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Hello all, I am new here! A little background, I have always had dogs. I currently have 2 (both rescues), my 1 1/2 year old German Shepherd/ yellow lab mix Riley, and our newest addition a 9 week old blue heeler mix (no clue on her mix, waiting to see!) Lily.

The reason I'm here is miss Lily is a car chaser. Riley is trained to stay with me when we are out front or to stay out back unless he's invited through the gate if it's open. Basically, he's perfect and gets to go do a lot of things off of leash because he is so good and trustworthy. He has never chased anything or even gave it more than a glance. I had miss Lily out front doing a little boundary training while getting the mail (I use horse clicks to teach my dogs to focus on me) up near the front door and she darted across the front yard when a car went by. Luckily she has short legs and was easily snatched up before she got too far but I want to nip this in the butt immediately.

I have done my homework on heelers, I've had herding breeds before, I just need a second opinion. Of course boundary training is on a leash until she learns to focus better. I think it's crucial for dogs to know where they are allowed to go and where they aren't when outside, especially with young kids running in and out all day, but I've never had a dog try to chase a car so young! Usually they are older before I have to correct them for looking at the cars/bikes etc.

I am hoping obedience training will help her learn to focus on me better and she can learn to ignore the things she wants to chase. I've had amazing luck with redirection before but again, they were older and not as hard wired to catch it. Funny thing is, she lives with 3 cats and don't chase a single one, silly puppy. Any tips would be appreciated!!
 

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Herding breeds do tend to chase/herd cards. So it can be a nasty habit to get rid of. I would suggest practicing basic obedience at a safe distance , on a leash, when there's car nearby. It will teach her to focus on you even when there's distraction. By basic obedience I mean asking for sits, stay, short range recall, down command.

When she starts being good at obeying with this distraction, get closer and closer until she can focus 100% on you even with cars passing by. Second step would be to train a bomb proof recall. Practice with longer leash until you don't need one anymore.
 

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I would teach a default behavior when she sees a car. That could be anything from sitting, or looking back at you. That way instead of constantly trying to correct the behavior, she's offering you an alternate one instead.
 
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If I read your post properly, you are talking about the 9 week old Miss Lily car chaser extraordinaire. At 9 weeks old, it's a pretty tall order to expect a pup of that age to exhibit any impulse control as well execute any obedience skills. Heck, she's just so young. I'm not a huge fan of management in many cases as a fix but in this case since she is soooo young, the less you allow her the opportunity to immediately gratify her urges, the better off you will be and it will so much easier to train some impulse control into her when she matures a bit. At 9 weeks old, I'd be building the bond and exploring her new world together, you'll have plenty of time in the very near future for teaching some of the items others mentioned. Miss Lilly's attention span right now is minimal and expectations should be commensurate with this phase. I might build on any good behavior she offers or good behavior you can gently create, mostly through fun interaction.
 
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