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Discussion Starter #1
I know there are a lot of posts about raw bones. I read several but I am still confused.

I got chicken necks in the past but my small dog is what you might call, a voracious chewer (more like eater) and I hear a bit of crunching noises and it's gone.

I read that some owners get anxious and worried when they heard the crunching sounds. Me too.

Is there anything safe I can get that would require her to chew more? Someome (not on this site) recommended marrow bones. I am reluctant to get those. I would be scared of her hurting her teeth.

I think I read a post here about those being weight bearing bones? 2 inch marrow bones look small enough but I am worried it still might be too risky. My dog is older and although her last dental visit went well, I don't want to create an unneccessary problem. She had some teeth removed around 2 or 3 years ago. Her teeth are okay now but I want them nice and white/healthy.

The only other idea I had is a senior kong toy. I really like the idea of a natural bone, though, but it has to be safe and a bonus is if she has to chew it. She loves chicken necks and devours them but the chewing doesn't last very long.

Any suggestions?

Oh, I currently feed prepared Iron Raw dog good. She loves treats and is not picky.
 

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My little dogs chew on the marrow bones but I always let my bigger dogs eat the marrow out of them first. It seems to be too rich for them but they still get the flavor of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How 'little' is your dog? What size of bone?

I am wondering if 2" marrow bone would be safe. Most sites mention chicken necks and other chicken parts for small dogs.
 

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My dog is 17 pounds, and has been raw fed for quite some time now. He gets chicken wings, chicken necks, chicken feet, duck necks, Cornish hens, small turkey necks, and lamb ribs. For these edible bones, I typically hold them, as if I didn’t, he would (like yours) eat them very quickly without chewing them much. So I hold them for him (just make sure you wash your hands well afterwards.
For bones that last awhile, and are good for teeth cleaning, I have used beef ribs, and pork and venison shoulder. Also marrow bones, and knuckle bones. With these, he normally eats them outside. They can’t really eat these bones but they get a good chew and teeth cleaning. Sometimes I freeze them and serve them frozen, then they last even longer. Good luck!
 

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Stay away from chicken bones altogether. Cervical (neck) bones have sharp parts and leg bones break into sharp splinters. Both of them could rip the esophagus and cause irreparable damage that could lead to death, a very expensive repair, or the need for euthanasia. That is especially true for small dogs.
 

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Cooked bones splinter because they become softened in the cooking process.
However working in emergency, I have seen so many obstructions caused by bones.

If you really want to give your dog a bone, go to the butcher, get an uncooked soup bone. Supervise your pet while he chews and take away when done.
 

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Stay away from chicken bones altogether. Cervical (neck) bones have sharp parts and leg bones break into sharp splinters. Both of them could rip the esophagus and cause irreparable damage that could lead to death, a very expensive repair, or the need for euthanasia. That is especially true for small dogs.
I totally agree about Neck bones. Stay away from those.
 

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I think it's great that you're being careful with what you give to your dog. I remember when I was little I would see some of my family members just feed their dogs the leftovers, all sorts of bones included. Once, I was at my aunt's house and my little cousin was eating a chicken leg. He took a bite of it and then put it on my plate instead of on his plate. I was not happy with this and the only thing that occurred to me at that moment was to give it to the dog. So I took it and threw it across the room where the dog caught it. My little cousin did not mind, but his older sister actually scolded me, not because of the danger to the dog, but because there was still meat on that bone and I could've just put it back on my little cousin's plate.
I don't know where I was going with that, but yeah, I had not really heard of the dangers of bones, but they could lead to some serious internal damage and vet visits.
 

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My small dogs enjoy a good soup bone. I also usually try to get a joint end that has been split. The marrow is full of good nutrition for them.
 
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