Dog Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All.

June = 5.5 yo female lab/pit or boxer mix.

In August 2014, she began itching/biting her fur. It's not incessant, but we've had three incidents since then that have resulted in three vet visits and antibiotics. I should note that each visit has been to a different vet for geographic reasons.

The first time the hotspot was behind her left ear and the vet thought it was from her skin not drying properly after swimming. I made sure to extra dry her after that.

The second time the hotspot was on her underbelly and the vet thought it was the detergent I used on her bed. I washed her bed without detergent after that and haven't used that detergent since.

The third time, the hotspot was on her right rib cage. We live in Austin, TX but were in the Ozarks for several weeks for work so that dismissed Texas allergies as a possibility (she's never had any trouble before in the Ozarks). The vet thought it was her food.

She's been eating Canidae All Life Stages for over 5 years with no trouble. Does this seem right? If so, what do you all who have dogs with allergies use? I was advised to try Blue Buffalo. Any other recommendations? How long will the dog be on it before you notice a change?

Thanks for any advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
Hi All.

June = 5.5 yo female lab/pit or boxer mix.
Any other recommendations? How long will the dog be on it before you notice a change?

Thanks for any advice!
I would change the brand and the meat. I would recommend Zignature or Go Sensitive and Shine. My dogs do very well on the turkey. It takes about 3 months to really tell if it's working.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,712 Posts
Cut out chicken (or the meat he's eating now, if it's not chicken) and grains. I like Acana because they have a few nonchicken options- duck, lamb, pork and fish. Make sure the treats are the same meat and also grain free. (If the treats are one meat and the food is another and he reacts, you won't know which meat he's reacting to.) So if he's eating lamb, get lamb-based treats, etc.

Chewy.com has a huge variety of foods and treats, good prices and quick delivery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
Cut out chicken (or the meat he's eating now, if it's not chicken) and grains. I like Acana because they have a few nonchicken options- duck, lamb, pork and fish. Make sure the treats are the same meat and also grain free. (If the treats are one meat and the food is another and he reacts, you won't know which meat he's reacting to.) So if he's eating lamb, get lamb-based treats, etc.

Chewy.com has a huge variety of foods and treats, good prices and quick delivery.
This is what I would do. Food allergies can indeed show up later in life, though I've never had it happen in my personal experience. The below link contains the ingredients of your current food, so compare the protein sources to the foods you're considering feeding. My guess is that the chicken would be the likely culprit since it's the main ingredient, but perhaps not:
CANIDAE® Life Stages All Life Stages Formula Dry Dog Food


I feed Fromm grain free game bird with great success to my dogs, but mine don't have any allergy issues. It's something I'd recommend normally, but since it contains chicken (like your current food) perhaps you'd better off trying another variety. The beef does not appear to contain any of the same meats as your current food at a quick glance. Here's a link to some of the different grain free varieties they have:
Four-Star Nutritionals for Dogs - Fromm Family Foods

Like mentioned, make sure that the treats you give also follow the diet changes you're making. If your dog has developed a chicken allergy and you switch the food but continue feeding chicken treats then you may not see a difference.

Another possibility is that it could be something environmental.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,712 Posts
I became allergic to dairy at 33. Didn't figure it out until 35. That was a rough 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the recommendations, everyone. I'll do some research and follow up if I have any questions and keep you posted on what comes about. My vet recommended Science Diet DD or Blue Buffalo.

I currently give her Plato Salmon Treats and include Alaskan Natural Salmon Oil in her food -- would I need to take her off these as well?

Dawnben, 3 months to tell if it's working? Do you know why that is? Anyone else have similar experience?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
I currently give her Plato Salmon Treats and include Alaskan Natural Salmon Oil in her food -- would I need to take her off these as well?

Dawnben, 3 months to tell if it's working? Do you know why that is? Anyone else have similar experience?
If you want to identify a meat sensitivity you can only feed one meat at a time.
I don't know why 3 months. My guess is that it takes time for things to leave the body and time for the body to heal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
Thanks for the recommendations, everyone. I'll do some research and follow up if I have any questions and keep you posted on what comes about. My vet recommended Science Diet DD or Blue Buffalo.

I currently give her Plato Salmon Treats and include Alaskan Natural Salmon Oil in her food -- would I need to take her off these as well?

