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Pork doesn't have to be frozen. I have fed it fresh many times. Parasites are going to be in intestines which you aren't feeding anyway.

Wild boar is another story. Parasites boar into muscles as well as intestines, and while you can freeze it to potentially kill those parasites, the freeze temperature has to be much lower than the average persons freezer. Around -20 degrees.

Tapeworm larvae will be in the flesh of all pork meat if present in the host animal; it's only the adult worms that are in the intestinal tract. Larvae has even been known to burrow into the brains of infected animals. If you're going to raw feed, at least know the risks and don't wave them away when others have a legitimate question.

Pork must be frozen for an extended period (3+ weeks) or cooked before feeding. Humans who eat under-cooked pork meat (not wild boar) are at risk for trichinosis and ingested larvae can cause seizures in humans and animals.

Some of the dietary ideas for humans and dogs circulating around the internet make me believe humanity is going backwards into the caveman era. We've known for millennia that the benefits of cooking food vastly outweighs the risks, and yet, people are disregarding what humanity has understood for thousands of years and feeding a species inappropriate diet to dogs, feeding them like obligate carnivores and omitting the cooked meats and carbohydrates mostly from grains that dogs evolved on and adapted quite well to. Dogs in the care of humans never ate a carbohydrate free raw meat diet, and this is imperative to understanding canine nutrition because dogs evolved to be the species that they are today directly because of that same human intervention and adaptability to an omnivorous diet. Just as humans cannot look to our closest genetic relative and eat like chimpanzees, it is ludicrous to disregard the evolutionary history of dogs and feed them in a way they have not eaten for over 15,000 years, if ever.
 

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Pork must be frozen for an extended period (3+ weeks) or cooked before feeding. Humans who eat under-cooked pork meat (not wild boar) are at risk for trichinosis and ingested larvae can cause seizures in humans and animals.

Some of the dietary ideas for humans and dogs circulating around the internet make me believe humanity is going backwards into the caveman era. We've known for millennia that the benefits of cooking food vastly outweighs the risks, and yet, people are disregarding what humanity has understood for thousands of years and feeding a species inappropriate diet to dogs, feeding them like obligate carnivores and omitting the cooked meats and carbohydrates mostly from grains that dogs evolved on and adapted quite well to. Dogs in the care of humans never ate a carbohydrate free raw meat diet, and this is imperative to understanding canine nutrition because dogs evolved to be the species that they are today directly because of that same human intervention and adaptability to an omnivorous diet. Just as humans cannot look to our closest genetic relative and eat like chimpanzees, it is ludicrous to disregard the evolutionary history of dogs and feed them in a way they have not eaten for over 15,000 years, if ever.

Baloney. Fresh pork cooked to medium is lovely, been doing it for 20 years and never had issue. I could use a tapeworm to be honest, get some belly off me in a hurry. If I cook pork well done for friends around these parts - they won't eat it. Beef? I'd eat it raw if I could get past the texture - medium is the max. Some people can cook a steak rare - lovely texture.

Dry commercial dog food has been around for what? 60 years? Dogs evolved that fast?
 

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Tapeworm larvae will be in the flesh of all pork meat if present in the host animal; it's only the adult worms that are in the intestinal tract. Larvae has even been known to burrow into the brains of infected animals. If you're going to raw feed, at least know the risks and don't wave them away when others have a legitimate question.

Pork must be frozen for an extended period (3+ weeks) or cooked before feeding. Humans who eat under-cooked pork meat (not wild boar) are at risk for trichinosis and ingested larvae can cause seizures in humans and animals.

Some of the dietary ideas for humans and dogs circulating around the internet make me believe humanity is going backwards into the caveman era. We've known for millennia that the benefits of cooking food vastly outweighs the risks, and yet, people are disregarding what humanity has understood for thousands of years and feeding a species inappropriate diet to dogs, feeding them like obligate carnivores and omitting the cooked meats and carbohydrates mostly from grains that dogs evolved on and adapted quite well to. Dogs in the care of humans never ate a carbohydrate free raw meat diet, and this is imperative to understanding canine nutrition because dogs evolved to be the species that they are today directly because of that same human intervention and adaptability to an omnivorous diet. Just as humans cannot look to our closest genetic relative and eat like chimpanzees, it is ludicrous to disregard the evolutionary history of dogs and feed them in a way they have not eaten for over 15,000 years, if ever.
Do you realize the difference between domestic raised, USDA human grade pork vs. wild boar? Do you realize how much human grade pork I have fed over the last ten years unfrozen? There is so much here that I disagree with, that I am agreeing to disagree and not even get started......
 

