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Saw a clip of this on FB today and I looked up the whole video- very interesting TedX Talk about how diet (and in particular fresh vs processed foods) impacts health and longevity in dogs.

Also, here are links to two of the ongoing studies/projects he mentioned.

1) https://longlivingpets.com/profile-view/saveregisters
The man conducting this project is not a vet, nutritionist, or scientist, and this research is not peer reviewed, but still very interesting, and you can sign up to participate with your own dog or cat whether or not they are fed raw food.

2) Keto Pet - Human-Grade Cancer Therapy for Dogs
This is very cool. However, I believe the video misrepresented the research. These dogs are on raw diets but are also undergoing a number of other therapies (such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy) and lifestyle changes (such as increasing exercise) that might also contribute to the success this facility has had with treating cancer.

Still, a good video. Humans are told to eat whole, fresh, natural foods and avoid processed foods in order to stay healthy, and wild animals aren't eating kibble, but all we feed our pets is processed food! It makes sense that adding fresh food to the diet makes animals healthier. I think the best thing I could have done for Delilah is switch her to a raw diet this year.

Another institute that I hear is going to conduct (non biased) research on diet and pet health is the Companion Animal Nutrition and Wellness Institute. I read about it in the Bark magazine however I'm not sure how far along they are with their research right now. Still something to keep an eye on though:

"Here’s what we know: Many of us are scooping processed dry food into a bowl or opening the same canned food every day. Is this really the best nutrition we can offer? Why do human nutritionists tell us to eat LESS processed foods and more fresh foods?

It is well known that heat processed foods contain compounds called Advanced Glycation End Products or dietary AGEs. Dietary AGEs have been associated with chronic diseases, aging and even cancer. And preliminary data estimates some pet foods may contain over 122 times the AGEs found in processed human foods!

So today we are announcing a very ambitious research project. CANWI has assembled a team of veterinary nutritionists, food scientists, specialized labs and a prestigious Veterinary College. They will look at the role of dietary AGEs in pet foods and compare feeding processed pet foods to more fresh food pet diets."

Animal Nutrition & Wellness | Companion Animal Nutrition and Wellness Institute

I'm definitely interested in seeing more research done on pet diet.
 
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I give my 3 Great Danes a raw diet and it helps them grow their bones stronger :) however they each have a whole chicken for a snack. It costs $400 to feed them a week. It's very expensive that's the only down side
 

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Awesome links... I feed my boxer raw frozen diet as well. Mix it up with some carrots and green juju and some doggie seaweed stuff.
 

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I take this sort of thing with a huge grain of salt, particularly in the case of the longlivingpets.com link - I am skeptical of cures that can be conveniently purchased from the writers website.

Try this article, and check out the links. The Plos One journal article makes the case that dogs have evolved to have different dietary needs than their earlier wolf-like ancestors.

Raw Diets for Pets | The SkeptVet

and
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0148899&type=printable
 

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I take this sort of thing with a huge grain of salt, particularly in the case of the longlivingpets.com link - I am skeptical of cures that can be conveniently purchased from the writers website.
Agree with you there, but I'm still interested in the information he's collecting from participants that feed their pets a variety of different diets.



The author of that blog you linked seems biased. I checked out their reviews of pet diet studies and you can tell they've already made up their mind about their opinion. Not really concerned about any of the points the link brought up:

1) There is no evidence to support claims that raw diets are healthier than cooked commercial foods.
I'm assuming the reason for this is because "raw" is not a company, not a brand. Not a big industry that can conduct or fund research like a lot of the big pet food companies. There's no one giving grants to scientists to study this.
Anyways, I couldn't find any research in favor of kibble either, the fact is that there have been no long term experimental studies that could support one thing over the other.

What I know is that humans are told to eat whole, fresh, natural food. In the wild, that's what animals eat as well, biologically appropriate diets. For some reason we think what's healthy for every other species is not healthy for domestic dogs and cats, that they're somehow special and if they don't get a perfectly formulated diet they will suffer? This is not the case with ANY other animal. Even other domestic species- we KNOW grain isn't good for cattle, they should be grass fed like they had evolved to eat as ruminants. Any good rabbit or parrot person will tell you to add whole foods (hay, veggies, fruits, nuts as appropriate) to the animal's diet, that these are MORE important and healthier than the little formulated pellets they make for these pets. But dogs and cats? Nope, God forbid you feed them something fresh.

2) There is consistent evidence that raw diets are contaminated with potentially harmful bacteria.
Same with kibble though. My dog's been raw fed for about 3-4 months now and has had no issue so far. My last dog got salmonella poisoning from Taste of the Wild kibble which ended up being recalled after she got sick. Many kibbles, cans, and treats are recalled for bacterial contamination, metal contamination, or tainted with chemicals like pentobarbital. Not saying there's also a risk in feeding raw, especially if you aren't careful about prep or storage (which everyone I've talked to about it seems to be), but it seems like this is a risk in anything you feed your pets.
Anyways, dog saliva has been found to have antibacterial properties against pathogens including E. coli. Antibacterial properties of saliva: Role in maternal periparturient grooming and in licking wounds - ScienceDirect
http://www.isisn.org/ASJ 2(1) 2011/18-22 2(1) 2011 ASJ-204.pdf
Freezing meat for a couple of weeks before feeding also helps kill off pathogens. I've been told this is especially important for fish and for wild meat (like rabbit, venison, squirrel)- with these meats I've heard you should freeze for at least 3 weeks before feeding.
Think about it, we're talking about animals that think eating poop is a good idea. And you're right that dogs have evolved to eat different diets from wolves- they evolved eating human garbage- food scraps, waste, etc!

