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Has anyone had a rescue dog that was amazing in sports? I'm thinking about looking into an older rescue dog to get but I want a dog to compete with in sports.
 

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I've been following your other threads and I'm curious if you've decided if you are willing to wait until you move to get a dog?
 
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Are you moving away from your dad? I'm recalling your thread about him being hurtful to your chihuahua
 

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I would caution you to wait until you aren't living with your dad anymore or until you could teach your dad not to use the types of physical corrections that he is using. I understand the want of another dog but you are very young and the dog would be alone with your dad all day while you're at school. I'd be concerned with a puppy because of the intense needs and also the importance of positive potty training and I'd be very concerned with a rescue because many have been abused and would react very badly to being hit or forceably corrected.
 

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Both of my sport guys are shelter dogs. Both are young. The older of the 2 honestly has only fairly recently begun competing but he is doing really well. Placed in on his first 2 trials (one was a regional event even). Should be earning his first titles in both Rally FrEe and Treibball (NATE) very soon. The younger is only a year so still training. But I think he'll actually show his ilder brother up at some point.

Fwiw though I agree with waiting until you are out and on your own with a full time job. most rescues and shelters aren't going to adopt out to anyone under 18 years of age. They will require your parents to sign the adoption contract and in many areas will likely be the legal owners. Same with reputable breeders... Not going to sell to a 13 year old. Will require parents to sign the contract. Even many registries for competition are going to require parent guardian signatures in order for you to compete. And many trainers are going to require a parent attend classes with you.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Both of my sport guys are shelter dogs. Both are young. The older of the 2 honestly has only fairly recently begun competing but he is doing really well. Placed in on his first 2 trials (one was a regional event even). Should be earning his first titles in both Rally FrEe and Treibball (NATE) very soon. The younger is only a year so still training. But I think he'll actually show his ilder brother up at some point.

Fwiw though I agree with waiting until you are out and on your own with a full time job. most rescues and shelters aren't going to adopt out to anyone under 18 years of age. They will require your parents to sign the adoption contract and in many areas will likely be the legal owners. Same with reputable breeders... Not going to sell to a 13 year old. Will require parents to sign the contract. Even many registries for competition are going to require parent guardian signatures in order for you to compete. And many trainers are going to require a parent attend classes with you.
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My dad would sign everything. He said I could get another dog. I was watching my cousin's dog for a while for her. My cousin couldn't take the dog back and offered it to me. I didn't feel a connection with the dog for the 5 months I had it so I gave him to a new home. My dad said that because I didn't feel a connection with my cousin's dog, I could pick my own dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Both of my sport guys are shelter dogs. Both are young. The older of the 2 honestly has only fairly recently begun competing but he is doing really well. Placed in on his first 2 trials (one was a regional event even). Should be earning his first titles in both Rally FrEe and Treibball (NATE) very soon. The younger is only a year so still training. But I think he'll actually show his ilder brother up at some point.

Fwiw though I agree with waiting until you are out and on your own with a full time job. most rescues and shelters aren't going to adopt out to anyone under 18 years of age. They will require your parents to sign the adoption contract and in many areas will likely be the legal owners. Same with reputable breeders... Not going to sell to a 13 year old. Will require parents to sign the contract. Even many registries for competition are going to require parent guardian signatures in order for you to compete. And many trainers are going to require a parent attend classes with you.
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As for training, I would train myself. I have been researching R+ training for 4 years now and have trained dogs using R+ before (disabled, fearful, and reactive also) so training wouldn't be an issue.

For sport training, I would go through a local training place that requires you to be at least 12 to handle a dog on your own in classes.
 

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Boy. I feel for you. I know what it's like to be 13 and REALLY, REALLY want a dog. I mean want a dog so bad it hurts. Here's my advice based on what little I've read about your situation.

If you dad has ever hit the chi in anger, yelled constantly at the chi, kept the chi chained or locked up or any other abusive behavior, then you need to wait to get a dog until you are out on your own. If you dad has ever done any of the above to you, then you need to contact one of your teachers or an adult you trust. If he has done the above to any dog, then his behavior won't "magically" change when you bring in the new dog. You won't be able to protect it. You can't possibly be around the dog 24 hours a day, and even if you could, your dad would still be able to abuse it because of his size and authority in the house.

It would be very unfair to bring a dog into such a situation. As far as the dog doing sports, dogs who have been hit and abused don't excel in sports. They become too fearful to do well in the high stress situations of canine sporting competitions.

I so understand your strong desire to get a dog. I had that same feeling at 13 years old. However, consider this alternative.

Many training places have adults who trained their dog to compete in dog sports but then the adult developed physical issues that kept them from competing. The dog is fully trained, and often the adult would LOVE to have someone compete with their dog. This would allow you to have the opportunity to learn about dogs, dog training, dog sports AND enjoy the bond with a dog without worrying about what your dad may do to your dog. When you are out of the house, you will already have a huge running start on how to train your own dog and what sports you may want to compete in.

Email local training places...agility schools, flyball clubs, obedience schools, etc., and tell them your story. They may be able to match you up with an owner of a dog with some training. Then you can complete the training, build the bond and compete with that dog. :D

Do consider putting the needs of any dog you may get first. I would hate to see you stressed and worried about your dog's well being. When you are old enough, that control becomes totally yours. Right now, it's your parent's.

Can rescues to dog sports well? Yes. If the rescue has had a stable back ground and all else lines up personality wise, then rescues can compete - and VERY well - in canine sports. Does that mean you should get a dog right now? That is a question you need to answer. Give it an honest answer though.
 
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Dynamo. Working line (probably) gsd, found her at the dog pound, picked up as a stray, what a steal.
She was six months old, and a 'started' puppy. Obviously had a good background in motivational (+R) training, although the shelter workers had no clue.
They actually laughed at me when I picked her up, said she had 'no respect for humans'. Stupid humans.
She was awesome, plenty of drive, speed, pizzaz, and looks. Awesome. Her attitude to training was 'Give Me More! Now!' Awesome.
Maybe (okay, most likely), I got lucky.

Sonic is a rescue, and lived 18 months as 3rd world pet, no training, no leashwork, met good people and bad people, has baggage. He has drive but getting it focussed on me (or toys) is an uphill battle. But I think it can be done.
In 5 months he went from being completely passive in training (and often going into complete avoidance, as in running away from treats like they are poison), to finally showing some verve in offering behaviours. This is a big leap for a dog that likely learned to avoid trouble and solicit food by being passive. So it's happening, and it's exciting, but a whole different challenge from owning a working line gsd, and not only is he negotiating a difficult learning curve, so am I. He was not 'operant' but now he is becoming so, but still a delicate thing. Things that where easy with Dynamo (she did not shut down) are tricky with Sonic, but Sonic doesn't want to eat the cat, or the neighbours dog, and has excellent house manners, so I'm not complaining.
Will be able to say more many moons later. He is a work in progress.
 
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