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She is a Bull Terrier/Jack Russel cross. When I first got her at 10 weeks a brutal and long winter set in so she was paper trained indoors because it was just too cold to be outside. Now I have been taking her out regularly, and for long periods of time, and she STILL runs back in and pees or poops on her paper instead of on the grass!
How can I fix this mistake that I made and retrain her? Keep in mind, she is wildly ADHD and very stubborn!
 

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OK, well it appears you understand the source of the problem... you house trained her to the papers, in the house. Know that house training is simply formation of a habit, and that habit gets very strong very quickly.

Understand that she is doing exactly what you trained her to do, and if it was not for the fact you trained her to potty in the house, you would be very pleased with what you are not calling "stubborn", so give her a break here. She is not defying you. She is steadfastly doing what you taught her. That was very good training indeed!

The good news is that this CAN be fixed, but will take some extra efforts on your part. :)

Now some tips and ideas...
You can try putting the paper closer and closer to the door, then on the step and so on.

or

You can take the paper away entirely from indoors, and provide paper outdoors. AND when she is indoors, she must be confined to her crate, or on a leash with you, so she cannot walk around and find a place to go.


If she does go potty outdoors, IMMEDIATELY give her the tastiest treat (keep them in your pocket). Do this every time, for weeks. Take her to the same place in the yard every time (on a 6 to 10 foot leash). Put some paper down for her there at first until she gets used to going potty there. Wait patiently for her to go. Don't coach her or command her. She does not understand what you are telling her and it is just a huge distraction to have the human chattering away. Just stand there and be boring. If she does not potty in 10 or 15 minutes, take her back inside and return her to the crate. Repeat over and over patiently until your first success. Reward with treat. Then she can have some play time. :)

Do not scold her for going on paper inside... that's not only not fair, but will confuse her and perhaps scare her.

You are going to need to be very vigilant in your management of her indoors for quite some time, perhaps weeks, to PREVENT her going inside. That means not providing her with the opportunity to potty inside. (unless you are doing the slow moving of the papers technique.) Prevention means confining to a crate or on a leash to your body at all times. No free run of the house at all. Not even a moment.

Good luck and do let us know how it goes.
We get many stories like yours, which is why I always recommend people house train their puppies right to the outdoors from the start, if at all possible. We once housetrained our first setter to the outdoors in the middle of winter in New Hampshire USA, when it was all ice and snow and below zero. Miserable for sure, but saved us in the long run. He was a 75 pound dog as an adult, and it would not have been fun dealing with indoor messes from him. ;)
 

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In addition, you could try the belly bands in the house if you have the paper outside, that way it's hard or feels awkward if she tries to pee in the house, then you can take it off outside.
 

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In addition, you could try the belly bands in the house if you have the paper outside, that way it's hard or feels awkward if she tries to pee in the house, then you can take it off outside.
Do they make belly bands for female dogs? I thought that was a male dog only thing...
 

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Do they make belly bands for female dogs? I thought that was a male dog only thing...
I never knew they were male/female distinct-I didn't have to use one but assumed it would work for both sexes. I guess worth a shot if you're still having trouble?
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Well its just that the anatomy does not really work for a female.

Traditionally belly bands are helpful to work on problematic indoor marking with male dogs. They are not really for normal potty training issues for puppies. I see why you suggested it, but its not someting I think I would try in this case. ;)
 
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