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Hi, all. In an effort to consolidate my exercise time and my dog's exercise time, I'm considering starting a running regimen. I've always been kind of anti-running, preferring the gym or a good hike, but lately it seems I have to choose between my exercise time and her exercise time (spoilers: she wins, obviously).
If you run with your dog, do you find that it helps fill their exercise need? I know that I can't run as fast as she can, so I'm wondering if it would. I would still do it either way, because at least she wouldn't be in the crate while I'm at the gym.
And do you have any tips? She's got pretty good leash manners (not perfect), and I'm a little worried that she might get overexcited while running and pull me off balance.
Lastly, she's 11 months old. Are there any detrimental effects from running at this age? Since I'm a novice runner, we'd probably start with pretty short runs anyway, maybe 5-15 minutes.
Thanks, All!
 

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lol thank you for making this thread. I have the same exact questions.

I have an 11 month old dog, and I've been exercising less and have actually gained weight since I feel bad keaving him coooped up at home while I go to the gym. I've replaced my workouts, lifting, and swims with dog walks and fetch, and it shows.

I also hate running.
 

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Unless it's a really large breed, most dogs growth plates are settled by 11 months so running is fine. Especially since you're starting at short intervals and working your way up, this is a perfect way to get you and your dog in shape for longer runs.

I would recommend running in a harness and a "bungy" leash. I use the Ruffwear Webmaster Harness and the Ruffwear Roamer Leash. The Roamer Leash is great because it can be used around the waist for hands free running or it can be used like a normal leash. It has elastic in the lower third of it so that if the dog pulls (trying to greet another dog or go after a squirrel or trying to stop to smell something) -- it cushions the blow so that you don't get jerked around. My girl is now very good about trotting alongside me but that leash made the training process so muchmore enjoyable for both of us :)

As for the running tiring your dog out -- it totally depends on the breed. I usually do 5-10 km (3-6 miles) with my girl (who is 13 months) and if we do it only on-leash then it hardly puts a dent in her energy levels. But she is a border collie cross, so a very active dog. If we do the same run through the woods and she is off-leash -- she is zonked out for a few hours afterwards. However I put a GPS on her once and for my 7 km run she had done nearly 30 km....so it's a huge difference between on-leash and off-leash for her ;)

Around me they have the wooded trail loops that have "work out stations" along the way, so I'll often do the loop and stop at the stations to do different muscle work outs so that I'm getting cardio and strength training. Usually at the strength stations I'll leash her and loop the leash around a tree or post so that she can't bother passerby-s or other people working out (another great aspect of the roamer leash! easily looped around things without having to unclip the dog!)

When starting out, just let your dog dictate to you when s/he needs a break -- but at 5-15 minute intervals, I don't see a problem.

ETA: Forgot to mention that the harness is to protect your dog's neck from being harshly jerked or him being thrown off balance. The webmaster harness from ruffwear is quite a large & intense harness but I use it because I also have a "backpack" that attaches to it for when I take my girl hiking (haven't introduced her to it yet...that's this spring's activity!). Plus once she's a bit older I'll use the backpack to "weight" her down so that for shorter run days or runs that she has to stay leashed to me she's got a harder work out. However, there are tons of harness options out there that are less expensive! Basically you just don't want to be attached to their collar.
 

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It really depends on the breed as mentioned above. My Aussie and I go for lots of jogs but it doesn't seem to tire him too much (probably because of how slow I run). That being said, running with your dog is a really enjoyable experience since the dog can be a great motivator! My boys got a front clip harness which discourages his pulling so we're running at the same pace. Also, don't forget water breaks!
 

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you must be pretty damn fast runner to make a dog tired just with jogging.
dogs are much faster and if they aren't extremely small or heavy they've got a lot more stamina than most humans.
it can help exercising, but i don't think the average jogging speed and distance will be enough to make most healthy dogs tired.
you'll have to do exercises that are metally challenging. :)

healthwise i tihnk it depends on the breed. If it's a big, slow maturing breed, I'd wait with running far distances in asphalt or concrete until they fully grown.
generally running on softer floor (forest floor for example) is better for the bones, joints and ligaments.
 

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I honestly hate running enough that this would never happen, but biking together-oh boy. I'm still working on conditioning her to pace herself so we can go for more than 30 minutes because she enjoys all out sprint pulling me, but it works really well up hills to go together.
 

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I'm a hiker and backpacker and I also hate running.

That said, I bike with mine a lot. I MTB (so always in the woods, on trails) and I've trained him to stay behind the bike at all times. I've found that I have to go longer than 10 miles at a decent pace to make a dent in his energy levels that day.

If the weather is cool and there's plenty of water in the area, I'll ride 20 milers with him and he loves it.

