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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of moving to a new city to begin classes at the University I have transferred to. I'm super excited, but of course I am running into the "restricted breed" issue, which is making the apartment search incredibly frustrating.

My boys are both listed on their vet records as "husky mixes". Maybe that's a bit sneaky, but coming from shelters, I can't be entirely sure what they are. So, when I call or visit, I say that my dogs are husky mixes and show pictures of my vet paperwork and the dogs themselves. I have been blown away by the frequency that I find huskies on the restricted list. I'd say, at least 1/3 of the complexes that I have been most interested in do not allow Siberian Huskies. While I certainly understand the slowly changing world behind breed bans, and I know I signed up for this difficulty when I got Bear and Loki, it is the attitudes of the leasing agents that frustrates me the most. Let me tell you a couple of the interactions that have really gotten on my nerves: the ignorance and prejudice is incredible.

1: Calling the first complex on my list.
Me "Can I get the details on your pet policy, weight and breed restrictions?"
Her "Well, we don't allow any aggressive breeds."
Me "Alright, I'm not sure what that means so can you give me the specifics?"
Her "We just don't want any types that are considered aggressive."
Me "Do you consider huskies aggressive?"
Her "Yeah they are real mean dogs."
I hang up.

2: Visiting a complex, meeting with leasing agent. We are talking about the pet policy. I ask about huskies. She pulls out her sheet and we see that huskies are not listed. All is ready to go forward, then she stops and says "what about malamutes, what are those?" I say that they are different breeds, that seems fine. About 2 days later, I get an email stating that "Because our manager considers huskies and malamutes to be the same breed, your dogs are unfortunately not allowed."

3: Meeting with leasing agent at different complex. Again, huskies are on the restricted list but this woman says that mixes are considered on a case by case basis. This time I have actually brought the dogs with me, to do a personal interview. It has gone well and the entire staff has remarked on how well behaved they are. A couple days later, I get a phone call from the office manager asking about my dogs: "Unfortunately, we cannot allow your dogs because very often, people lie about what kind of dog they actually have. Sometimes people actually have pit bulls but try to pass them off as different breeds."
Me "Well, you meet my dogs so you can decide for yourself what you think they are!"
Her "We have written them down as simply "mixes" but because this is a topic that is so often lied about, they could actually be pit bulls and we wouldn't know".
Again, time to hang up.

Wondering if I can get some advice or commiseration here. I'm pretty fed up with how this has gone. Luckily, I have found one complex and one private leasing agency with a townhouse option that are my backups, although I will be spending more money than I would like.
 

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I live nextdoor to a husky mix. Maybe these bans are more due to the fact they HOWL so frequently. I'm sure my terriers are loud and annoying too, but the howling can get on our nerves sometimes it carries through the walls more than barking. I don't think they are good choice for attatched housing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I live nextdoor to a husky mix. Maybe these bans are more due to the fact they HOWL so frequently. I'm sure my terriers are loud and annoying too, but the howling can get on our nerves sometimes it carries through the walls more than barking. I don't think they are good choice for attatched housing.
I would be more accepting of the breed ban if it were based on dogs that may not be good for apartment living (destructive, loud) but in this case, it is based on "aggression". It would make more sense if the dogs were evaluated individually on a case by case basis. If they can do it for the residents, they should do it for the dogs as well.

If a felon can live in a complex, why can't my dogs, who have never even been complained about in previous living situations, live there?
 

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I live nextdoor to a husky mix. Maybe these bans are more due to the fact they HOWL so frequently. I'm sure my terriers are loud and annoying too, but the howling can get on our nerves sometimes it carries through the walls more than barking. I don't think they are good choice for attatched housing.
That's exactly why huskies are usually banned.

That howl somehow carries much further than your typical bark
 

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I've never heard of huskies and mutes being considered 'aggressive breeds'. A little girl was killed by her families two malamutes last year I think, and it barely made the headlines and was chalked up to a 'tragic accident'. If it were a bully breed we would all know of it and it would be all about the breed.

Our neighbours howling would drive us up the wall if we didn't have dogs, but as it is we have no right to complain. Also it's kinda nice how the howling immediately puts a stop to whatever our two are doing while they stare at the wall with cocked heads.
 

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Many people who hate and discriminate against bully breeds also feel similarly, but not quite as strongly, about huskies and mals. There have been enough high profile attacks and fatalities and the "statistics" (I use that lightly, we know how unreliable they are) are high enough to fit the "aggressive breed type mold" with the crazies. Canada has the same problem with northern breeds as the US has with bully breeds causing high numbers of fatalities. All has to do with popularity, who typically owns the breed type, and how they're treated. Lots of chained and neglected huskies end up with tragedies same way bullies do in the US.
 

