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Hi all,

I have a 18 week old GSD puppy named Leo. He's a high energy puppy, but we've been working on draining that energy with interactive food toy puzzles, flirt pole exercise, exercise on the long lead, and puppy classes.

The main problem I'm having is his hyper-ness when he sees another dog. If we walk by dogs barking in the backyard he tenses up, his hair raises, and he won't stop barking. If I'm walking him along the street and he sees another dog he will eagerly bound over to play with them and I usually have to grab him. (Being a GSD I don't think that picking him up is going to be a reasonable option in the future.)

How can I teach him to focus on me around other dogs? The trainer in puppy class also said that Leo isn't very good at picking up social cues from other dogs, and noticing when they don't want to play with them. He's pushy, and he frequently got time outs in class.

I totally feel at a loss on how to train him to be calm around other dogs. I just "graduated" puppy class, but honestly I feel like while he may have learned tricks his manners only got worse.
 

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The ultimate guide to dog training: Chapter 10 basic cues

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO DOG TRAINING
BY TEOTI ANDERSON CPDT-KA, KPA-CTP

STRAIGHT FROM THE BOOK, NOT MY WORDS!!!





Watch Me

This behavior helps you get and keep your dog's attention. If your dog is looking at you, he won't be staring at something else that could engage his attention, such as another dog or squirrel. You can also use this cue to preface another one, such as getting your dog to look at you to help him focus on you before you start walking him on a leash.
Goal:Your dog will make eye contact with you when you call his name.
What You'll Need:Clicker, treats. Optional: leash. If your dog is very busy and easily distracted, despite being in a quiet area, you can put him on a leash to limit his room to explore and lose focus.
Preparation:Train this behavior in a quiet room with very few distractions.Put away your dog's toys so that they won't distract him.

1.Stand quietly, with your feet planted. Wait for your dog to look you in the eye.
2.The second that he makes eye contact, click and treat. Make sure he's not looking at your hand or the treats. Wait for him to look you in the eye.
3.Repeat for a total of ten repetitions. End your training session.
4.Repeat Steps 1-3 until your dog is reliably giving you eye contact.
Tip:Be patient! This exercise can be challenging for young puppies because they are easily distracted by many things. Even a spot of dirt on the floor is fascinating to a puppy. Just stand quietly and wait. When the eye contact happens, it will likely be very quick, so be ready!

When your dog is reliably giving you eye contact, it's time to add the cue.

1.Say your dog's name, once, in a friendly voice. Wait for him to make eye contact.
2.The second that your dog makes eye contact, click and treat.
3.Repeat for a total of ten repetitions. End your training session.
4.Repeat Steps 1-3 until your dog is reliably responding to his name by giving you eye contact in areas with few distractions.
 
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