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So I've been training my four year old dog to come when called, off leash in a quiet and enclosed environment. She's gotten very good at it and I'm thinking about taking a the training up a step by taking her into more distracting environments (using a long leash and harness). There's one instance in which she doesn't immediately listen to the recall command and that is when she's coming to me but smells a patch of grass that I assume another dog must have peed on or something. She'll stop and take the time to pee there herself before continuing on for me. If she's properly trained in recall, should she be ignoring these smells and coming immediately when I command it? Maybe I'm just over thinking this but I want to make sure that she's the best she can be in a non-distracting environment before making things more complicated for little, over excitable brain.
 

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Something that a lot of people forget is that a recall is a behavior chain. Part of that behavior chain for a good recall is the ability to leave distractions alone as the dog runs towards you. So, if it is important to you that she leaves the smells and runs to you straight away, take out that behavior in the chain (leave it) and practice that by itself before adding it back to the recalls.

I hope this made sense to you!
 

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Ideally, she should recall quickly and eagerly when you call her, even with distractions. There are a number of ways that you might be able to improve her responsiveness, and also, she may not be familiar with the idea of recalling from being "at liberty" if you normally recall her from a sit or down. I would maybe try adding in occasional "jackpot" (super high value) rewards, and maybe practicing using a restrained recall (have someone hold her while you back away happily, then recall her) to help create a little sense of urgency/desire to get to you. You may want to go back to using a long line so you can gently reel her in if she completely blows you off due to distraction. Also, recall her frequently when you are out, give a reward, then let her go back to whatever she was doing, so she learns that recalling is (usually) a temporary but obligatory interruption to her activities.

I usually teach my dogs a "formal" recall, but also (and use more frequently) a more "lax" cue to get them headed back into my area if they are getting out of range or we're switching directions, etc. Actually for my current dog, I sort of contaminated his formal recall by using it informally (among other cues, like "C'mon", hand wave, etc), though if I cue it "sharply", he responds in kind. So, make sure that you are keeping your expectations consistent, and not inadvertently rewarding informal recalls off your "formal" cue. I always tell myself that I'll reteach the snappy recall with a different cue word, but haven't yet gotten around to it because he's "functional" as is :)
 

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Try taking her to a place where there are some distractions, but you can still control her. For example, take her to a big-box pet store, find an aisle that isn't busy, and put her on a long leash. Give her a sit/stay and move down the aisle while keeping her on the long lead. Then call her. She'll have limited options for which direction she can go in, and you can control her while improving her recall.

Once she catches on, you can move to an aisle with more distractions.
 
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