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My one year old pup has a ton of energy, and unfortunately we don’t have a fence. I’ve been training her on a 50ft nylon training lead and she’s been doing great on it and listens very well. We also go to weekly training classes to work on her impulse control.

Despite how great she’s doing, she still has her moments. The other day we were getting ready to come inside and she saw the dog two houses down and couldn’t contain her excitement and took off. She happened to be behind me, so as she took off he leash rubbed against the back of my leg and I now have a pretty nasty rope burn. So I’m looking into some tips to see what I can do to make the long lead safer for myself while also being safe for her.

I was thinking of getting one of those bungee leashes and attaching it to the lead, so that on those rare occasions where she does take off, the bungee will help reduce the impact, as well as keep my hand from being burnt because the handle is nicer. I was also thinking of getting on of those belts and attaching the leash to me. But I’m not sure if either (or both) of these options are safe, or if I’m just pulling ideas from thin air.

I know a lot of people let the leash drag, this way of the dog starts to run they can just grab it. But she is FAST so I’m afraid if she does go to take off, I won’t be able to get the leash in time. So I’d prefer to hold it or have it attached to me.
I know this probably sounds silly, but I want my dog to be able to enjoy herself and get her energy out so I’m willing to try what I can (I just don’t want another rope burn because this thing is pretty painful). So if anyone has any suggestions/tips, I would greatly appreciate it!
 

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For your dog's safety, a long line should only ever be attached to a harness, never a collar. This is because when she runs, she won't know when she is going to reach the end and she will get pulled up short. That could cause injuries to her neck and throat if it is attached to her collar.

For your own safety, you might want to look at walking belts. As well as saving your hands, it gives two other advantages. First, the additional security of it being attached and can't be dropped or let go. The second, being lower on your centre of gravity it means you have more power and you can brace yourself and lean back a little if she takes off again. I don't think you said what size or weight she is.

Another thing you can do is tie knots along the line, that will let you let out the line in stages and if she runs but you want to stop her before she reaches the full length, the knots will stop it from pulling through your hands and burning them. And you might find gloves useful too.
 

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Our long lines have a rubberized thread through them giving better grip but we never use them without gloves and we tend to use the two handed method so allowing the lead out loop by loop and reeling it in the same way. That way it cant get caught behind you legs or trip you up.. I learned the hard way that hitting even softish ground hurts...A lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
For your dog's safety, a long line should only ever be attached to a harness, never a collar. This is because when she runs, she won't know when she is going to reach the end and she will get pulled up short. That could cause injuries to her neck and throat if it is attached to her collar.

For your own safety, you might want to look at walking belts. As well as saving your hands, it gives two other advantages. First, the additional security of it being attached and can't be dropped or let go. The second, being lower on your centre of gravity it means you have more power and you can brace yourself and lean back a little if she takes off again. I don't think you said what size or weight she is.

Another thing you can do is tie knots along the line, that will let you let out the line in stages and if she runs but you want to stop her before she reaches the full length, the knots will stop it from pulling through your hands and burning them. And you might find gloves useful too.
Thank you! Yes, I only ever use a harness whenever she’s on a leash. The only time she has a collar on is at daycare, where she’s required to only wear a collar.

I do think I’m going to purchase the belt. After reading reviews, many people use it with their bigger dogs who pull so I think it’s worth a try. My dog is 45 lbs and pretty much all muscle, so as you mentioned I will (hopefully) be able to brace myself.

Thanks again!
 
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