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We brought Simon home 11 months ago- 20lb rescue from Mexico Terrier mix. He just very randomly nipped a man on his achilles tendon and broke some skin. In the past 11 months he's tried to do this a few times. We live rurally and are most often on relatively unpopulated trails. I want to keep him offleash, any tips on how to train this bad random behavior is much appreciated!
TIA
 

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Honestly would not go with any off-leash until this is under control.

The randomness of this behavior seems like it would make it a bit more difficult to adjust with much confidence, given the lack of consistency and thus lack of opportunity for consistent training. Without additional information and with ankles being the target, it sounds a bit like an aggressive herding behavior... but who knows...

Of course, it would be wise to ensure the dog knows that biting and nipping under any circumstance is not acceptable - be it play with people or dogs, or be it resource (or people) guarding. Prey drive is always another potential contributing factor.

Either way, your priority is to the safety of your dog and others, not to the convenience or idea of off-leashing. Personally, I never let my puppers off-leash when they could encounter other unfamiliar people, animals, or dogs, but I would definitely recommend that you avoid doing so until your confidence in their behavior is at 100%.
 

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I agree that off leash activities need to end until this situation is under control. One of my neighbors had a dog that was deemed "aggressive" simply for jumping up and scratching a passing jogger; there wasn't even a bite. A second incident of any sort would have resulted in the dog being impounded and euthanized; the family was never able to walk their dog off property again. Your dog has already displayed more problematic behavior than simply scratching someone. I would suggest a consultation with a qualified animal behaviorist to determine whether the root of the problem is indeed aggressive herding or if something else is going on.
 
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