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When he is playing and rough-housing with his toys he never growls or barks. But he will set his sights on one of us,he will bite at our feet and arms while growling and barking.

My mother was sitting on couch and he came up and bit her sweater while growling, she got up and looked at him then he would keep barking and making biting motions when she would try to sit down.

We have put him in his pen for 15-30 minutes when he does that and he will cry like a baby right away, we let him out when he is calm.

I tried to hold him down when he is barking, growling and biting but he is too fragile to hold while he fights to get up.

This does not seem normal.
 

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I would guess that he isn't aggressive, this is just an extension of the boisterous play he had with his littermates but he needs to learn this is not how to play with humans. It often comes out of excitement from other play so if you can, stop the playing before he gets overexcited to this degree.

But if he does start, some people find a sharp 'ouch' works - but it can just ramp up the excitement. Some people find putting a toy in the dog's mouth works, others find the puppy is still more interested in nipping hands and feet.

My preferred method is to teach that teeth on skin equals end of fun. So as soon as he makes contact, walk out of the room for a few moments - it doesn't have to be as long as you are doing timeout in the pen, by that length of time he will have forgotten why he was in there.

As long as the whole family is consistent - do it immediately and do it every time - he will learn. You could use a house line to draw him away, which keeps your hands both out of reach and also keeps hands for only good things.

There is also something called ”extinction burst” that you should be aware of. This is when a behaviour that used to get attention no longer works for the dog so he tries it all the harder and it seems like things are getting worse, not better. This is good, because it means that what you are doing is starting to work!
 

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I left my dog in 'timeout' for no more than 5-10 seconds at a time - this is enough for them to learn that the fun stops and they don't gain anything by being left longer. In fact they are less likely to remember what happened that resulted in them being there.
 

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This seems like puppy play. If you watch dogs play with each other, you'll see them bite, growl, lunge, e.t.c Puppies are particularly rough because they haven't learnt how hard is too hard, or how much is too much.

Others have given great suggestions, but I just want to add that you should never hold your dog down. Holding your dog can be seen by your dog as being threatening or aggressive. This may encourage your dog to become more amped up or cause your dog to develop aggressive behaviors because they think they need to defend themselves.
 
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