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Hi everyone,
I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas on how I can make the next week or so a little less miserable for my poor furbaby.

Genki is about 7 months old. She is an aussie x BC and she is a wonderful cuddly ball of fuzzy energy and athleticism. She normally alternates between flat out tearing around or wrestling with other puppies at the dog park, sleeping in the sun on the deck or the couch and curling up with her people whenever she gets the chance. We have been doing puppy teen classes which she absolutely loves and I'm really excited to start pre-agility with her when she gets a little older.

On Wednesday, we had Genki spayed. We have been trying to keep her calm to let her incision heal and she is trying so hard to be good but I feel terrible about how frustrated she is with the lack of exercise or other stimulation.

So far, we have been:
Doing short walks around the block every few hours
Working a bit on training a few times per day. I was hoping to work on some tricks or something but it's hard for Genki to really focus when she just wants to GO so badly
Giving her frozen Kongs and bones to chew on
Putting her food into puzzle toys

Anybody else with a super high energy dog have any thoughts on things we might be able to try?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!
 

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What about scent work?

Get some pieces of cloth and put them in a jar with some cloves to get them to smell.

Then, for the next few days, hide pieces of food. When your dog finds them, she can have the food and you reward with another piece.

When the cloth is ready, hide those, with a piece of food. Your dog should find the food and by default, the cloth. Keep rewarding with another piece of food.

Then after a few days of that, hide just the pieces of cloth. When your dog finds these, you can reward with a piece of food.
 

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I feel for you, having been in exactly the same situation with a border collie more than once! I have found that keeping the dog mentally stimulated is the best thing. good suggestions above. Also, hide-and-seek for a toy, a treat, or you, teaching her easy on the body tricks like picking up a certain toy by name and bringing it, or putting toys away in a basket. Anything you can teach her that doesn't need a lot of physical activity will help. Mental stimulation is just as important for a border collie or aussie as physical, and in a situation like this it can make all the difference.
 

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Nothing to add really, all the above is A+ solid. But, you can maybe try a few "intelligence test" games like the cup game. Maybe try to each her her cues with hand signals, and then written out--teaching her to read if you haven't. My girls enjoyed that, and you can maybe pair it with "wanna play a game?" This can help get you both in the right mental space. You can also think of this time as great practice for impulse control. It'll pass, even if you both are ready to climb the walls :)
 

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When my border collie had OCD surgery at 9 months of age, requiring several months of limited/restricted activity worked on helping him finding and engage his 'off switch' on cue by teaching the 'settle' cue.

Go Settle | Victoria Stilwell Positively

Once he understood 'settle' (on a mat) I helped him generalize the behavior to other locations, such as out in the back yard, starting with the mat, then practicing without the mat, and over time, rehearsed it on walks.
It may seem counterintuitive to try to teach a high energy dog to do 'nothing' ( doing 'nothing' uses up energy too) but a well rehearsed and highly rewarded 'off switch' is a wonderful and useful skill for any dog to have.
 
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