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Baloney. Fresh pork cooked to medium is lovely, been doing it for 20 years and never had issue. I could use a tapeworm to be honest, get some belly off me in a hurry. If I cook pork well done for friends around these parts - they won't eat it. Beef? I'd eat it raw if I could get past the texture - medium is the max. Some people can cook a steak rare - lovely texture.

Dry commercial dog food has been around for what? 60 years? Dogs evolved that fast?
Fresh pork cooked to medium kills worms. Just like freezing for 3 weeks.
 

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Hard to tell in a pic. I usually consider the difference to be one of texture not color.

I'd call that either medium or medium rare since you can see the meat fibers. When meat is rare you don't really see the fibers. Looks yummy though, what cut is it?
 

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Hard to tell in a pic. I usually consider the difference to be one of texture not color.

I'd call that either medium or medium rare since you can see the meat fibers. When meat is rare you don't really see the fibers. Looks yummy though, what cut is it?
Just a pic I pulled off the internet, likely a loin. Cast iron is the trick, have a few 100 year old skillets here. Preheat skillet to 550 in the oven, bit of oil, butter and spices and sear both sides stovetop. Smokes like crazy but wow, fast cook. Crust on the outside, pink and juicy on the inside.


Anyhow, sorry, getting off topic here...
 

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Just a pic I pulled off the internet. Cast iron is the trick, have a few 100 year old skillets here. Preheat skillet to 550 in the oven, bit of oil, butter and spices and sear both sides stovetop. Smokes like crazy but wow, fast cook. Crust on the outside, pink and juicy on the inside.
Hmm I generally like cooking pork a little slower but that sounds exactly like the treatment my steak got just a couple hours ago. The only downside to cast iron is that it's such a pain to move around because of the weight.
 

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Baloney. Fresh pork cooked to medium is lovely, been doing it for 20 years and never had issue. I could use a tapeworm to be honest, get some belly off me in a hurry. If I cook pork well done for friends around these parts - they won't eat it. Beef? I'd eat it raw if I could get past the texture - medium is the max. Some people can cook a steak rare - lovely texture.

Dry commercial dog food has been around for what? 60 years? Dogs evolved that fast?


Commercial kibbles have been around well over a century now. I am an avid collector of vintage dog books for my breed, and have located a reprint of an old dog anthology from the early 1890s which has both feeding advice that includes dog "meals" and advertisements for the commercial meals that would become the progenitors of dry kibble. Purina alone has been around for over 85 years, however, it was mainly breeding kennels that would feed "meals" until the 1930s onward.

That is beside the point, though.

Dogs could not have evolved to be what they are today if not for human intervention. We never fed them raw meat, except, maybe in minute, insubstantial amounts. Dogs have long lived on the scraps of human meals. That means rarely a choice cut of fresh meat, but rather, scraps, grizzle, dairy and grains. No one ever fed their dogs entire meals of meat on a daily basis unless their name was Rockefeller. I can find no source, from books or "old-timers" in the dog world who can remember what their grandparents fed, that indicated dogs ever ate a consistent raw meat, much less mainly meat, carbohydrate exclusive, obligate carnivore-like diet.

Raw feeding is NOT the natural way to feed dogs. I personally think home cooking done right is best, but feel that many kibbles offer superior nutrition and have not gone more than a week in almost two decades of owning dogs as an adult without supplementing my own kibble fed dogs some form of fresh meat in their diet. What I saw on raw with my own dogs was antithetical to what healthy animals should look like, and after owning, breeding and being involved in various dog sports for nearly twenty years, other people's raw fed dogs have yet to impress me either. Also consider that Tom Lonsdale, one of the progenitors of raw feeding, is a certifiable crackpot, and many, many of the original proponents of "natural" diets were, at their core, of an anti-establishment, anti-corporation bent, and had an ulterior motive for lambasting commercial food.
 

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Not just the original proponents....

Ha! I begin to see the light about that aspect of raw feeding. It never actually sank in for me until I recently saw an "anti-kibble" documentary from The Other Side Of The Pond that, in one breath, was advocating healthier, "natural" diets for dogs, whilst OTOH promoted canine vegetarian diets :eek: I was wondering why that would be until about ten minutes in it became so rabidly anti-corporation, the light bulb in my mind finally clicked on.
 