Dawnben, 3 months to tell if it's working? Do you know why that is? Anyone else have similar experience?
I wouldn't recommend Science Diet. Their ingredients are generally low quality and most vets have a conflict of interest when they recommend feeding it. Blue Buffalo is pretty decent, particularly some of their varieties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks DuckDodgers. I was thinking the same thing about Science Diet. The link that amaryllis provided is awesome and I've been sifting through my options.

Dawnben, I should've phrased my question better -- would salmon oil (not the treats) be a problem? I'm assuming the answer is yes unless I went with a salmon only feed. What do you guys use for alternatives for joint/skin? Flax oil? Coconut oil?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,712 Posts
If you want to identify a meat sensitivity you can only feed one meat at a time.
I don't know why 3 months. My guess is that it takes time for things to leave the body and time for the body to heal.
It takes time for the body to calm down and stop reacting. When I stopped eating dairy, the nausea, migraines and intestinal stuff stopped within 48 hours, but the joint pain, bone deep itch and acne took much longer to go away, around 6 weeks.

I also react to artificial fragrances and metals. After a couple of months of cutting out dairy (and several years of cutting out fragrances), my reaction to metals went away, too. Allergies feed off each other, one reaction boosting another. So if your dog is reacting to something in his food and also something environmental, cutting out the food may improve his environmental allergies as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,929 Posts
Thanks DuckDodgers. I was thinking the same thing about Science Diet. The link that amaryllis provided is awesome and I've been sifting through my options.

Dawnben, I should've phrased my question better -- would salmon oil (not the treats) be a problem? I'm assuming the answer is yes unless I went with a salmon only feed. What do you guys use for alternatives for joint/skin? Flax oil? Coconut oil?
Same answer one meat if that meat is salmons only great if its any other meat don't add the salmon oil. For joints I use this.
SUPER SNOUTS … JOINT POWER INFORMATION
For skin I would use the cold pressed coconut oil.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,820 Posts
Anyone ever used Natural Balance?
Natural Balance L.I.D. Limited Ingredient Diets Sweet Potato & Venison Formula Dry Dog Food, 26-lb bag

Looks like a solid fit for our situation. Made in the USA.

I used it when I was trying to figure out what my old dog was allergic to. I liked it because it had so few food ingredients which made it easier to figure out which ingredients my dog was allergic to.

It's not a food I'd recommend be fed long term since meat is not the first ingredient, and for the price of it I can find better quality foods, but for figuring out a food ingredient I think it's great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hot spots and relief

Hi, I just wanted to say hot spots are a bacterial infection,that start from bacteria, Not from an allergy, I go to johnny angel Kratom website and purchase the Hot Spot Kit, I just follow the directions, within a hour the itch stops and hot spots will start to disappear. very quickly in about 1 week they will disappear
completely , then every time some itch starts treat him again, catch it early
before the hot spot appears, and you can control the infections, and stop them.
need more info call me 954 644 1994:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts
What Johnnyangel said, hot spots are not allergy related. Unless it was your dog that chewed his skin and it got infected, then it is not a hot spot.

If it was indeed hot spots, shaving the skin so it can dry out will help tremendously. You can also ask the vet if they can give you a small bottle of the surgical scrub they use to clean the area, just clean it with the scrub once. I also soak with Epsom salts several times a day with a clean rag/paper towel soaked in the Epsom salts. I do this several times a day By doing all these things, the hot sot will heal in no time.

Do you remember if your dog had been itching/chewing when he got the spots?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Hi All. For some reason I wasn't getting email thread updates to these later posts.

We switched to Blue Buffalo Limited ingredient Salmon/Potato formula (http://www.chewy.com/dog/blue-buffalo-basics-limited/dp/28811)in mid-March and all of her treats have been salmon based with no other meats, accordingly.

The "hot spots" are still occurring. We've been able to prevent any major developments or infections by keeping a close eye on her and preventing her from making anything worse. Her entire underbelly and has mildly irritated spots here and there that I constantly have to keep an eye on to make sure she doesn't irritate.
@Johnnyangel + @timber -- I think it may be a skin bacteria or fungus given all that we've tried at this point. @timber, she was chewing/scratching those areas but it was hard to tell if it was causual or reactionary. If it was causal, I believe that she was scratching/biting the area into a hotspot overnight.