3) It is not yet clear what the likelihood of infections in people or pets from these bacteria.
As I said, not too concerned about bacteria with my dog. I'm not concerned about getting sick from the bacteria either, I prepare raw meat to cook for my meals the same way I prepare hers. I've also worked in dog kennels for the past 6 years and at an airport with hundreds of people from all over the world everyday. Germs don't really phase me.

4) Raw bones, often included in raw diets, may reduce calculus and periodontal disease risk, though this isn’t clearly demonstrated. However, they also present a real danger of injury, including broken teeth.
This is true if it's a dense, weight bearing bone. However, in raw diets small, soft bones from birds, rabbits, fish, etc are fed.

5) Most homemade raw diets, and some commercial raw diets, may have significant nutritional deficiencies.
A dog's dietary needs are not some huge secret that only pet food companies can know about. It's fairly easy to research their nutritional requirements/RDAs online or in books, and it's possible to calculate the nutritional contents of what you feed them, nutrition information about the different ingredients in the diet is available online and in books as well.
Feeding a variety of proteins and organs also helps to balance the diet.
My dog definitely eats a more balanced diet than I do, I've never done any research into what I need to eat on a daily basis. I've been told to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables and limit red meat, that's all I know xD Not calculating all of that out like a nutritionist, concerned that I'm going to get some horrible deficiency.
 

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Did anyone actually watch the Truth About Pet Cancer mini series? It discussed the ketogenic diet for cancer and the research that has been ongoing for years in Finland called the Dogrisk Research Study on raw vs kibble vs home cooked diet. No surprises the group that did the best were the raw fed dogs. Homocysteine is an inflammatory marker, and as you can see, the raw fed dogs who continued to have raw had a much lower level.

Screenshot 2017-10-21 at 5.18.11 PM.jpg Screenshot 2017-10-21 at 5.18.51 PM.jpg
 

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I give my 3 Great Danes a raw diet and it helps them grow their bones stronger :) however they each have a whole chicken for a snack. It costs $400 to feed them a week. It's very expensive that's the only down side
A whole chicken for a snack?? $400 a week? I think you are over doing it a little. That's crazy too much even for a dane...
 

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Agree with you there, but I'm still interested in the information he's collecting from participants that feed their pets a variety of different diets.



The author of that blog you linked seems biased. I checked out their reviews of pet diet studies and you can tell they've already made up their mind about their opinion. Not really concerned about any of the points the link brought up:


I'm assuming the reason for this is because "raw" is not a company, not a brand. Not a big industry that can conduct or fund research like a lot of the big pet food companies. There's no one giving grants to scientists to study this.
Anyways, I couldn't find any research in favor of kibble either, the fact is that there have been no long term experimental studies that could support one thing over the other.

What I know is that humans are told to eat whole, fresh, natural food. In the wild, that's what animals eat as well, biologically appropriate diets. For some reason we think what's healthy for every other species is not healthy for domestic dogs and cats, that they're somehow special and if they don't get a perfectly formulated diet they will suffer? This is not the case with ANY other animal. Even other domestic species- we KNOW grain isn't good for cattle, they should be grass fed like they had evolved to eat as ruminants. Any good rabbit or parrot person will tell you to add whole foods (hay, veggies, fruits, nuts as appropriate) to the animal's diet, that these are MORE important and healthier than the little formulated pellets they make for these pets. But dogs and cats? Nope, God forbid you feed them something fresh.


Same with kibble though. My dog's been raw fed for about 3-4 months now and has had no issue so far. My last dog got salmonella poisoning from Taste of the Wild kibble which ended up being recalled after she got sick. Many kibbles, cans, and treats are recalled for bacterial contamination, metal contamination, or tainted with chemicals like pentobarbital. Not saying there's also a risk in feeding raw, especially if you aren't careful about prep or storage (which everyone I've talked to about it seems to be), but it seems like this is a risk in anything you feed your pets.
Anyways, dog saliva has been found to have antibacterial properties against pathogens including E. coli. Antibacterial properties of saliva: Role in maternal periparturient grooming and in licking wounds - ScienceDirect
http://www.isisn.org/ASJ 2(1) 2011/18-22 2(1) 2011 ASJ-204.pdf
Freezing meat for a couple of weeks before feeding also helps kill off pathogens. I've been told this is especially important for fish and for wild meat (like rabbit, venison, squirrel)- with these meats I've heard you should freeze for at least 3 weeks before feeding.
Think about it, we're talking about animals that think eating poop is a good idea. And you're right that dogs have evolved to eat different diets from wolves- they evolved eating human garbage- food scraps, waste, etc!


As I said, not too concerned about bacteria with my dog. I'm not concerned about getting sick from the bacteria either, I prepare raw meat to cook for my meals the same way I prepare hers. I've also worked in dog kennels for the past 6 years and at an airport with hundreds of people from all over the world everyday. Germs don't really phase me.


This is true if it's a dense, weight bearing bone. However, in raw diets small, soft bones from birds, rabbits, fish, etc are fed.


A dog's dietary needs are not some huge secret that only pet food companies can know about. It's fairly easy to research their nutritional requirements/RDAs online or in books, and it's possible to calculate the nutritional contents of what you feed them, nutrition information about the different ingredients in the diet is available online and in books as well.
Feeding a variety of proteins and organs also helps to balance the diet.
My dog definitely eats a more balanced diet than I do, I've never done any research into what I need to eat on a daily basis. I've been told to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables and limit red meat, that's all I know xD Not calculating all of that out like a nutritionist, concerned that I'm going to get some horrible deficiency.
All the lines you quoted are simply scare tactics generally used by vets, and are completely false. You pretty much answered them with a lot of what I would have said. The scare tactics just kill me. I wish more vets would get the facts....
 
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