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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is it possible to teach a dog a "respect" command, as in giving the person, or other dog, some space when given the command? and if so, how? thanks :D I've tried doing it the same way I taught her the "ignore it" command (ignores the toy/treat/...) but with people, but no luck.

Also, what could my mom do so that my dog would listen to her more? so far she only listens to me, but since I'm not always home, mom does have some trouble with her, so any tips on that as well? (maybe bonding more?)

Thanks :D
 

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what do you mean? Like a "move out of the way" type command?

Dogs don't generallize..... which is why they "like" or "listen" to one person more than the other... The other person just needs to spend time training the dog as well. The dog literally doesn't understand that its knowledge aplies in other situtations/or other people.



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Discussion Starter #3
Like when visitors come over, she would go greet them, but not everyone likes dogs, so I'd like to have a command to tell her so she would just leave them alone, or when we're at the park and she's off leash... so basically yeah, "move out of the way" type of command.

Ah, so mom just has to train her more, thanks :D
 

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Does she jump up on people? Is she just super excited in their faces?

You could teach her that she has to sit and wait for attention when people come over (you will need several "victims" lol to practice this with) or you can teach a "stay" or "go to your place" type command where she has to go sit on a rug or bed on the other side of the room.

which do you think will be more useful?

I also teach a "move" and I walk into the dog (gently)... the dog ussually jumps out of the way and the second they do I yell "yes!" and reward...repeat repeat.... useful if they are in doorways or your carrying som'thing and you can't see where they are.



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Discussion Starter #5
She doesn't jump (had a lot of work for that) but she does get very excited when people come, sometimes to the point of barking, which sadly not everyone can know if it's joyful or fearful, aggressive... type of barking. She already knows both of those commands, problem is she gets so excited she can barely control herself, any tips of that?
 

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She doesn't jump (had a lot of work for that) but she does get very excited when people come, sometimes to the point of barking, which sadly not everyone can know if it's joyful or fearful, aggressive... type of barking. She already knows both of those commands, problem is she gets so excited she can barely control herself, any tips of that?
If shes barking shes over threshold.... you need to work up to those excited situations slower and reward very frequently the same successes...maybe the person has to start outside but where she can see them...or across the room while shes on leash... get creative.

Reward quiet and ignore the barking... don't even look at the dog when it barks. The second she quiet say "YES" and keep funneling food as long as shes quiet. If she starts to bark again all food and attention stops again.

Over time you increase the amount of time she must be quiet before she gets the treat until you don't need treats at all.

Another method is simply have the person leave the second the barking starts. When she quiet they can come back in. If she barks they leave etc etc.

make sence? :)


are you familiar with clicker training? Its much faster to teach this with a clicker. :)

Theres also an impulse control game (which I think would be useful for your dog) that I can explain that will help her learn to think before she reacts. If you'd like to learn it. www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipT5k1gaXhc

Its geared toward food impulses but I find it helps in every other aspect because the dog learns to defer to you instead of react in other aspects as well.



Dog | Forum | Rocks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That actually makes sense, thanks :D

And yeah, I've been clicker training her from the start :D I also use a whistle for recalls.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hehe, yeah :D

Also, after this simister is done, I'm gonna work as an assistant trainer (ironically, the trainer is called Ze'ev (Hebrew for wolf)), so I'll learn quite a bit from him hopefully :D I also worked with the vet last summer, and he taught me a decent deal about canine psychology, forgot most of it though, lol
 

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Hehe, yeah :D

Also, after this simister is done, I'm gonna work as an assistant trainer (ironically, the trainer is called Ze'ev (Hebrew for wolf)), so I'll learn quite a bit from him hopefully :D I also worked with the vet last summer, and he taught me a decent deal about canine psychology, forgot most of it though, lol
aprenticeships are a good start. Im glad you have that kind of oportunity.

Make sure you get in the trainers head and find out the reasons they train the way they do...I have met apprentices that are simply regurgitating their mentors babble, but with no comprehension of why what works, works!!



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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah, I'm glad I got this kind of opportunity, I feel quite honored, since I just love working with dogs :D As far as I know, he's one of the best trainers in the country, whenever I talk to him, everything seems to just makes sense :D So, any tips I could use so I won't look like a total idiot, and give a decent 1st impression?
 