We NEVER had any issue until we swam in a certain pond here in Texas last August. I now think her condition it may have come from that but have no proof. Given that we live in central Texas (HOT) and she has very early hip dysplasia, I use the water a lot for exercise. No more water exercise would be devastating to her quality of life as she is still young and high energy so I want to figure out how to manage this.

I've scheduled an appointment with the vet for next Wednesday (5/27) to get her skin scraped and tested for any bacteria and fungus. Does anyone have any similar experience with skin bacteria or fungus? If so, how did you diagnose and how did you treat it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
My younger dog (13 months now) has gotten skin infections from swimming. The first time was last summer/fall, shortly before it got too cold to swim and not long after he was old enough for me to take him swimming. Since he was still pretty little and had little scabby bumps all over one side of him the vet put him on antibiotics. Cleared up no problem. The second time was probably a couple of months ago, and since he had a show coming up I put him on antibiotics again... didn't really want to be showing a patchy dog or waste the money spent on entries ;) That time it wasn't as bad... quite a few bumps that turned scabby and one kind of raw spot that I think I made worse by picking at it. A couple of weeks ago I thought it was happening again when I found a few bumps on him, but they went away. He's never been particularly itchy or anything, just gets covered in bumps on his torso.

All three times it was shortly after swimming in dirty water sources- the pool at the dog park (filled with on-site pond water), the retrieving pond, the dingiest, grossest mud hole he could find while hiking, and most recently the river. He LOVES swimming so I'm not going to prevent it unless it becomes a major recurring issue that he doesn't get over easily, I don't like putting them on antibiotics unless it's really necessary, and I try to only do full baths before a show or therapy work if they hadn't had one in awhile. I've started taking him into the backyard when we get home from a swimming outing and hosing him off really well without shampoo and drying him off as well as I can. Occasionally I don't as he's already completely dry by the time I get home, but I haven't had any problems since. If it happens again I'm going to try and let him fight off the infection on his own, though I'll obviously take him in if it looks like it's too much. If you're just drying your dog off then my guess is that the bacteria (or fungi) have already gotten into your dog's skin, so I'd recommend hosing if at all possible and then towel drying. This way the clean water has an opportunity to wash all the gross stuff off. Worst thing is perhaps you'll have to start bathing with a very mild shampoo after you go swimming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
562 Posts
I've scheduled an appointment with the vet for next Wednesday (5/27) to get her skin scraped and tested for any bacteria and fungus. Does anyone have any similar experience with skin bacteria or fungus? If so, how did you diagnose and how did you treat it?
Experience? Ha ha. Oh yes. My youngest, Spicey, had a catastrophic skin infection on her nose the winter before last. It went on for a mind-numbing 4 months. I'm not sure if it will help, but here's the very lengthy (11 pages) thread that I started when we were about a month into the infection.

It began as a bacterial infection (it was treated that way in the beginning at least, now I'm not so sure), and, at some point, was diagnosed as fungal near the end, when I ended up taking her to the U of I vet school in desperation. NOTHING was helping. To be honest, at the end, I think it just eventually ran it's course, but I've taken every. single. possible. preventative since then, to keep it from happening again. Change in food, a glass dish, supplements, everything. And it wasn't the money, though I'm pretty sure I spent over $1K over the course of it; it was just so wrenching and I felt so horribly helpless. So far as I could tell, she was never really suffering, I just couldn't make it STOP. I never want to go through that again.

Since this infection, if any pigmentation change or the slightest bubble of anything pops up on her nose (because she's a terrier, and if there's the slightest break in the skin, anything she sticks her nose in while she's hunting is going to be a catalyst for disaster, if you get my meaning), I "attack" it immediately with my trusty supply of KetoHex and MiconaHex wipes, which are both anti-microbial and anti-fungal. I might also dob a little bit with the lime-sulfur dip and some Lotrimin. The lime-sulfur is potent, so be sure and dilute it according to instructions if you have to use it. You can get all that stuff on Amazon.

Please let us know how it goes, I'm ever trying to keep up on stuff like this, just in case! Good luck! :thumbsup:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top