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In the end of October of 2015, my family adopted our second dog from the Humane Society of West Michigan (adopted 4 all-together). This organization had received him from a kill shelter somewhere in Louisana. The HSWM takes a number of dogs from the south that are on "death row" to give them another chance up here in Michigan and he had been a part of this process.
He had been labeled as a boxer/lab mix ut we think he is much more than that, and may have been much more special than they were leading on. His coat is a deep brindle, being darker along his topline. I believe by definition he has a black mask. He has a splotch of ticked white under his chin and then a thin line of white leading down his neck to a patch of white on his chest that then leads by a thin line to his underside. All four feet are white. He came to Michigan un-neutered but we wanted him neutered. His dewclaws were removed and his tail docked when he was transferred up here. He has longer ears and a very strong, athletic build. After proper food and exercise daily he has thickened up and has muscular definition on his shoulders and thighs.
He has a very docile personality and extremely loyal to me. His bark is long like a coonhound. He knew things when he came to me and I'm slowly figuring out more of what he knows. He stands on his haunches frequently to reach things and is very attentive to commands. He stalks cats and chases bunnies, but what young dog doesn't? Anyway, I'm just wondering what he could be crossed with other than lab. My dad thinks bluetick coonhound but there has to be other possibilities. And is there any certain hunting dog commands that I could use under a scenario to test if he knows anything more than what's on the surface?
 

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How old is he? And how old was he when he was first surrendered to that animal shelter in the south? If he was very young it's likely that he wasn't trained as a hunting dog. If he's older, it's possible. But then again, being attentive to commands and having a high prey drive doesn't mean he was trained as a hunting dog, but rather he has the predisposition to be a good one. Personally I would try seeing if he responded to typical commands--sit, stay, down, etc. I can't say I know much about hunting dog training, but no matter what you train a dog to do, the basics are almost always the same.
 

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With him being a brindle color I would think more likely a Plott hound or cross. Most hounds that hunt do not have any real obedience training, they are set on the scent and follow it, usually treeing what they are after whether it is a cougar or some other type of wildcat or a bear. If he is a hound of some sort, it is a shame that they docked his tail. Did they think he was maybe a Boxer cross?
 

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@kylobernese sometimes when they dock their tails like that it's because they want them to be hog dogs.
 
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Do you have any photos you can post? That would help a lot.
 

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Would for sure be interesting to see him.

If he really is a Hound or Hound Mix, I could see it possible. Especially coming from the south, and more so, Louisiana; where while mixes and breeds of all kinds are common in shelters, Hounds especially can be from the Louisiana area. It is also not uncommon for hunting dogs to get lost, and not retrieved - or for them to be dumped if they're not working out. So even if one might not be a hunting dog, one could at least have some training.
 
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@Kyllobernese I'm not sure... however I looked up Plott Hound images and Wow! Spitting image of my dog!
@traciek88 Would they dock their tails for hog dogs to prevent extra noise while tracking? I was watching him stalk a bird this morning and he goes about it low and very quietly/carefully then takes off full throttle towards the bird, seems like that might be useful as to instincts of a hunting dog breed...?
@annageckos @The Dogs Before Time I posted some in an album on my profile, titled Zeus. I hope they help :) if not let me know and I'll post more!
 

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Less noise? Like from the wagging? Tails are docked off hog dogs and other hunting dogs (and ears are cropped) so the dogs aren't injured by the animals they are hunting. Tails and ears can't be tugged or ripped, which would weaken the dog and make them vulnerable to further injury or death. This is also why dog fighters crop their dogs' ears--less for the competition to hurt them with. Not that I condone such practices, but this is the reasons behind them.
 
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