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Please check out this video. I'd be interested in what others think of this.

Tibetan mastiff dog meets pitbull for the first time - Awesome Videos

For me, it illustrates an owner who is clueless on reading his dog's body language. His rottie's body is tense, and eye contact is too intense to force an interaction. It is clear that his dog should not be meeting the other dog at the moment, but he keeps pushing the interaction. Her dog reacts in response, and the poor woman falls down. Grr.

On a personal note, I sometimes encounter owners who insist on their dog meeting mine. I can tell their dog is too tense and will be reactive, and before I can say or do anything, the owner has blocked my path and wants a greeting with my dog . Then all of a sudden, their dog lunges and snaps at my dog's face, followed by an apology from the owner. Err, yeah, surprise. I get out of there with my dog. These situations annoy me.

Anyways, I'm not a fan of on-leash greetings. It's unnattural for dogs to meet face to face. Left to their own devices, dogs approach each other from the side or back which is less intimidating for both dogs.
 

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I agree. The pittbull looks like it would be completely fone, if the other dog wasnt tense

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"They're both pissed 'cause they're not fixed"

Are you freaking kidding me? Argh, I can't stand it when people have a mindset like this when it comes to training. Saying that a dog who isn't fixed is aggressive to other dogs because of that, and only that, is just simply incorrect. Neutering a dog can lower aggression levels, that's true, but not to this point. Those dogs are being aggressive most likely because they weren't socialized properly! Neutering a dog will not change the way that they behave around other dogs, except that maybe they won't be as territorial, and might not freak out around other unneutered males/unspayed females. But there are no guarantees even on that. I once knew a chihuaha shih-tzu mix, and he was unneutered, and he was one of the friendliest dog I ever met, even to other dogs.

It always bugs me when people just assume that there's something wrong with a dog that prevents training from happening, like aggression, or fear/anxiety, or too much energy, etc. In my opinion, there is no such thing as an untrainable dog. It just depends on how the owner handles them and what training methods they use and how they care for their dog(s). You see this a lot with the pitbull breeds, other 'aggressive' breeds such as rottweilers, German shepherds, etc. It just drives me nuts.
 

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Nothing like letting your dog greet another dog with a leash that tight. :eyeroll:

During the first interaction the Pit gets tight lipped - uncomfortable, the Rottie is staring at him. I also like how the guy says "I'll pull him as soon as he..." So you KNOW your dog is going to do that and still choose to push this interaction?

Second interaction "It's weird they're just staring each other in the eye". Yeah, not nice.


Side bar, I HATE when people say "fixed" when referring to spay/neuter. It implies there is something wrong with your dog if they are intact.
 

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The pit starts out as tense: lips tight, intense stare, slow/tense wag. It doesn't help remotely that the owner is basically hanging the dog with his own leash. On an aside-- judging from the end of the video where he pulls the woman down and the way she has a death grip on the leash--this is a very strong dog who would be MUCH better served with a harness (if only to save his trachea). There is no good reaction that can come from a dog on a leash that taut.

As for the rottie, he approaches rather confidently the first time and appears to aggravate an already tense, restricted dog. That said, I can't believe they decided to try the introduction again. The outcome is no surprise and those two idiots are lucky it didn't escalate further than that.
 

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"Nothing like letting your dog greet another dog with a leash that tight."

The outcome was mostly settled by :05 into the video where the lady telegraphed with her trepidation by tightening up on the leash.

The video did make me laugh a bit however.
 

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The ad for vet services looked appropriate--
not a fan of leashed greetings, what's the point.
 

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Not that it is germane to the OP's original question but the "Tibetan Mastiff......" , is that really a Tibetan Mastiff ? I'm not very good at breed identification as many others are in here but it looks more like a Rottweiler or some variant.

Meet and greets on leashes with certain dogs is always a bit tricky as noted by others. My experience suggests, sometimes it's okay to let them "spar" a bit based on the chemistry but if done properly and no teeth make contact, I'll proceed but no doubt a tight leash will never promote the best outcome if the dogs are allowed to make contact and sniff each other. Leashed dogs meeting each other, can at times become problematic if things go awry due to the leashes themselves if they should become entangled.
 

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I watched this without sound on, so without the benefit (though from comments here I'm not so sure it would be beneficial :rolleyes: ) of the verbal commentary by owners. That said, if you told me I had to introduce my dog to either the Am Bully or the Rottie in that particular video, I would probably pick the Rottie (ideally, I would avoid both). My guess would be that that dog might actually be ok meeting dogs which are not offended by his(?) confrontational greeting style, and he seemed overall less serious about actually getting a piece of the other dog. He tried to start trouble a few times, but spent much of the time on a (fairly) loose leash, even after he snapped at the Bully. Interesting that both times he lunged at the Bully, his owner seemed to be stepping forward/beside him- maybe he either took that as a "go ahead", or could tell that his owner was even more distracted than "normal".

The Am Bully may have been ok if his owner hadn't been practically picking him up by his collar, and the Rottie hadn't been so confrontational. The fact that his owner had him cinched up like a corset, and took the added measure of running the leash behind her butt to her other hand as well tells me that he has probably had problems meeting dogs on leash before. Of course, every time she shortens the leash, he becomes visibly more tense. It doesn't help matters that she's obviously expecting trouble, and her dog is probably reading that from her as well. That tail wag doesn't mean he wants to be friends with the Rottie. The Rottie wasn't really blinking too brightly on his radar until his owner choked up on his leash a few seconds into the video (he was looking at the Rottie owner), and he realized he was being challenged right as his owner cut off his ability to remove himself from the conflict (my guess is that he wouldn't have chosen to do so, but not having the option to move away still increases the conflict level). Hard to say whether he would have been ok meeting the Rottie if not being practically choked out- my guess would be still "no" because of the Rottie' overall demeanor/greeting behavior, but he might be ok meeting non-confrontational dogs in less confrontational settings. No way for us to know based on this video, since the dogs were essentially being set up to fight- even some "dog friendly" dogs will be ready to duel if faced off like that.

It would be interesting to see the dogs reversed, to compare the behavior again, and/or to see both with no owners involved, just tied out or with a fence (or two!) between them. My guess would be that these two particular dogs would still have a clash of personality, but I don't think either owner helped in this case.
 
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