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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone recommend a dog breed for me? I was looking at a few breeds, but always come to a problem.

Collie
Good: intelligent, trainable, long-lived, and not too big.
Bad: the grooming demands are intense and the smooth variety is very hard to find.

Beagle
Good: Nice and small, not aggressive, easily found, inexpensive.
Bad: Almost impossible to train and to get to follow commands (except with food). They can also scale 2 meter tall fences which means I'd need to build an internal chain-link fence with inward-facing mesh canopy to prevent climbing over it.
 

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What are you looking for in a dog?
 

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As Denver215 said, what are you looking for in a dog? Do you have dog experience? Are you looking to get a puppy or adult? Are you looking to get a dog from a breeder or a rescue? Are you open to other suggestions for breeds? Can you tell us a little more about your lifestyle, it will help us get a better idea if either breed might be good for your lifestyle?
When you say you always come to a problem, what do you mean? no dog/dog breed is going to be %100 perfect for someone. Theres always going to be some sacrifices (both big and small) weather it be grooming, how affectionate the are, the high energy that comes with the smarts in some breeds, ect.
As for the breeds you mentioned, @patronizingrabbits would be a great beagle resource, @Sha @FinnAlva and @agility collie mom would be great collie resources.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
As Denver215 said, what are you looking for in a dog? Do you have dog experience? Are you looking to get a puppy or adult? Are you looking to get a dog from a breeder or a rescue? Are you open to other suggestions for breeds? Can you tell us a little more about your lifestyle, it will help us get a better idea if either breed might be good for your lifestyle?
When you say you always come to a problem, what do you mean? no dog/dog breed is going to be %100 perfect for someone. Theres always going to be some sacrifices (both big and small) weather it be grooming, how affectionate the are, the high energy that comes with the smarts in some breeds, ect.
As for the breeds you mentioned, @patronizingrabbits would be a great beagle resource, @Sha @FinnAlva and @agility collie mom would be great collie resources.
I am looking for a friendly companion. Yes, I have dog experience and would like a puppy. I prefer getting it from a breeder so I have a better idea of what I'm getting. My lifestyle is I work full-time, but otherwise have time to play with the dog. By problems I mean exactly what I listed. Just thought I'd get some suggestions.
 

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Hi! I have a rough collie named Ginny. She's just five months, so she's mostly puppy fur yet and not actual collie fur.

But! The grooming actually isn't that intense. They should be brushed once a week at least, but as long as you keep an eye out for mats, especially in mat-prone areas, it's not anything too tough. And if you don't like shedding, roughs are actually better than smooths because their hairs are bigger and thus easier to clean up, whereas smooths still shed, but the hairs are smaller and more difficult to clean up. ;)

Collies are wonderful, wonderful companion dogs! Mine is very smart, though, and she does require a fair bit of time in walking and getting mental stimulation, though I think her requirements are much less than what a beagle would need on that front. If you're going to be working all day, I suggest making sure you do meals in food puzzles for added mental stimulation, and possibly putting breakfast/lunch in kongs for added difficulty while you're gone. Also, if you're interested in a puppy, you're going to want to take time off or otherwise have a way to get home to let the puppy out while you're working. Ginny had to go every hour during the day at 8 weeks, though she was pretty much sleeping through the night right away. By 12 weeks she could hold it 2 hours, maybe 2.5 if pressed. Now, at 5 months, she's able to hold it 4-6 hours, but that's still shorter than a full workday. On the plus side, she was exceedingly easy to potty train, which is apparently decently common with collies. She only had about five-six accidents, and they were all the first week when I wasn't sure what her signals were yet.

With collies (well, any breed, but there are specific things to watch for with collies), it is important to make sure you work with a breeder who does health testing. MDR1 is very common in the breed, but also easily avoided with genetic testing and breeding. The same is true of CEA. There's more information on that front in the stickies in the New Additions subforum.

I think for your situation, a collie is going to be a better option, but I'm also quite biased. :) The grooming really isn't all that bad at all. It is more than a short-haired breed, but it's not awful and time-consuming as long as you stay on top of it.
 
