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I recently (2 months ago) adopted a cavalier King Charles spaniel. She is 4 and was rescued from a puppy mill. She has been timid since the day I adopted her which I heard from many people was normal and would go away in no time.

At the vet, I learned she has a severe double ear infection (this has since improved), a grade 3 luxating patella, and a grade 1 heart murmur.

Since bringing her to her first vet appointment, things have gotten much worse.
-She is much more timid. Now hiding behind and under things (like coffee tables and my bed) instead of just in the corner.
-She won't walk through doors. She will sit outside, shivering, while the door is wide open, before walking through the door.
-She won't walk down stairs. The only reason she walks up is to get to my room, where she feels safest.
-She's going to the bathroom inside more frequently.
-She's also shedding more now than she ever has - her hair is everywhere.

On top of all the newly diagnosed medical problems and worsening behavior, my four roommates are starting to lose their patience. Not wanting a dog going to the bathroom inside or having its hair everywhere are reasonable requests but I'm not sure where to go from here. I'm trying as hard as I can and most of the time it still doesn't seem good enough . I won't leave her anywhere I'm not, even if just for a few minutes. All of her stuff has been moved to my room. She is all but attached to me whenever I am home. It's worth noting, all four roommates were excited about the idea of a dog in the house before I adopted her.

Anyone have tips for helping puppy mill dogs acclimate and/or having a dog with roommates? So far, it's felt like everything I've tried, all the time and money spent have amounted to only backward progress.
 

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It sounds like she's going to need a lot of time and patience. Some dogs are naturally more on the nervous side, she might just need more time to be able to feel more comfortable. As she is from a puppy mill she most likely was not socialized or introduced to a lot of things if at all, and now she's in a brand new environment with 5 new people on top of being more on the nervous side and working through some health problems.
I would suggest having you and your roommates throw her yummy treats through out the day and maybe play or just spend a little time with her even if that's just hanging out in the same room, let her take it at her own pace. It might also feel more sucure if she has her own safe spot. If you have a kennel for her I would maybe add a bed/make it comfy and give her yummy things so she has some where were good things happen and it can become a safe place if she chooses.
As for the stairs and doors, I think that's going to be a combination of her gaining confidence and you showing her that going through door and going up/down stairs is a good rewarding thing.
For going to the bathroom inside, you might have to start from the basics and potty train her from the beginning. It could be partially stress, and or it could be that she doesn't know better yet.
Shedding again could be stress or possibly diet. But given her breed she might just needs a good brushing/more frequent brushing.
 

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It's highly likely that your home is not a good one for her. What I'm willing to bet she needs is a very quiet, low activity, home in order to begin to learn that life is not scary.

Right now she's likely very frightened, very overwhelmed, and very stressed.

Have you looked up working with puppy mill survivors? Here's a great article on it Puppy Mill Rescue Dogs | Best Friends Animal Society

A normal dog may, or may not, adjust to life with you in a few weeks or few months. A puppy mill survivor is likely to take many, many, months to years.

She highly likely has what's known as dirty dog syndrome. She spent the first 4 years of her life pottying where she ate and slept, never able to move away from it. She will be difficult to housetrain but it can be done with patience and consistency.

The shedding is probably from a number of things, the first two that come to mind being diet, and stress / anxiety. Both of those can cause an increase in shedding.

Thank you for taking her on! I really hope that your home can be the right one for her and that you can make it work.
 
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