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I adopted a 5 year old retriever mix a week and a half ago from a rescue. The dog came from a hoarder situation. The dog is extremely scared and anxious, especially around any people other than me. When she’s inside she’ll just sit or sleep in her crate, but whenever she hears me or hears me move she’ll get out of her crate, pace/jog across the two rooms she has access too before eventually settling in her crate again. She will not approach me when she is inside. Outside, she’s made great progress with walking on a leash and following me. She used to start running in circles if I stopped walking and stood still, but now she’s beginning to stand still and sniff the ground, ect. She even accepts being pet by me outside, and yesterday she came up to me and leaned against me. I’m not sure why she acts so differently indoors, but any insight onto how to precede with attempting to gain her trust is greatly appreciated!
 

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She needs time to settle in, to figure out where she is, where she belongs. It can take a rehomed dog sometimes weeks to months to settle into their new life, learn to trust and believe that their future hold good things for them. It takes time, it takes your patience, your compassion and your empathy.

May I suggest the book: Love Has No Age Limit - Welcoming An Adopted Dog Into Your Home - Dogwise by Patricia B. McConnell. It can provide some insight and guidance in how to help your pup.
 
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First, good for you for adopting this dog.

Second, this dog needs more than what a normal dog would need in terms of settling into a new situation, because she is coming from trauma.
From my rather extensive experience of working with foster dogs from terrible situations, I have learned some basic things:

--Everything must happen on the dog's time table, not on yours.
--Never try to get the dog to do something they don't want to do unless it is absolutely necessary, in which case do it in the most gentle manner you possibly can.
--Let the dog come to you. Always.
--Never make fast moves or loud noises around her.
--Do not focus on the fact of her past and don't tell everyone about it. Rather, concentrate on the present and let yourself and her forget the past so that a better future can be formed.
--Spend time just sitting next to her crate, or wherever she has settled, maybe reading a book, preferably on the floor right next to her.
--Reward every little move in your direction, but do it very quietly and calmly with a soft "good girl" and a nice treat.
--Don't be ambitious for the dog. don't make a plan that by X date she will be able to do something. Let it take as much time as it takes and be patient.
--Don't work on getting her to trust you. Just be trustworthy and she will learn on her own.
 
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