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Discussion Starter #1
What is your favourite rare breed & why.
TMs where not all that long ago a rare breed & still are in some countries but are not genuinely a rare breed these days.
I have a bit of a fascination with the bearded Australian or Tasmanian Smithfield herding dogs that originated from stumpy tailed box headed cattle dogs that came over on he first fleets with livestock from Britain. There are people committed to reconstructing the breed with the limited number of pure & generally bc x dogs that where left a decade or so ago. Now they have quite a gene pool going & are starting to breed true. Or as true as any sane person wants of a breed anyways specially a working breed.
If I had a use for a herding breed dog I have them in a heart beat but I do not & think it is important they stay true working breed.

Thai Ridgebacks are another that really fascinate me, I am not really for a breed being developed on 1 visual trait(especially when that trait may well be a form of spinal bidida but I did notice not all the Thai dogs have a ridge so hoping it's not a disqualifying trait so the gene pool is not restricted & to allow matings of plain to ridged dogs etc) Anyway here is a few links about the breeds mentioned & other rare breed stuff, please share your own rare breed related links photos & opinions also.

First the Smithy links & pic:

index

http://www.herdingscene.com.au/the-tasmanian-smithfield-drovers-dog/

Smithfield | Stockdog Savvy

Now Thai Ridgeback links & photo:

History of Breed Thai Ridgeback | Thai Ridgeback

Regal Thai Ridgebacks - Breeder of quality Thai Ridgeback Dogs

http://www.thephuketnews.com/phuket-pets-the-thai-ridgeback-39250.php

 

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the Icelandic sheepdog because well Im Icelandic. They are also energetic but not too much, super friendly loves everyone but extremely close and loyal to their family and also the best watch dogs I've ever met. No one gets in undetected into a house with an Iceland dog, they are like an organic doorbell. They are also very intelligent and trainable.

They have been with Icelanders since the beginning of the nation brought to the island with the original viking settlers and are speculated to be one of the ancestors of the shetland sheepdog or at least they share a relatively close heritage. It is a spitz type dog which comes in two coat varieties fluffy and super fluffy. the double coat make them very suitable to the harsh icelandic climate and because of the texture of the coat even in its most fluffiness state it will very rarely matt. Most colours are allowed in the Icelander except being mostly white. It is a very healthy breed but has a small gene pool and was saved from the brink of extinction in the 1950's. Careful breeding has though so far kept any major health problems from the breed despite little stock.

you can learn more from the icelandic kennel club which was originally founded to preserve Iceland's only native breed but now registers all many purebreds and is recognised by the FCI.

The Icelandic Kennel Club

Icelanddog - the offical homepage
 

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Hard mode: Dogs I haven't even seen in real life.

Dogo Argentino : their beautiful and what I would consider the perfect dog build. Very athletic,and noble dogs,and had a fascination of them for awhile.

Finnish Lapphund: A good medium sized dog,has the naughty and energetic spitz attitude I love,and are pretty athletic as well.

Jagd Terrier: If I ever decide to get a working type terrier this would be it.
Handsome,feisty yet dedicated to their owners.

Central asian shepherd: I don't see myself owning one,I pretty much just admire them.

Kangal: Probably wouldn't own one either,but I like how their longer live and healthier then many other giant breeds. As well as being very athletic, independent,and strong willed

West Siberian Laika: Likely the same reasons why I like Akita's.
 

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I can't say I have identified my favourite rare breed but I did recently learn of a French/Swiss breed called a Pyrenean sheepdog. They sound like remarkable little dogs - ranging from 15-30 lbs, lean, hard and athletic. Not good pets unless you want a real working dog I would imagine. Bred to work independently, like the Great Pyrenees. The Great Pyrenees hung out on the outskirts scaring off the predators while the Pyr sheps did the herding.

 

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I can't say I have identified my favourite rare breed but I did recently learn of a French/Swiss breed called a Pyrenean sheepdog. They sound like remarkable little dogs - ranging from 15-30 lbs, lean, hard and athletic. Not good pets unless you want a real working dog I would imagine. Bred to work independently, like the Great Pyrenees. The Great Pyrenees hung out on the outskirts scaring off the predators while the Pyr sheps did the herding.

I saw one of them at an agility trial. Cute little pup and pretty good on the course. :)

I've become very interested in the barbet. They're not really rare overall, but are uncommon in the US. I'd like to say I'll have one as my next dog, but I think that might be optimistic.
 

