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Hi everyone...I adopted a 1 year old female from a shelter about 2 months ago. We did everything...brought the other dogs to meet her at the shelter..brought my 5 year old daughter and everything went well so we took her home and she got really attached to me. So attached that she won't let my daughter near me..and my daughter just wants to pet her and hug her and the dog just growls at her and has bit her a couple times. She's a small dog so no real damage is done but I don't want to take that chance. The dog also poops on my mom's bed when I'm not there and she jumps up on table and counters . She got into cough drops a couple days ago that were on the table..among other things. I just don't know what to do anymore and everyone in my house says I should take her back..I don't think training is going to solve these growling and biting problems...anyone have any advice?
 

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All of these issues are definitely resolved with consistent training.

Pooping on bed: go back to housebreaking 101. Crated when you're not there to supervise. Taken outside for bathroom breaks immediately after coming out of the crate and multiple times a day - treated and praised whenever "business" is done outside.

Counters and Tables: How is a small dog getting up there? Keep the dog supervised and when you see her starting to go up, call her over/redirect her with a toy (redirect means toss a toy for her to chase, or play tug with her...whatever gets her attention off going onto the table and onto a positive behavior). If she can't be supervised (you're out of the house), then she's in her crate so that "bad" behaviors don't happen.

Growling/Biting: This is definitely the most serious, but also is still fixable with training. Depending on how old your daughter is, your daughter can also engage in the training. For this stuff, I recommend you get a trainer in to at least show you good exercises (and not a "pack leader" trainer but a positive reinforcement trainer -- much safer for reactivity beahavior issues). Generally you want to set up learning situations where your daughter is nearby but not interacting with you -- reward your dog for paying her no mind. Then have your daughter move slightly closer, again treat treat treat a calm dog. continue this very slowly to your daughter looking at you, your daughter touching you, your daughter sitting on your lap, etc. You treat whenever your dog is calm about the situation. Basically your teaching your dog "Little human being close to my big human is awesome because I get good things from it!" Eventually it just becomes habit and you no longer need to constantly reward your dog.

But again, I'd get a trainer in to really set you up for success and show you in person the specific timing of reward, pace of closing the distance between you and daughter, etc to ensure the best chance of a happy ending!

Good luck!
 

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It depends on what risk you're comfortable taking, and how much time/effort you can put into this. I wouldn't feel bad if you needed to take her back-it's difficult adopting a dog when there are children involved, especially at a young age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you..when I adopted her they said she did tricks. .I didn't know one of them was jumping up on tables. She is a Dachshund mix but very agile. She can jump from the ground into my arms when I'm standing. .she is super sweet except when it comes to my daughter and it hurts my daughters feelings. She hasnt drawn blood yet so I keep hanging on to the fact that training could work. She will go outside to go but if my mom leaves her bedroom door open, she will go on her bed. Both me and my daughter would fall apart if we had to take her back. I would much rather try the training first. Thanks all...
 

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Training can work if you are willing and able to put the time and effort in. Her growling sounds like resource guarding, and you are the resource she is guarding. I really do suggest getting a trainer, but stay way from alpha/pack leader type trainers.
 
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Honestly, 2 months isn't a lot of time. She's still adjusting. When I adopted my girl, it took her a good 6 months before she was really comfortable.

I think this stuff can definitely be resolved with training. Find a trainer in your area that uses positive methods. Also, please do not let your daughter hug any dogs. Your dog may get to the point where it's okay but after only 2 months in a new environment with new people and new stimuli, your dog is likely feeling overwhelmed. Hugs can make him/her feel confined and scared.
 

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I would like to start by saying I have no intention of offending you, or your family, but it sounds like you weren't prepared for a dog in the first place. When you adopt a dog, it is your duty to be prepared for things like this. I had to deal with growling too, but every action had an explained cause. My dog pooped in the house, he chased the cats, he snapped. But we gave him time, and we trained him, and he is a dream dog.

Second of all, your daughter needs to be properly educated on how to act around dogs. If she thinks that hugging a dog is an act of love, well I'll tell you right now-it's not. Teach your daughter that the dog needs his space. NEVER leave your child unsupervised with the dog, or any other children for that matter.

You should never return a dog, unless the dog is trying to kill people or doesn't get along with the original pets of the household. You are doing your dog a disservice if you return it, take the time to let your dog adjust. Give it mental stimulation, train it. It may take as long as six months before they can settle in.
 

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Being returned to a shelter, especially a public one, can have serious consequences for a dog. Dogs that are shuttled back and forth will develop more anxiety and exhibit more behavioral problems. Your dog already has a heightened state of nervousness and anxiety, and he'll likely resource guard his next owner even more. Also, depending on your local shelter policy and practices, owner surrenders run a much greater risk of euthanasia.

That being said, I'm not sure that your home is the best home for your dog. You have a small child, and your child's well-being comes first. Your dog would probably do best in an adult-only home, maybe even with a single owner who can give him undivided attention.

I have rehomed two dogs. I rehomed the first one through a private, no - kill shelter
The second one is now living with a close friend of mine and her family. I rehomed the second one because he resource - guarded me against my current dog. That second dog is much happier being a single dog and is much loved by my friend. In turn, my home is much calmer and my current dog is much more relaxed with my sole attention.

In your case, you might want to look for a more appropriate home for your dog. You could do that privately or by contacting rescue groups. Ideally, you would want your dog to go directly into another home instead of a shelter, especially a kill shelter.
 
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