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Yeah, I'm glad I got this kind of opportunity, I feel quite honored, since I just love working with dogs :D As far as I know, he's one of the best trainers in the country, whenever I talk to him, everything seems to just makes sense :D So, any tips I could use so I won't look like a total idiot, and give a decent 1st impression?
Iam assuming this is a positive reinforcement type trainer?:D


Aside from the obvious stuff (like be polite etc etc) I would ask lots of questions and be prepared from constructive critisism and learn how to take it. Theres always more to learn and having a set of knowledgeable eyes to tell you what your doing right and wrong is wonderful!

just be a sponge. I know I would... also if you ever see som'thing you don't agree with (like lets say they bring out a e collar and start zapping for no good reason) don't be afraid to speak up or leave. I've heard of people staying in class even when they were uncomfortable with the methods being used.

I would also not only rely on the trainer to further your info...start buying books and sponging off them too...

also go watch a BAD trainer work. Seriously...I usually go to petcos and watch the classes... try to understand why they are doing what they are doing and why its not working. In fact I learn more from watching bad trainers than good ones som'times. Also if you are a PR type trainer watch a compulsion based trainer work. (like field dogs) the better you understand the whole playing field the better you can be yourself.:)

man I ramble.



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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, of course, I wouldn't work for anyone else :D

Well, I study English language and literature, so taking criticism (not just constructive) is well burned into me by now, lol and yeah, I agree, having someone correct you (nicely mind you, not barking at you without explanation) is always a nice addition.

When it comes to dog training, I first try the tool I'm using on myself, to see if it doesn't cause too much pain or is uncomfortable, as dogs are living beings as well, and not robots. Though I don't think this will happen with this trainer, since his main training collar is the Gentle Leader, and he only uses prongs on extreme cases (never seen him with an e collar).

Yeah, I'm looking for some dog psychology and training books to order from Amazon along with my Linguistics book, so any particular titles you'd recommend?

Really? watching a bad trainer? that never occurred to my mind, thanks, God knows, there's a bit too many of them around here, it does make sense in a way though.

I generally found that the best way is to have 90% positive training, but also 10% corrections are sometimes needed (maybe I'm still not good enough), I did find that too much corrections would make the dog fearful of you though, which could lead to biting in extreme cases.

btw, what do you think of this guy? his videos helped me quite a bit, but I'd like to get the opinion of someone more experienced.

Neah man, you don't ramble, you're quite helpful :D
 

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I too use corrections...but very very rarely... I found that as I made th e switch to positive training I didn't need them anymore... In time I hope to eliminate them 100% :)

haha the amazing dog training man!! I have a subscription to him on youtube. Hes great for directing people to basic stuff. He doesn't seem to cover anything advanced so I don't watch him often.

For more advanced and clicker stuff check out this trainer...YouTube - kikopup's Channel

have you read Karon Pryor's "Don't shoot the dog"? This is the ultimate book if you want to know about how animals learn and how operant conditioning works. If you haven't read it I strongly suggest you get a copy :) Also Jean Donaldson's "Culture clash" is a must must read.



Dog | Forum | Rocks!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, the better I get, I find that I need less corrections, though I still don't know how to teach "heel" or "no jump" without any corrections.

Yeah, he's pretty basic, but it's more than enough for most dog owners, not everyone want to teach their dogs crazy tricks (sadly, not everyone cares enough to give their dogs some quality time)

Wow, she's pretty good :D I'll watch her videos closely, cause those are some neat tricks she's got there :D

Thanks for the book recommendations, I'll go place an order :D, btw, any good dog psychology and body language books? I know the basic stuff, but I want to expand more on that.
 

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Yeah, the better I get, I find that I need less corrections, though I still don't know how to teach "heel" or "no jump" without any corrections.

Yeah, he's pretty basic, but it's more than enough for most dog owners, not everyone want to teach their dogs crazy tricks (sadly, not everyone cares enough to give their dogs some quality time)

Wow, she's pretty good :D I'll watch her videos closely, cause those are some neat tricks she's got there :D

Thanks for the book recommendations, I'll go place an order :D, btw, any good dog psychology and body language books? I know the basic stuff, but I want to expand more on that.
Jeans "culture clash" book will teach you som' body languange... also "the other end of the leash" By Pat McConnell Is great for other body languange stuff.

Right now I'm reading "for the love of a dog" by Pat McConnell. Its about emotions in animals. Also basic body languange...Really neat read...a little heavy in the begining.

Not sure what you mean by dog psychology...all I can think about when I hear that term is Ceaser Milan. :p



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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the recommendations :D

Psychology, as in how they think, and act, and why they do the things they do, you know, that kinda stuff. I think the books you recommended already cover this though, so thanks :D
 
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