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I want a pyrshep one day so bad. I've met about a dozen or so of them? (Went out of my way to travel and meet them) and have talked to about half the breeders in the US. Cool dogs but very weird and quirky. They are supposed to have as much nervous energy in a small body as possible. They are also supposed to be very suspicious of strangers and need EXTENSIVE socialization beyond what most breeds do. Even with that socialization, many are dogs that will not allow strangers to touch them. They are also somewhat primitive in nature and can be bossy and slightly dog aggressive.

That said, the first shep I met ended up jumping all over me. They're definitely one man dogs. SUPER athletic and lots of stamina. They are really well reprsented for their rarity in agility (most famously Silvia Trkman and Le, La, and Lo and then Ashley Deacon with Luka and Dash). They seem like livewires and I've considered them heavily for Nextdog. Still may need a bit more dog experience but they're a breed I will absolutely have one day from the breeder I've picked out. The breeders I've talked to will not sell them to anyone who has not met the breed in person fairly extensively. They prefer them to go to herding breed savvy homes.

They come in two coat types- smooth face and rough face (shown above). The rough faced dogs often cord. There are some in between dogs called demi-longs that are scruffy but not quite as hairy as the full on rough faced dogs. Rough faced dogs are much more common, with only about 10% of the population being smooth faced.

I think they are a love 'em or hate 'em breed. They certainly.... have a bit of a bad reputation in agility circles in the US, it seems. They're a lot more common in Europe and from what I've heard they have a much better reputation.
 

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I want a pyrshep one day so bad. I've met about a dozen or so of them? (Went out of my way to travel and meet them) and have talked to about half the breeders in the US. Cool dogs but very weird and quirky. They are supposed to have as much nervous energy in a small body as possible. They are also supposed to be very suspicious of strangers and need EXTENSIVE socialization beyond what most breeds do. Even with that socialization, many are dogs that will not allow strangers to touch them. They are also somewhat primitive in nature and can be bossy and slightly dog aggressive.

That said, the first shep I met ended up jumping all over me. They're definitely one man dogs. SUPER athletic and lots of stamina. They are really well reprsented for their rarity in agility (most famously Silvia Trkman and Le, La, and Lo and then Ashley Deacon with Luka and Dash). They seem like livewires and I've considered them heavily for Nextdog. Still may need a bit more dog experience but they're a breed I will absolutely have one day from the breeder I've picked out. The breeders I've talked to will not sell them to anyone who has not met the breed in person fairly extensively. They prefer them to go to herding breed savvy homes.

They come in two coat types- smooth face and rough face (shown above). The rough faced dogs often cord. There are some in between dogs called demi-longs that are scruffy but not quite as hairy as the full on rough faced dogs. Rough faced dogs are much more common, with only about 10% of the population being smooth faced.

I think they are a love 'em or hate 'em breed. They certainly.... have a bit of a bad reputation in agility circles in the US, it seems. They're a lot more common in Europe and from what I've heard they have a much better reputation.
I've read the same thing about their quirks - particularly regarding socialization. Personally this isn't a breed I'd ever consider owning - but I was intrigued to learn about them and I feel like it's a breed worthy of great respect.

Amazing that you've met so many! And very good to hear that the breeders are so careful.
 

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Swedish Vallhund (might be NextDog)


Pyrenean Shepherd (smooth face):



Basset Artesien Normand


Chart Polski


Sloughi


Icelandic Sheepdog


Kooikerhondje
 

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Podencos, podencos, and more podencos

While some people knows about the Ibizans, the Beezers have a good number of "cousins", mostly in Spain and Portugal.

Podenco Andaluz

(From Wikipedia) "The Andalusian Podencos like the other hounds have a highly developed sense of sight, hearing and smell which makes them good hunters especially when it comes to rabbit." Thus, they are not exactly sighthounds, even if they body shape is similar to them. They also exist in three different sizes (small, medium and large) and three different coat lengths (smooth, wire and long)


(From google)



Podenco Canario

(From Wikipedia) "The Canarian hound is a slender and lightly built but sturdy dog, of medium size, with height at the withers approximately 55 to 64 cm (21.7 to 25.2 ins) for males, females are slightly smaller. Sizes vary with the terrain on which the dog hunts.[1] The short, dense coat should be some shade of red, white, or a combination of red and white, depending on the island and, in some cases, the specific area on some of the islands." "The breed standard states that the typical behaviour is "nervy, agitated, and of an enthusiastic dynamism"[1] a typical high-key hunting dog. Dogs of this breed that are aggressive should not be bred, but there are many others that make wonderful pets, as they are notably loyal and gentle in a way that is similar to the Greyhound."


(Not mine, featured in the same Wikipedia Article)



 

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(It doesn't let me put everything on the same post, sorry)

Maneto


According to Wikipedia, they are a variation of the medium sized Podenco Andaluz, with bassetism.