Edit: I've a 5 year old Lab. Been riding with him since he was about 2; he's in far better shape than I am, despite my regular exercise regimes. Haha.
 

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I honestly hate running enough that this would never happen, but biking together-oh boy. I'm still working on conditioning her to pace herself so we can go for more than 30 minutes because she enjoys all out sprint pulling me, but it works really well up hills to go together.
I'm a hiker and backpacker and I also hate running.

That said, I bike with mine a lot. I MTB (so always in the woods, on trails) and I've trained him to stay behind the bike at all times. I've found that I have to go longer than 10 miles at a decent pace to make a dent in his energy levels that day.

If the weather is cool and there's plenty of water in the area, I'll ride 20 milers with him and he loves it.

Edit: I've a 5 year old Lab. Been riding with him since he was about 2; he's in far better shape than I am, despite my regular exercise regimes. Haha.
Biking is a good idea, but if I'm being honest, I can barely keep myself balanced when I'm alone, haha.
 

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you must be pretty damn fast runner to make a dog tired just with jogging.
dogs are much faster and if they aren't extremely small or heavy they've got a lot more stamina than most humans.
it can help exercising, but i don't think the average jogging speed and distance will be enough to make most healthy dogs tired.
you'll have to do exercises that are metally challenging. :)

healthwise i tihnk it depends on the breed. If it's a big, slow maturing breed, I'd wait with running far distances in asphalt or concrete until they fully grown.
generally running on softer floor (forest floor for example) is better for the bones, joints and ligaments.
I think probably the first few times I would take her out, she might get tired, because it's a new thing and that would stimulate her mentally. It probably wouldn't work as well after we do it all the time.
I'm ok with that, because at least she would be getting some mental stimulation while we're running, as opposed to none if she were in the crate while I'm at the gym. And it would be a good bonding experience.
 

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Unless it's a really large breed, most dogs growth plates are settled by 11 months so running is fine. Especially since you're starting at short intervals and working your way up, this is a perfect way to get you and your dog in shape for longer runs.

I would recommend running in a harness and a "bungy" leash. I use the Ruffwear Webmaster Harness and the Ruffwear Roamer Leash. The Roamer Leash is great because it can be used around the waist for hands free running or it can be used like a normal leash. It has elastic in the lower third of it so that if the dog pulls (trying to greet another dog or go after a squirrel or trying to stop to smell something) -- it cushions the blow so that you don't get jerked around. My girl is now very good about trotting alongside me but that leash made the training process so muchmore enjoyable for both of us :)

As for the running tiring your dog out -- it totally depends on the breed. I usually do 5-10 km (3-6 miles) with my girl (who is 13 months) and if we do it only on-leash then it hardly puts a dent in her energy levels. But she is a border collie cross, so a very active dog. If we do the same run through the woods and she is off-leash -- she is zonked out for a few hours afterwards. However I put a GPS on her once and for my 7 km run she had done nearly 30 km....so it's a huge difference between on-leash and off-leash for her ;)

Around me they have the wooded trail loops that have "work out stations" along the way, so I'll often do the loop and stop at the stations to do different muscle work outs so that I'm getting cardio and strength training. Usually at the strength stations I'll leash her and loop the leash around a tree or post so that she can't bother passerby-s or other people working out (another great aspect of the roamer leash! easily looped around things without having to unclip the dog!)

When starting out, just let your dog dictate to you when s/he needs a break -- but at 5-15 minute intervals, I don't see a problem.

ETA: Forgot to mention that the harness is to protect your dog's neck from being harshly jerked or him being thrown off balance. The webmaster harness from ruffwear is quite a large & intense harness but I use it because I also have a "backpack" that attaches to it for when I take my girl hiking (haven't introduced her to it yet...that's this spring's activity!). Plus once she's a bit older I'll use the backpack to "weight" her down so that for shorter run days or runs that she has to stay leashed to me she's got a harder work out. However, there are tons of harness options out there that are less expensive! Basically you just don't want to be attached to their collar.
This is very helpful - I'll have to look into that harness and leash. Thank you!
 

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Glad this was brought up. My pup is only 8 months old, but we have been doing some short walk- jogs alternating running and walking for a max of 15 minutes. I let her dictate when we run and when we stop, trying to keep it more like play than anything sustained since she is so young. Mostly we focus on keeping it easy and fun and working on leash manners. I work on rewarding all running at my side. Funny enough, her leash manners are better when she's running than when she's walking.


I like those harness and leash suggestions.

As for stimulating your dog, tunnel ng the same loop probably won't give them much stimulation, but if you vary where you go, it might help. But as always, lots of mental stimulation at home is important.
 
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