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Ha! I begin to see the light about that aspect of raw feeding. It never actually sank in for me until I recently saw an "anti-kibble" documentary from The Other Side Of The Pond that, in one breath, was advocating healthier, "natural" diets for dogs, whilst OTOH promoted canine vegetarian diets :eek: I was wondering why that would be until about ten minutes in it became so rabidly anti-corporation, the light bulb in my mind finally clicked on.
Know what's interesting about forum postings on raw diet?

The fact that EVERY raw feeder on this forum has offered up suggestions of different kibbles for people to try with their dog. I don't see too many kibble feeders reversing it.


Getting back on point.
@KerriAnn, maybe you should pick pork as a single protein - and stick with it for at least a few weeks or more for bone, meat and organs. Many pork bones are fully consumable - like ribs or rib ends.
 

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Know what's interesting about forum postings on raw diet?

The fact that EVERY raw feeder on this forum has offered up suggestions of different kibbles for people to try with their dog. I don't see too many kibble feeders reversing it.

Maybe that's because many kibble feeders have tried raw and had issues with it, and why recommend a food that gave you problems? In my case, I frequently recommend home cooking, but know that takes time and money not everyone has.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Do you have a little notebook where you keep track of everyone's response :p
I think this is beyond the point..Besides, I'm looking for helpful answers, not a dispute.
 

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Maybe that's because many kibble feeders have tried raw and had issues with it, and why recommend a food that gave you problems? In my case, I frequently recommend home cooking, but know that takes time and money not everyone has.
I do know that I have read many scholarly articles, as well as the experience of raw feeders on this forum that swear by raw in terms of healing dogs, especially allergy prone dogs because of all the additives and junk thats put in kibble. The fact that most kibble can last several months to years is a sign in my opinion. I know I wouldn't eat a box of crackers that has a shelf life of 1 year+, so I definitely wouldn't expect to give my dog the same.

Although my dog is having issues still on raw, it may be just that I haven't found the right protein source as of yet. Thats all..
 

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I do know that I have read many scholarly articles, as well as the experience of raw feeders on this forum that swear by raw in terms of healing dogs, especially allergy prone dogs because of all the additives and junk thats put in kibble.

I learned the hard way that raw feeders have a habit of omitting, shall we say, the problems their dogs may be having on the diet. Not to insinuate that all raw feeders encounter issues, but I know from experience that there are common problems shared by many raw fed dogs that owners will never admit have some foundation in diet.


The fact that most kibble can last several months to years is a sign in my opinion. I know I wouldn't eat a box of crackers that has a shelf life of 1 year+, so I definitely wouldn't expect to give my dog the same.

The fact that kibble is dry inherently retards bacteria and mold. Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) is commonly used to further preserve the feed, and many brands have plastic, airtight bags. Many human foods do the same, and it's not necessarily bad or unnatural. Speaking of natural diets, human ancestors frequently preserved meats with salt and cold for months on end. We were preserving foods back in the stone age. So long as it's not loaded with a chemical cocktail of artificial preservatives, then I personally don't see the problem with shelf life.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I learned the hard way that raw feeders have a habit of omitting, shall we say, the problems their dogs may be having on the diet. Not to insinuate that all raw feeders encounter issues, but I know from experience that there are common problems shared by many raw fed dogs that owners will never admit have some foundation in diet.





The fact that kibble is dry inherently retards bacteria and mold. Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols) is commonly used to further preserve the feed, and many brands have plastic, airtight bags. Many human foods do the same, and it's not necessarily bad or unnatural. Speaking of natural diets, human ancestors frequently preserved meats with salt and cold for months on end. We were preserving foods back in the stone age. So long as it's not loaded with a chemical cocktail of artificial preservatives, then I personally don't see the problem with shelf life.
I have personally seen spiders in bags of kibble - thats disgusting. Had I not have seen that, my dog could have ate foods with spiders. That really grosses me out. And also, you never really know what the manufacturer is putting in the food. For example, for many years Blue Buffalo was hyped up as this amazing, healthy, kibble and meanwhile there are millions of lawsuits out there now which are stating that they were pumping their food full of junk. Kibbles have been known to kill dogs too because of the junk in them and how they were prepared.. think of Ol' Roy. So just because the ingredients and label may say "no artificial ingredients and fillers" that is not necessarily the case - so just beware.

Also - thinking about healthy eating - I personally would choose a fresh cut of steak over a box of crackers. Boxed foods are no good - no matter how you look at it.
 
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