Podenco Portugueso

Podencos of this breed exist in three sizes and two coats, and the most notorious thing about them is that their temperament differs on the size. They also hunt by scent and sight.
 

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And, Finally... ¡Beezers!
(Well, Podenco Ibicenco/Ca Eivissenc, wich basically means "Ibizan Dog")

(From Wikipedia) "Ibizan Hounds are intelligent, active, and engaging by nature. Many Ibizan owners will enjoy giving you a multitude of examples of their problem solving abilities. They are true "clowns" of the dog world, delighting in entertaining their people with their antics. Though somewhat independent and stubborn at times, they do take well to training if positive methods are used, but will balk at punitive training methods."


(Not mine, featured in the same Wikipedia Article)
 

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I can't say I have a favorite, as I haven't met many rare breeds. Of course my favs are malinois and dutch shepherds, but they aren't rare.

So I guess my favorite 'rarest' breed would be the beauceron, which aren't that rare lol.
 

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The Kooikerhondje.
I love spaniels, these guys are absolutely beautiful. And from what I've read about them it sounds like their personality is very compatible with mine and what I want in a dog. They're just so difficult to find and expensive in the US.





 

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Dogo argentino. Not sure if I will ever get one as my fiance is scared of bully and mastiff breeds. :(

Maybe I will need to pursue fluffier mastiff breed.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

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Discussion Starter #16
cool there where a couple there that where totally new to me.
I love the hounds Midnight & others posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
the Icelandic sheepdog because well Im Icelandic. They are also energetic but not too much, super friendly loves everyone but extremely close and loyal to their family and also the best watch dogs I've ever met. No one gets in undetected into a house with an Iceland dog, they are like an organic doorbell. They are also very intelligent and trainable.

They have been with Icelanders since the beginning of the nation brought to the island with the original viking settlers and are speculated to be one of the ancestors of the shetland sheepdog or at least they share a relatively close heritage. It is a spitz type dog which comes in two coat varieties fluffy and super fluffy. the double coat make them very suitable to the harsh icelandic climate and because of the texture of the coat even in its most fluffiness state it will very rarely matt. Most colours are allowed in the Icelander except being mostly white. It is a very healthy breed but has a small gene pool and was saved from the brink of extinction in the 1950's. Careful breeding has though so far kept any major health problems from the breed despite little stock.

you can learn more from the icelandic kennel club which was originally founded to preserve Iceland's only native breed but now registers all many purebreds and is recognised by the FCI.

The Icelandic Kennel Club

Icelanddog - the offical homepage
They are really nice looking dogs & Im off to learn more thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I saw one of them at an agility trial. Cute little pup and pretty good on the course. :)

I've become very interested in the barbet. They're not really rare overall, but are uncommon in the US. I'd like to say I'll have one as my next dog, but I think that might be optimistic.
Wow love bearded breeds my dream dog thats very unlikely to ever happen is a Kyi Apso. Below is copy & pasted breed info followed by a link to a great read about the first dogs that where imported into the USA & what they went through to even find suitable dogs to bring home.
The Kyi-Apso is an ancient bearded Molosser, believed by some to be the oldest of its kind and a variant of the Tibetan Mastiff breed. Indigeneous to the Mt.Kailish region of the Tibetan Plateau, this rare dog has evolved over the countless centuries into a superbly resilient and resourceful animal. Used primarily for guarding livestock and property, the Tibetan Kyi Apso is also a very fast and effective hunter. The breed is naturally suspicious of strangers and some specimens might be quite stubborn and independent, but with early socialization and proper training, the Kyi Apso can make an amenable companion.
Devoted to its owner and even-tempered, this lovely bearded mastiff will surely become very popular as a family pet in the future. There is only a small number to be found in the West, but the breed is well-represented and cared for by the Tibetan Kyi Apso Club, established in the 1990's. The body is strongly-boned and muscular, with a powerful neck and a wide head. The ears are fairly long and carried low on the sides. Deep-chested and long-legged, the mighty Kyi Apso is truly an agile and athletic Moloss, prized for its stamina end energetic nature. As is the case with most of its cousins, the tail of the Kyi-Apso is fully curled. The rough coat is moderately long, dense and wiry, acceptable in all colours, but most common in black, black-n-tan, black-n-silver, brown, golden yellow and even uniform white. Average height is around 27 inches.
Tibet trip
 

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My father was Sicilian born and raised. He often spoke of great hunting dogs in Sicily...........This is the Cirneco dell'Etna or 'Sicilian Hound' it's favorite pursuit is rabbit! Has much in common with the Pharaoh hound and the Podenco. In Sicily he is bred true to type and is now accepted as a purebreed. I can only look at pictures and wish........;)
 

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