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My dog regurgitated her food today - several hours after eating. Should I be worried? She’s vomited plenty of times in the past but today is the first time she’s regurgitated. I do think she has some reflux because she burps up liquid sometimes. I Googled it and it all said bad things can cause that.

Thoughts?
 

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Take the dog to the vet. Dogs to not vomit or regurgitate without a good reason and, a vet will have to diagnose the reason.
 

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Take the dog to the vet. Dogs to not vomit or regurgitate without a good reason and, a vet will have to diagnose the reason.
My dog would stay at the vet if I took her in every time she threw up. And my vet would think I was crazy.
 

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As I said there is a reason. Frequent vomiting is NOT normal. reason can range from diet to blockages to diseases, you need a vet to find out why the dog keeps vomiting.
 

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My boy has regurgitated food a time or two, as has the dog I pet sat for 3 weeks this month. My dogs in the past had all been known to occasionally regurgitate their food.

When it's a 1 time event, and so far that's been the case with my dog and the other dog, I don't panic, don't take him to the vet, but do keep a very close watch on him.

If he started vomiting, acting lethargic, had a habit of swallowing non edible objects, or acted sick he'd be off to the vet in a hurry. If he started regurgitating his food a couple times a week or month I'd be calling the vet and asking if I should bring him in.

My dog does get hunger pukes, those are when his stomach is completely empty and he throws up bile (yellow tinged, foamy, liquid). So long as I give him a snack right before bed he usually won't get them.
 

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My boy has regurgitated food a time or two, as has the dog I pet sat for 3 weeks this month. My dogs in the past had all been known to occasionally regurgitate their food.

When it's a 1 time event, and so far that's been the case with my dog and the other dog, I don't panic, don't take him to the vet, but do keep a very close watch on him.

If he started vomiting, acting lethargic, had a habit of swallowing non edible objects, or acted sick he'd be off to the vet in a hurry. If he started regurgitating his food a couple times a week or month I'd be calling the vet and asking if I should bring him in.

My dog does get hunger pukes, those are when his stomach is completely empty and he throws up bile (yellow tinged, foamy, liquid). So long as I give him a snack right before bed he usually won't get them.
Oh my old dog would get the hunger pukes too. My parents are watching her and they said she was sitting beside them and they had no clue she puked until she started licking her lips. And it looked just like her dog food. So I knew it was vomit.

I’m going to keep an eye on her. So far she hasnt puked since. She does have a history of swallowing inedible objects. She’s a 2 year old lab. Last month she swallowed an entire pair of underwear and then puked them up. She’s crazy.
 

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Oh my old dog would get the hunger pukes too. My parents are watching her and they said she was sitting beside them and they had no clue she puked until she started licking her lips. And it looked just like her dog food. So I knew it was vomit.

I’m going to keep an eye on her. So far she hasnt puked since. She does have a history of swallowing inedible objects. She’s a 2 year old lab. Last month she swallowed an entire pair of underwear and then puked them up. She’s crazy.

Since she does have a history of swallowing inedible objects keep a really good eye on her and if she does it again, or seems to be in pain or even just a little bit off, get her to the vet. Sometimes what they swallow blocks the entrance or exit of the stomach and that can cause regurgitation.

I
 

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Ours used to do that fairly often, until we discovered that she could not tolerate eating large quantities of food at one time. Now we feed her three to four times a day, and that problem has virtually disappeared.
 

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If it was just one time I wouldn't be worried much, but you said she's vomited plenty of times in the past and you said, "My dog would stay at the vet if I took her in every time she threw up. And my vet would think I was crazy. Which implies a LOT of throwing up, which is not normal. My sister's story may or may not be related, but I thought I should mention it.

My sister's German Shepherd was dropped of at a shelter, as a very young puppy, by the owners because they thought he was sick and dying. He would throw up just about every time he ate. He was in the shelter for about 4 months (kept away from all the other dogs cause they didn't know what was wrong with him, which caused social issues, which is a whole other story). A rescue group finally got him and took him in for testing. At this point he was 5 months old and only 26 pounds. He was very very skinny and only about half the weight he should be. In comparison, I currently have a 6 month old GS puppy and at 5 months old she weighed 43 pounds.

My sister was a volunteer with the rescue group and she became his foster. He was diagnosed with Megaesophagus. "Esophageal motility is required for moving food and liquid down to the stomach." She would hand feed the puppy small amounts of food several times a day. And keep all other food away so that he wouldn't throw it up. Because of his health needs he wasn't adopted and a few months later she adopted him herself. He grew to be over 100 pounds. He didn't need surgery, she just had to watch the type of food he was eating and how much/how fast.
 

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If it was just one time I wouldn't be worried much, but you said she's vomited plenty of times in the past and you said, "My dog would stay at the vet if I took her in every time she threw up. And my vet would think I was crazy. Which implies a LOT of throwing up, which is not normal. My sister's story may or may not be related, but I thought I should mention it.

My sister's German Shepherd was dropped of at a shelter, as a very young puppy, by the owners because they thought he was sick and dying. He would throw up just about every time he ate. He was in the shelter for about 4 months (kept away from all the other dogs cause they didn't know what was wrong with him, which caused social issues, which is a whole other story). A rescue group finally got him and took him in for testing. At this point he was 5 months old and only 26 pounds. He was very very skinny and only about half the weight he should be. In comparison, I currently have a 6 month old GS puppy and at 5 months old she weighed 43 pounds.

My sister was a volunteer with the rescue group and she became his foster. He was diagnosed with Megaesophagus. "Esophageal motility is required for moving food and liquid down to the stomach." She would hand feed the puppy small amounts of food several times a day. And keep all other food away so that he wouldn't throw it up. Because of his health needs he wasn't adopted and a few months later she adopted him herself. He grew to be over 100 pounds. He didn't need surgery, she just had to watch the type of food he was eating and how much/how fast.
I was exaggerating - but last summer she did puke a lot. Nearly everyday (sometimes 2-3 times) for a couple of weeks. She had several diagnostic tests and they said it was a virus. But that was vomit. I’m not sure I’ve seen her regurgitate before. She always has the abdominal contractions and retching. Worst sound ever.

She also pukes up dumb stuff that she eats - a rope, plastic bag, part of an “indestructible” toy, a sock, pair of underwear. I think that’s why I’m used to her puking - because there’s usually a reason.
 

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I would put things away which she has eaten before, my dog was a chewer but didnt swallow things, even so I became very careful about not leaving anything in her reach she could chew & poss choke on. She even gets things out of my bag, but now she brings them to me, instead of chewing them. That is cz I ve trained her to do that. Also sometimes the throat can become inflamed & once theyve puked they can be more prone to puking. If your interested in a natural aid try google "your old dog. a complete guide to natural & holistic dog care- marshmellow root & how to safely use it for dogs." The old dog part is the sight name, Im not implying your dogs old. My cat had an issue with gulping her food & regurgitating it. This stemmed from having other animals present at feed time. I had to feed her seperately. Small amounts of food is key. This product helps aswell in her water bowl. Its in the product calked DOKTA healing tonic. It helps with sick tummys even fevers.
 
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