both are important concerns… once a month is far too often… the problem with frequent seizures is they lead to more seizures (priming the brain to do it again and again)… if you do not do something to stop them, they may become so frequent you may lose the opportunity to stop them at all and that would be very bad. Never heard/seen of any diet that has any effect on the average seizure- what age is your dog? Seizures that start at a young age tend to be epilepsy, while those that start at an advanced age are more likely something physically wrong with the brain (tumor most often, but granulomas, meningitis, inflammation and other physical problems higher on the list than epilepsy. Epileptic seizures tend to be more sensitive to medications that are for stopping seizure activity.. some seizure meds are pretty inexpensive. STill worth getting an opinion from your vet.
 

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Please get your dog to the vet to find out what is causing the seizures. You need to figure out what is causing them so that you can determine how best to treat them.
 
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frequency of seizures is even more of a concern than severity, though both are important concerns… once a month is far too often… the problem with frequent seizures is they lead to more seizures (priming the brain to do it again and again)… if you do not do something to stop them, they may become so frequent you may lose the opportunity to stop them at all and that would be very bad. Never heard/seen of any diet that has any effect on the average seizure- what age is your dog? Seizures that start at a young age tend to be epilepsy, while those that start at an advanced age are more likely something physically wrong with the brain (tumor most often, but granulomas, meningitis, inflammation and other physical problems higher on the list than epilepsy. Epileptic seizures tend to be more sensitive to medications that are for stopping seizure activity.. some seizure meds are pretty inexpensive. STill worth getting an opinion from your vet.
My dog is 11 years old. His first seizure was April 2013 (that we know of). He went over 2 years without, and is now having a seizure about every three weeks.
 

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That unfortunately makes brain tumor much higher on the list. if seizures every three weeks it is pretty important to stop those soon before they become more frequent. See your vet as soon as possible!
 

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Make sure your vet checks your dog's heart. Our dog had what looked like grand mal seizures but ended up being convulsive syncope from a heart arrhythmia. It's both the severity and frequency that is a concern for seizures. A vet visit would be a good idea as meds can be very helpful for seizures
 

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Heart? That never even crossed my mind. We started feeding him at night as well as his usual feeding time in hopes it's his blood sugar. But that didn't work. I'd read horror stories about the side effects of meds, so we are at a point where we don't know what is best for him. The ice pack on the small of his back shortened the seizure a lot, so we always have that on hand. He is so anxious and so disoriented after it happens. It just breaks our hearts.
 

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Veterinary care is a must as Rain stated.

An excellent book is "Canine Epilepsy" by Caroline Levin, but should in no way substitute for working with your vet to find out if the epilepsy is idiopathic or related to some other condition.
 

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My dog has both epilepsy and spay incontinence. For the spay incontinence, she is on a pink pill called stilbestrol ( a type of estrogen) It is very effective and so far no side effects but I am concerned about the dye they must be using for the color of the pill and that it might be a seizure trigger. Does anyone have info about this (or info about stilbestrol without artificial coloring)
 

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I have a Shih Tzu x Maltese that started having seizures when he was four years old. Even with all the tests I had done, they do not really know what is causing it. He had them about once a month for a couple of years but unless they came closer the Vet did not want to put him on anything.

A couple of years ago he had a cluster of seizures when we were in town and I took him right to the Vet. They gave him rectal atavan and they gave me some to take home. I have only had to use it once, then in 2014, he stopped having any seizures. He was 8 years old last October and even though the Vet said they usually do not stop having seizures once they start, he seems to have not had any.

I compete in Agility with him and he as never had any problems. The seizures he did have were usually at night, never while competing or running around.

Maybe ask your Vet about the rectal atavan. It is really easy to use, you just take a syringe without the needle and insert the liquid in their rectum. The drugs they use for seizures is much improved but once you start giving it, I think you have to continue on with it.
 
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