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So, I've been DYING to get a Corgi & German Shepherd (I can't get then right now, I already have enough dogs.) but I've been refraining from getting a purebred.

The reason I've been not quite wanting a purebred is that purebreds have many many health problems, and some are actually even inbred and I'm scared that the dog would experience far too many problems.

Are there any outcrosses that look very similar to the German shepherd and corgi breeds? Such as corgi x Australian shepherd? If I do decide on getting a purebred, (pretty unlikely) are there any tips on lengthening their lifespans and keeping them as healthy as I can?
 

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Hello and welcome! If you're looking for a mixed breed with a certain appearance, I'd suggest checking Petfinder for the breeds you like best, as well as your local breed specific rescues, regular rescues and shelters. I've seen many Corgi & Aussie looking mixed breeds that need homes, and German Shepherd mixed breeds are even more numerous, sadly. There are so many good dogs dying in shelters and living in limbo without permanent homes that my opinion is that folks should adopt whenever possible. If you're not planning on showing or titling your dog or doing other things that absolutely require having a purebred, saving a homeless dog would be a wonderful option.

If you do opt to get a purebred, please please please do lots of research and go to a reputable breeder who includes a statement in the contract that you can return the dog at any time for any reason. That way you'll know that you're supporting someone whose pups aren't going to ever end up adding to the number of homeless dogs. You'll also want to know what genetic tests should be done for your breed of choice and make sure the breeder that you pick checks all of that.

These two threads here are a good starting place to learn what else to look for in a reputable breeder. The last thing you want to do is support a back yard breeder or puppy mill for all sorts of reasons, but especially if you want to make sure you get the healthiest dog possible.

http://www.dogforum.com/new-additions/note-about-reputable-breeders-pet-population-88242/

http://www.dogforum.com/new-additions/bybs-puppymills-petstores-reputable-breeders-88226/

However long a dog lives, it's never long enough, and even the healthiest, most well bred dog can have unforeseen health problems. That said, I'd think that feeding a high quality food, keeping your dog vaccinated and making sure he or she gets all of the necessary preventive care can go a long way towards keeping your dog healthy.

Good luck in your search and thanks for asking questions and being willing to do the research in advance. :thumbsup:
 

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Between the corgi's tiny legs and long back, and the shepherd's messed up hips, it sounds like a dog that could potentially have a lot of structural issues, especially since there's such a large difference in size and conformation between the parents. It doesn't really sound like the way to go if you're trying to avoid health issues.

I would expect a very high energy, intelligent dog that will need a job/lots of exercise/mental stimulation.

I know both corgis and shepherds, especially when pups, can be very mouthy and nippy. I know corgis in particular are very confident, assertive little dogs. German Shepherds should be too, but I know so many poorly bred ones that are stressy, anxious, and neurotic.

I agree if you want a mix you should go to a local shelter or rescue, or browse petfinder, and start meeting some dogs you like.

If you decide to go to a breeder, I don't think what they're breeding is going to be as important as how they're breeding. I highly doubt anyone who's breeding corgi x shepherd mixes is doing any genetic health testing or evaluations on the parents. If you want a healthy dog, health testing is a must. You will get a healthier dog from a purebred breeder that makes sure the parents are healthy and tests for diseases the breed is predisposed to than by going to a breeder that's just randomly breeding two dogs together, even if they are mixes.
 

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I don't see how getting a mix is going to be healthier and not be open to many health problems. Both can have degenerative myelopathy, the pups could have bad hips and disc (back) problems. You have two parent breeds with their own sets of health problems. I'd rather have a healthy inbred, pure bred than a risky bred mix. While we want our dogs to live long I don't think that should be the only considerstion. Whether pure or mixed is a longer life crippled with DM or HD and going through surgeries better?
 
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