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A lot of those attacks occur in first nations reserves though, where dogs are generally left to their own devices and often form packs. Under our former prime minister anything bad that happened to natives was a "cultural phenomenon" and rarely received much attention, that is starting to change though now. Getting a bit off topic though my fault sorry!

Unfortunately I can't offer much advise to the OP. Just keep searching and don't get discouraged! It's better to find out before you move into a place, than have to deal with hassles and bullshart after you have moved in and are busy with uni. I think it's great you are being so honest and upfront about it with potential landlords. You will find one that appreciates that and also loves dogs if you keep looking!
 

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Believe me, I totally understand that it's not a breed specific problem. It's the same phenomenon occurring in the US with bull breeds being owned in very low income areas and left to their own devices without socialization or proper care. Sadly we aren't seeing much change in that area.

My point is that it's not breed specific, which is why banning certain breed types from towns or complexes DOESNT work.
 

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Breed bans in apartments are horrible. I hate how people who know nothing about dogs get to decide what's "Aggressive". I have to say that I do think huskies aren't well...a good "apartment" dog, but if you meet the dog then you should judge that. While I know that's difficult and seems to be another banned breed, it really is insane for bully breeds. SO many bully breeds got surrendered to the shelter I volunteered at because rentals didn't allow them. It was sad to that so many people who wanted to adopt them couldn't because then they found out they weren't allowed to.

I really hope you're able to find a place to live.
 

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As someone who's parents rented property out, aggressive towards people as a reason to not allow dogs just sounds a whole lot more legal than "dog will make obnoxious howls" and or "dog is a breed known to destroy things by chewing"

As a citizen who lived in a town where there was dog fighting, the town worked to effectively ban any dogs with the name "bull" or "bully" or had the composition of a dog that could be used in dog fighting. While I'm in general against breed bans, when the police force is working overtime to recover stolen dogs that have been used for fighting, and even the good owners can't handle the damaged dogs, something has to be done. This was a serious case.

I do also think that in the American free market, I think that companies should be able to decided what risk they want to take on.
 

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Is privately owned (single home?) housing an option for you? I know in some areas near me, single homes in "ok" areas aren't much more than apartment/townhomes in nicer areas, and usually individuals are more flexible in their requirements of pet owners- if they see your dogs are friendly and well behaved, they may be more apt to allow them (assuming their HO insurance allows them- that's a biggie). Sometimes there are "pet friendly" realtors that can also help people find rental properties that allow pets- that would be an added expense, but if you are having no luck, might be worth it. Some people recommend making a "dog resume" with certifications (obedience training, CGC, etc) and references from previous landlords, vet, etc that you can give to prospective LLs. I know some people too have had decent luck with putting "wanted" ads for housing on CL and in local ad publications- guess the idea is that LLs are looking for sane, responsible tenants as much as tenants are looking for flexible, sensible LLs :)
 

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Sure - if certain breed types were more aggressive toward people I'd understand. But any dog in a responsible home can be a safe dog, breed is not a factor. I could understand landlords wanting to meet the large breed dogs of future tenants. From standard poodles to german shepherds, making sure the dog is friendly and not unruly at those sizes makes sense from a landlord standpoint.

It was incredibly difficult for me to rent with a bull breed, even in a very bull breed friendly city. So many people have rescue bully mutts, although in poorer areas dog fighting is a problem. Obviously strict regulations on dog fighting is a must.

OP, I had a lot more luck going through private owners than with companies. Companies have overarching policies but many landlords don't care as long as your dog won't cause any issues. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Is privately owned (single home?) housing an option for you? I know in some areas near me, single homes in "ok" areas aren't much more than apartment/townhomes in nicer areas, and usually individuals are more flexible in their requirements of pet owners- if they see your dogs are friendly and well behaved, they may be more apt to allow them (assuming their HO insurance allows them- that's a biggie). Sometimes there are "pet friendly" realtors that can also help people find rental properties that allow pets- that would be an added expense, but if you are having no luck, might be worth it. Some people recommend making a "dog resume" with certifications (obedience training, CGC, etc) and references from previous landlords, vet, etc that you can give to prospective LLs. I know some people too have had decent luck with putting "wanted" ads for housing on CL and in local ad publications- guess the idea is that LLs are looking for sane, responsible tenants as much as tenants are looking for flexible, sensible LLs
Privately owned is actually my first choice, the two apartments that seem most promising are houses that have been turned into private living spaces. The landlord has told me that she doesn't care what kind of dogs I have, as long as they have no bite record.

I actually haven't had much trouble finding places that will accept huskies. I've narrowed it down to a group of 7 complexes, and those are just within walking distance of my school.

