Dog Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! So, this past Sunday my family got a puppy. The man we purchased her from claimed that she is a purebred Australian Shepherd. However, every Aussie pup I have seen has a fluffy coat. So, I'm not completely convinced. She doesn't have any papers to prove she is an actual pure bred. My husband saw the mother and father. He said both dogs looked like Aussies and that the father was registered. Can purebred Aussies have a shorter coat? I've posted a few pictures of her. What do you guys think?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,915 Posts
It's totally possible her coat will fluff out as she ages, and iets also possible she's a "farm" Aussie which would account for the coat difference and some of the structural differences I see, especially in her face, that don't look like what you'd see if you simply googled "Aussie puppy".

I think it's possible she's purebred, but it would be interesting to see her as an adult.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
The actual coat pattern/markings don't scream Aussie to me, but that doesn't necessarily mean she's not an Aussie.

How old is she, and how much does she weigh? What coat colours did the parents have?

These pictures show a little bit of the coat changes Levi has experienced so far. His age is the pictures are 9 weeks, 3 months, 4 months and 10 months.






He got significantly fluffier, and he's from a registered breeder who does show, so I imagine he's a little bit fluffier than a nice working line farm Aussie (although they are hard to find, so if you did I'm very jealous!)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sabina88

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She is 7 weeks, not sure about the weight, but she's seeing the vet tomorrow. My husband said both parents were black tri. Both of her siblings that were left were black tri as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
I agree with poppykenna, and you could always get a dna test at some point to see what she is if you want. And like poppykenna said, she may get more fluffy as she gets older.

As for the coat, aussies can have less fluffy/flatter coats. For instance my Australian shepherd really doesn't have much fluff to his coat other then his but and chest/neck.
Dog Mammal Vertebrate Australian collie Dog breed
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
I think she looks like a pure bred working aussie. A lot of aussies that you see if you google are going to be more confirmation bred puppies. Confirmation bred tend to have the thicker coats. Your girl seems more working bred aussie. They tend to have the shorter coats and usually are from tri parents (According to me herding instructor, tris make better workers which is why you won't see a lot of merles out working farms. Pure speculation though). Honestly, I would bet she is pure. And be prepared, if she is a working bred aussie you are going to have a TON of energy to spare!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
You bought a 7 week old puppy from someone you're not confident enough in to ensure yourself that you got what you were told you were getting.......

I would be more concerned about its health etc, and just hope for the best. If both parents were there, it's probably purebred, or at least close to it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
Definitely would echo what @jclark343 said. Even show bred Aussies are crazy, so one from a farm will have energy to spare I imagine. Start coming up with trick ideas for her! :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
remember, aussies started out as ranch dogs, and had a wide variety of coat types, color patterns, ear carriages, tail types, etc.

As people started buying Assies mainly as pets and secondarily as frisbee dogs, agility dogs, etc. they got more popular, a splinter broke off and sought AKC registration, and got it, and started breeding for conformation shows.

In both the livestock working lines and the show lines there are a spectrum of types, however, IN GENERAL....

Working types, in addition to having a lot more cattle/sheep savvy and much stronger herding instincts are #1 Greater overall variance in appearance even amongst the same litter #2 have higher ears, narrower faces, #3lighter boned #4 less fluffy coats, coats a lot like the BC in overall length and lack of fluff often referred to as a 'utility coat', #5 color-wise are generally darker, #6 less likely to have the dilute gene (feeds into darker color), #7 less likely to have the merle gene (feeds into darker color) #8 less likely to have the natural bob tail gene. #9 temperment wise be more reserved with strangers/'better watch dogs'

Your dog appears to me to fall well within the full spectrum of the overall breed, actually it's fairly 'middle ground'....it's just that most show dog types (the types you are most likely to see, even if they aren't active show dogs) fall on the far right with their lots more white, fluffier coats, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
951 Posts
I should also ad there seems to be a 3rd type forming, from dogs that may work on hobby farms not full blown 'do ranch work all day, every day' type places, to dog that do agility, frisbee, and other sports. These aussies seen to walk the middle ground as far as overall structure, coat length, herding ability, energy levels, etc. These dogs do fully side with the show lines in the areas of being friendly vs stand-offish with strangers, as well has having lighter colored coats, more frequently merle, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you kindly for your responses! This was very helpful and insightful. Along with searching images of Australian Shepherds on Google, I've seen a few in person and their coats/appearances were different. There are not very many images on the Internet of Aussies with short hair. Her coat is currently soft, with a little fluff to it (unless it gets wet, then it becomes wavy and sticks up all over the place). She's extremely intelligent and eager to learn! We love and spoil her already!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
Oh you may be surprised what kind of coat that grows into!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,599 Posts
I agree. I miss Levi's soft, fuzzy, (very non-shedding...) puppy coat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Awe he looks just like the one I grew up with (obviously my picture is when he was a senior):

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
No idea! I imagine he is going to have more of a silky smooth coat, and not so much the crazy coat.

This is Forbes as a puppy (the photos that I have from the breeder, as I didn't get him til he was a year)


And Forbes now
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
Thanks, but I am partial.

But seriously, don't be upset if your dog doesn't get that full coat. I wish my dog had less of a coat. That is his coat after I have tried to strip out some of the undercoat. Sometimes the undercoat is more of a hassle then it's worth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've been reading up on working line Australian Shepherds and I feel pretty confident now that my little lady is in the working line breed. I never even knew there was a difference until this thread! So, once again, thank you to all who have replied! I'm still very interested to see how her adult coat will come in! I'm hoping for a nice full coat but will love her regardless! My husband and 4 year old daughter named our Aussie girl "Joey". Training has been a hit and miss with her so far.

She also has very high anxiety while riding in a vehicle. Is there any way I can get her more comfortable? I would love to take her on walks and to the dog park once she's fully vaccinated.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,167 Posts
She's so cute :), I like the name joey.

My aussie is not a fan of car rides either. One way to help her in the car is, have her go in the car when its parked and not moving and just give her rewards and treats for being in the car. That way she associates being in the car with good things. Once she's happily getting in the car and comfortable when its not moving, then you can try going for short drives, and give her lots of praise and treats. Once she's comfortable with the short drives you can move up to longer distances.
I would say especially because she does have some anxiety to begine with in the car, make sure she has a empty stomach when going for car rides (especially longer ones).

I think this might be helpful for you to read, https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/fear-riding-cars
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top