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Hello does anyone have any tips regarding training recall to intact male dogs. I was recall training with a whistle using the Total Recall book for my 3 year old Irish terrier who has a high prey drive to chase, which was going very well for the first 4 or 5 months (during this time my 3 year old terrier was on chemical neutering for the first time via Suprelorin) and there was lots of progress with recall. However since the jag has now ceased and he's back to being intact full of testosterone again! I've noticed a definite change in obedience and his recall with whistle has deteriorated and he now often ignores the whistle completely when on walks. Very disappointing after getting quite far into the training program. He used to watch me and pay attention and engage while on walks but now he just keeps his head to the ground most of the time and wanders off (not too far from me) when we're outdoors sniffing and scenting and so when I blow the whistle he usually ignores it, only rarely does he come to me on command now. I am not going back to Suprelorin or neutering as aside from better recall there were more negatives than positives in my experience including some anxiety nervousness and aggression issues whilst on the drug which he hadn't demonstrated before and he's now much clamer, relaxed and confident but it's just that he ignores me and seems to be in a world of his own on walks and not as connected to my voice or whistle, is there any way you could provide some tips to train recall to intact males? Am surprised how being intact again has changed his recall behaviour considerably, maybe I should have waited to start the training after Suprelorin had ceased but I had lots of free time being on furlough and also I didn't think there would be any change to recall obedience afterwards when in reality the change has been very obvious and dramatic almost overnight in a short space of time of the drug wearing off, but let's hope I can restart and get him back to the recall level he was before which was actually pretty good and I was pleased at the success of the progress and how far we'd come. My dog now seems obsessed with sniffing the ground continuously on walks and marking territory and not much else distracts him anymore including my whistle :)
:)
thanks
 

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Don't let you dog be off leash while you are training recall. If you give your dog the opportunity to ignore you, you are teaching him that ignoring you is an option and he will exercise that option.

Keep him on a leash at all times when away from home.
Always call him with the whistle if that is what you want to use for recall, so that it is consistent.
Start training recall in the house, by blowing the whistle and following that with a yummy treat. Then, blow the whistle when he is in another room and if he comes, treat.
Next, once he is coming every time to the whistle indoors, take him out on a long leash. Whistle, if he comes, treat. Stay at this level for some time. If he doesn't come, reel him in gently, so that he has to come to you anyway, but no treat if he doesn't come to you on his own, just a "good boy", and on you go. Repeat a thousand times.

Make sure that you never call him to come to you if you are going to do anything that he doesn't like. So, don't call him and then take him home if he wants to keep walking Don't ever, ever call him to you and then scold. It always has to be pleasant for him to come to you.

If he gets to the point of always responding to your whistle, then take him somewhere that is fenced in...your yard?... and not too large, and try it off-leash, but make sure there are no distractions like other dogs. If he doesn't come, go walk him down calmly, (do not chase!), put him back on the leash, and go back to training with the long leash again.

This may take a long time because he is now accustomed to getting away with ignoring you. Just be persistent, never give up, and make sure that you are 100% consistent in what you do: never call him to you without there being some reward, even if it is just "good boy". Never allow him in a situation where he can ignore you. Keep him on leash.

The neutering issue is not really the main thing here, in my mind. Not that I am any expert on neutering and it's effects one way or another; all my dogs are spayed or neutered. But the main thing is the training, and it can be achieved with your dog if you go at it right and are consistent.
 
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