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Discussion Starter #1
This is going to be a very long thread. I hope that those of you who arent looking to own one of these animals will read this and enjoy it and use it if you come across someone who DOES want a wolfdog.

I will be posting this thread as a series of sections because there is a an unbelievable amount of information that needs to be imparted concerning these crosses. Sections will be as follows:

1. What is a Wolf/dog?
2. How to Identify a Wolf/dog.
3. Wolf/Dog behavior
4. The Rabies Question
5. PROPER containment.
6. In the Eyes of the Law
7. Why BYBs lie about Wolf/Dogs.
8. the RARE reputable Wolf/dog breeder and how to identify him.
9. Rescue Links
10. Resources

feel free to ask questions but i would ask that you wait until i finish this because your question might get answered in a forthcoming section. i will be working on this for the rest of the day.
 

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1. What is a Wolf/dog?

A wolf is a primitive, intelligent, social apex predator species. A Dog is...well...nobody's really EXACTLY sure where dogs come from or why...but we do know they are genetically very very close to Wolves. They are considered the same species but because of their significant behavioral differences and some not so insignificant physical differences, they are classed as a different subspecies.

Wolves are dolichocephalic, allowing for the stereoscopic vision that contributes to their keen abilities as pack hunters of large game. and they are actual wild animals with wild animal survival instincts...if a wild wolf sees a human they will flee first and then fight if they get cornered. This is not something that is environmental...in other words...you can take the wolf out of the wild..but you cant really take the wild out of the wolf. its genetic. its estimated that it would take about 80 years of generations in wolves being very carefully selectively bred to start creating a truly domesticated wolf. Wolves have heads that are far larger in relation to their body size than any dog. Wolves, both male and female, are seasonally fertile. they only breed once a year and tend to have very small litters. Wolf pack structure is based on the family unit in the wild. the definition of Alpha in the wild wolf pack is the senior breeding pair. the other are subordinate because of their status as offspring of the Alpha pair. Captive wolves follow a similar structure unless they are a put together pack.

Dogs..on the other hand...run the gamut. the breeds typically used in the creation of a line of wolf/dogs tend to fall in the shepherd and northern/spitz categories. Male dogs are fertile year round and female dogs average two heat cycles a year. Dogs run the gamut from non social loners to pack mentality bullies to goobers who want to be everyone's friend and everything beyond, above, below, and in between.

So...when you mate a dog and a wolf...you could get.....anything. from dog acting wolf looking animals to wolf acting dog looking animals to wolf acting wolf looking to dog acting dog looking and everything in between. a total crapshoot similar to how a litter of designer bred crosses will run the gamut. except in this case the differences between the parents are far far far more profound.
 

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A freind of mine had a supposed 3/4 wolf. I always knew they were tough to have as pets. Seeing his wolf/dog reinforced that view. IMO, No-one should have one unless extremely experienced.

BTW Great post ZIM.
 

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2. How to Identify a Wolf/dog.
experience. or papers that arent forged.

When animals are evaluated for content, the evaluator looks at both behavior and physiology. Content isnt nessecarily representative of percentage of wolf blood.

like for example if you mate a pure wolf and a pure dog together, the resultant puppies will MOST LIKELY be identifiable as part wolf using the previously mentioned method of gestalt perception. if you cross one of those pups with a pure dog...its starts getting harder and harder. the puppies...even though only 25% wolf on paper may in fact have zero distinguishable dog characteristic and temperment classic to that of a wolf....or they may be vice versa and just like a dog.


some of the thing evaluators in these situations look for is dolichocephalic skulls. this means a long, narrow, large skull with almost absolutely zero angle to the stop. they look for thick fur lining ears that are smaller in proportion to the head than that of a dog and have a different texture to them. if it is a black animal with grey in the muzzle and chest that is older, they may try to find photo record of the young animal because black wolves tend to fade significantly more with age than dogs do.

there are also behavioral characteristics that they assess for.

Wolves and Wolf/dogs will be mouthier and pushier than a dog would with people they know. With strangers they will avoid avoid avoid or approach with extreme caution...generally speaking. they are also more likely to howl. LOUDLY.


there is currently no DNA test capable of assessing genetic content in a mix.


so unless you really really know what you are looking...there's really no way to know beyond a shadow of a doubt how wolfy an animal will grow up to be. which should give you some hints about what might be in section 8.:ponder:;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A freind of mine had a supposed 3/4 wolf. I always knew they were tough to have as pets. Seeing his wolf/dog reinforced that view. IMO, No-one should have one unless extremely experienced.

BTW Great post ZIM.
thanks. i think its really nessecary for this kind of info im posting to be readily available from multiple sources. ive posted one of these threads on every all breed forum i sign onto.

and not just experienced. owning a wolf/dog is likely to consume a majority of your time and attention. and money. they are probably the MOST high maintenance canine you can own. Not easy keepers. as you will see..
 

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Section 2 continued....


some pictures....the first three pics are the three most common breeds crossed with wolves. the fourth is a wolf.

the last photo is two hybrids. one low content and one high content. though these two arent from the same litter...you can have pups from the same litter who show the same magnitude of difference in physical characterics(and temperment but you cant get that from a photo) that these two do.

to be continued.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
while im typing up the rest of the sections i thought id post some vids of wolves...so you guys can get an idea of wolf behavior and how different it is from that of dogs.(and these behaviors are ones you can expect to see in a high content wolf/dog). these vids display the ritualized nature of wolf behavior and how a properly socialized wolf(and wolf/dog) would act in regards to a human.

YouTube - How to Photograph Wolves at Wolf Park

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3l2vihsQNY
 
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