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Personally I've had more experience with Beagles but both dogs are good companions. The thing is though that a Beagle is probably going to be happier spending a good amount of time alone than a Collie. Collies are typically higher energy and smarter than Beagles.

Not all Beagles climb fences. I'll admit I've never actually heard of one scaling one, but rather they can sometimes dig beneath them. As long as you don't leave your dog out alone for long periods of time (which can be dangerous for any dog) I'm sure it would be fine. Also the idea of them not being trainable is not that true. They're not as people pleasing as a Collie, they want something out of it but Beagles are trainable as well. Not to mention that it's always best to train any breed of dog with food first--no one works for free!

It does sound like you want a Collie more but with a full time job I think a Beagle would be a better fit. And with working so much it would be better if you got an adult or teen dog, but if you're willing to get a dog walker come a few times a day and/or come home on breaks you can probably do it. And if you do go for a Beagle it's totally fine if you go to a breeder but you can easily find lots of Beagle puppies in rescues and shelters.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Personally I've had more experience with Beagles but both dogs are good companions. The thing is though that a Beagle is probably going to be happier spending a good amount of time alone than a Collie. Collies are typically higher energy and smarter than Beagles.

Not all Beagles climb fences. I'll admit I've never actually heard of one scaling one, but rather they can sometimes dig beneath them. As long as you don't leave your dog out alone for long periods of time (which can be dangerous for any dog) I'm sure it would be fine. Also the idea of them not being trainable is not that true. They're not as people pleasing as a Collie, they want something out of it but Beagles are trainable as well. Not to mention that it's always best to train any breed of dog with food first--no one works for free!

It does sound like you want a Collie more but with a full time job I think a Beagle would be a better fit. And with working so much it would be better if you got an adult or teen dog, but if you're willing to get a dog walker come a few times a day and/or come home on breaks you can probably do it. And if you do go for a Beagle it's totally fine if you go to a breeder but you can easily find lots of Beagle puppies in rescues and shelters.
We want to get it from a breeder to avoid getting an older (and therefore less trainable) or psychologically damaged (abused) dog. I doubt many dogs end up in shelters when they're young and in good condition. I have seen some that look promising, but the shelter I checked wants hundreds of dollars for the transaction so it's not exactly a bargain.
 

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Get a collie puppy and just budget for visits to a groomer. If you work full time you will have to hire help anyway, you cannot leave a young puppy all day and expect that it will learn to be house trained, not to mention that your puppy will need companionship.
 

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Personally I've had more experience with Beagles but both dogs are good companions. The thing is though that a Beagle is probably going to be happier spending a good amount of time alone than a Collie. Collies are typically higher energy and smarter than Beagles.
Lies! People think collies are smarter because they are more obedient and pick up on training more easily but beagles are incredible problem solvers. The smartest dog I know is a beagle- he's a jerk (possessive, destructive, loud, rude, eats poop, can escape from anything), but he's smart! :p
 

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I doubt many dogs end up in shelters when they're young and in good condition. I have seen some that look promising, but the shelter I checked wants hundreds of dollars for the transaction so it's not exactly a bargain.
It depends on the area you're in. For example in the US, in the South there are a ton of puppies and young adults in shelters because they have an overpopulation problem. In the North, more of the local shelter dogs I see tend to be older or have some behavioral problems. However, we have so few local dogs in the North that a lot of rescues and shelters tend to transport up more adoptable dogs from the South (puppies, purebreds, small dogs, etc).

If you're not having any luck at your local shelter look into rescues- many of them tend to specialize in certain breeds or types of dogs.

Second thing, paying a few hundred dollars for a shelter dog is still MUCH cheaper than getting a dog from a reputable breeder, which can cost around $800-$2000+ depending on breed and lines. But that's only the initial cost- dogs from any source are going to need training and health care which can be costly as well.

If you want a dog from a breeder, go for it and don't feel guilty about it. But those are pretty common misconceptions people have about adopting dogs.
 
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