The thing that makes me angry is the attitudes of the places who do have strict breed bans. Bear is a TDI therapy dog and has his CGC, Loki has his star puppy and and obedience certificate. Giving them all this information and it still makes no difference, they are "aggressive" or I am accused of lying about their breeds. Loki was turned away because he "looks like a malamute" and Bear because he "had a stocky build so he could be a pit". The ignorance is mind boggling.

It just kills me because I would bet money on the fact that my dogs would be in the top 3 best behaved in any given complex.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
For reference, we're moving to Tampa.

My pups won't even be out and about except in the early mornings and evenings when it's cool enough for them- I can't imagine they could cause any problems (not that they would anyway) if they aren't even around the other residents.
 

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Im glad you have good prospects! We ran into the same ignorance when looking to rent. We'd ask if any dog was free to live there and they'd say of course! Once we showed up to tour an apartment and after saying they had no restrictions she added during the tour, "Of course we don't allow the aggressive breeds". We immediately let ourselves out. According to them, shelter mutt that has pointy ears could be a German shepherd mix, any blocky headed or short haired dog could be a pit bull, any Black and Tan mutt could be a rottie. Its really unfortunate.
 

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Canada has the same problem with northern breeds as the US has with bully breeds causing high numbers of fatalities. All has to do with popularity, who typically owns the breed type, and how they're treated. Lots of chained and neglected huskies end up with tragedies same way bullies do in the US.
Huskies do have a reputation for biting/attacking, and on most lists are in the top 3 breeds for aggression towards children.

While I don't see Huskies as being a breed highly desired by jerks who want a 'tough' dog, I think their owners may be more likely to let them run unleashed, which can provide more opportunity for bites.

And of course, the rez issue in Canada. The dog are generally larger and include a lot of huskies and run free, that combine with a high amount of animal abuse, neglect, and no vet care in many of those communities will of course raise the likelihood of attacks on children and other animals.
 

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There definitely is not that layer of wanting a macho "protective" dog to make you look cool or whatever that runs rampant in some bully breed owner circles. But neglect, abuse, being let roam free without supervision, poor breeding (temperament issues) etc is a recipe for disaster no matter what breed type. Some breed types in certain areas end up in these situations most often. Hence why basing rental restrictions off stats just doesn't make sense in the end.
 

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It really does suck. I've seen badly behaved and aggressive dogs of every breed, so I don't really think it does much good. I do understand that some breeds are more likely to be aggressive or destructive and loud, but often the difference is simply that they're larger and more capable of damage than a horribly behaved Chi.

I am glad I have 3 small dogs though because it makes things easier. My beagle is mixed with Rott, but she's so small most people would never know.

I think the worst thing is the damage all the irresponsible dog owners in the world have caused. Sometimes I can't blame people for being so strict and judgmental about dogs, because you see so many dogs that are allowed to wreak havoc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've actually never known personally or second hand any dog from the restricted breed list that has actually bitten someone.

The dogs I've known who have bitten someone have been: a yorkie (that one got me), 2 Australian shepherds (one of them bit me too), a Saint Bernard, a Lab, a toy Poodle, a Flat Coated Retriever, a Labradoodle, and a Jack Russel. They all happened to be purebred. So, by the logic of these bans, people shouldn't have Poodles, Labs, Aussies, or purebreds.

I've done the math on this. You are hundreds of times more likely to be KILLED by a male living in the same complex as you, than even bitten by a dog of any bred. So, should we ban men? You are infinitely more likely to be killed by a car than by a man or a dog, are we banning cars?

The logic isn't there. I could understand it if there were a shred of evidence to support the practice, but there isn't.
 

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I've done the math on this. You are hundreds of times more likely to be KILLED by a male living in the same complex as you, than even bitten by a dog of any bred. So, should we ban men? You are infinitely more likely to be killed by a car than by a man or a dog, are we banning cars?
See but the thing is, breed bans aren't actually to protect people--they're to give people the idea that they're safe. A big reason behind breed bans or breed prejudice in general is that people have this idea that there are "safe dogs" and "dangerous dogs". If they get a "Safe dog" like a Lab, Golden, or Cocker Spaniel, then they will never be hurt by that dog. But if they get a "dangerous dog" like a Pit Bull, Rottie or GSD, then they and everyone around them will be at risk. So therefore, they have the idea that if they ban the "dangerous dogs" then everyone is safe! Naturally anyone who knows dogs knows this is ridiculous and actually incredibly dangerous to believe, as well as a detriment to many dogs and dog owners. But people decide they know how to do decide what's safe and dangerous, even when they don't know a Husky from a Malamute!
 
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